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  1. [author unknown], .
  2. Guy Axtell (2014). Possibility and Permission? Intellectual Character, Inquiry, and the Ethics of Belief. In Pihlstrom S. & Rydenfelt H. (eds.), William James on Religion. (Palgrave McMillan “Philosophers in Depth” Series.
    This chapter examines the modifications William James made to his account of the ethics of belief from his early ‘subjective method’ to his later heightened concerns with personal doxastic responsibility and with an empirically-driven comparative research program he termed a ‘science of religions’. There are clearly tensions in James’ writings on the ethics of belief both across his career and even within Varieties itself, tensions which some critics think spoil his defense of what he calls religious ‘faith ventures’ or ‘overbeliefs’. (...)
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  3. Guy Axtell (2006). Blind Man's Bluff: The Basic Belief Apologetic as Anti-Skeptical Stratagem. Philosophical Studies 130 (1):131--152.
    Today we find philosophical naturalists and Christian theists both expressing an interest in virtue epistemology, while starting out from vastly different assumptions. What can be done to increase fruitful dialogue among these divergent groups of virtue-theoretic thinkers? The primary aim of this paper is to uncover more substantial common ground for dialogue by wielding a double-edged critique of certain assumptions shared by `scientific' and `theistic' externalisms, assumptions that undermine proper attention to epistemic agency and responsibility. I employ a responsibilist virtue (...)
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  4. C. Bottici (2009). The Politics of Imagination and the Public Role of Religion. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (8):985-1005.
    The aim of this article is to show that, in order to understand the new public role of religion, we need to rethink the nexus, often neglected by contemporary philosophy, between politics and imagination. The current resurrection of religion in the public sphere is linked to a deep transformation of political imagination which has its roots in the double process of the reduction of politics to mere administration, on the one hand, and to spectacle, on the other. In an epoch (...)
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  5. Steven D. Boyer (2007). The Logic of Mystery. Religious Studies 43 (1):89-102.
    This paper proposes an analytical taxonomy of ‘mystery’ based upon what makes a mystery mysterious. I begin by distinguishing mysteries that depend on what we do not know (e.g. detective fiction) from mysteries that depend on what we do know (e.g. religious mysteries). Then I distinguish three possible grounds for the latter type. The third and most provocative ground offers a mathematical analogy for how rational reflection can be appropriate to mystery without compromising its intrinsically mysterious character. I conclude with (...)
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  6. David B. Burrell (1973). Analogy and Philosophical Language. New Haven,Yale University Press.
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  7. Linell E. Cady (2011). Religious Imagination in a Late Secular Age: Extending Liberal Traditions in the Twenty-First Century. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (1):23 - 42.
    These are not easy times for extending liberal religious traditions. I am struck by how much has changed in the past two decades, how differently I now imagine the challenges and possibilities of constructive religious thought. What's happened? What are the salient features of our current moment, and the constraints and opportunities for religious reflection that it affords? These are, of course, large and complex questions. But my charge to reflect upon future directions in liberal religious thought must inevitably begin (...)
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  8. Beverley Clack (2007). After Freud: Phantasy and Imagination in the Philosophy of Religion. Philosophy Compass 3 (1):203-221.
    Philosophers of religion have tended to focus on Freud’s dismissal of religion as an illusion, thus characterising his account as primarily hostile. Those who wish to engage with psychoanalytic ideas in order to understand religion in a more positive way have tended to look to later psychoanalysts for more sympathetic sources. This paper suggests that other aspects of Freud’s own writings might, surprisingly, provide such tools. In particular, a more subtle understanding of the relationship between illusion and reality emerges in (...)
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  9. Irwin Edman (1928). Religion and the Philosophical Imagination. Journal of Philosophy 25 (25):673-685.
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  10. M. Emery (2008). Review: Henry Duméry, Imagination Et Religion. Eléments de Judaïsme, Éléments de Christianisme, Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 2006, 468pp. [REVIEW] Diogenes 55 (1):143-144.
    This is a review of H. Duméry’s volume Imagination et religion. Éléments de judaïsme, éléments de christianisme. The author studies biblical religion and the origins of the Christian religion, classifying and recording the imaginative element that feeds the narratives of piety: hence the rehabilitation of the myths that frame the functioning of religious representations. The author suggests that the imagination, in its deepest resources, forges the human social, has the power to invent all social roles, and causes the emergence of (...)
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  11. José Faur (1992). Imagination and Religious Pluralism. New Vico Studies 10:36-51.
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  12. Michael Fishbane (1992). “The Holy One Sits and Roars”: Mythopoesis and the Midrashic Imagination. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 1 (1):1-21.
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  13. Sally Fitzgerald (1997). 5. Sources and Resources: The Catholic Imagination of Flannery O'Connor. Logos 1 (1).
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  14. Jaco Gericke (2012). The Hebrew Bible and Philosophy of Religion. Society of Biblical Literature.
    This study pioneers the use of philosophy of religion in the study of the Hebrew Bible. After identifying the need for a legitimate philosophical approach to Israelite religion, the volume traces the history of interdisciplinary relations and shows how descriptive varieties of philosophy of religion can aid the clarification of the Hebrew Bible’s own metaphysical, epistemological, and moral assumptions. Two new interpretative methodologies are developed and subsequently applied through an introduction to what the biblical texts took for granted about the (...)
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  15. Robert F. Gleckner (1956). Blake's Religion of Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 14 (3):359-369.
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  16. Yoji K. Gondor, Religious Topics in the 21st Century.
    Abstract: With all the obstacles and challenges it has suffered, the modern religion is an integral part of our society. Are the religions and the new technical developments in any form of reasonable harmony? There is nothing greater than infinity, nothing more mysterious than the infinite space or time, and nothing more mysterious than the Creator. In this way, it seems that there is a symbolic correlation connecting the concept of infinity and the transcendental vision of the mighty Creator. Is (...)
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  17. Thomas Gornall & J. S. (1963). A Note on Imagination and Thought About God. Heythrop Journal 4 (2):135–140.
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  18. Garrett Green (1981). On Seeing the Unseen: Imagination in Science and Religion. Zygon 16 (1):15-28.
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  19. Erdman Harris (1959). God's Image and Man's Imagination. New York, Scribner.
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  20. K. Mitch Hodge (2011). On Imagining the Afterlife. Journal of Cognition and Culture 11 (3-4):367-389.
    The author argues for three interconnected theses which provide a cognitive account for why humans intuitively believe that others survive death. The first thesis, from which the second and third theses follow, is that the acceptance of afterlife beliefs is predisposed by a specific, and already well-documented, imaginative process - the offline social reasoning process. The second thesis is that afterlife beliefs are social in nature. The third thesis is that the living imagine the deceased as socially embodied in such (...)
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  21. Rodney Holmes (1996). Homo Religiosus and its Brain: Reality, Imagination, and the Future of Nature. Zygon 31 (3):441-455.
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  22. Charles R. Inserillo (1962). Symbolism and the Christian Imagination. International Philosophical Quarterly 2 (4):665-666.
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  23. Kevin T. Jackson (1999). Spirituality as a Foundation for Freedom and Creative Imagination in International Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 19 (1):61 - 70.
    Spirituality, in the broad sense, provides a deeper foundation for principles of international business ethics than legalistic, command-based ethics programs. Spiritual-based principles and values are presupposed and endorsed by established legal and ethical principles for international business. Identifying such spiritual-based principles and values requires the exercise of moral imagination and an openness to values embraced by the world's religions. Once identified, a new realm of moral freedom is attained for multinational corporations which may help them move beyond an "ethics for (...)
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  24. Emmanuel Katongole (2003). Kannungu and the Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God in Uganda: A Challenge for Christian Social Imagination. Logos 6 (3).
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  25. Ian Ker (1997). 6. Newman on Imagination and Religious Belief. Logos 1 (1).
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  26. Charles D. Laughlin & C. Jason Throop (2001). Imagination and Reality: On the Relations Between Myth, Consciousness, and the Quantum Sea. Zygon 36 (4):709-736.
  27. Ralph Barton Perry (1904). Truth and Imagination in Religion. International Journal of Ethics 15 (1):64-82.
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  28. Christopher Pramuk (2007). 'They Know Him by His Voice': Newman on the Imagination, Christology, and the Theology of Religions. Heythrop Journal 48 (1):61–85.
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  29. Heidi M. Ravven (2001). Some Thoughts on What Spinoza Learned From Maimonides About the Prophetic Imagination: Part 1. Maimonides on Prophecy and the Imagination. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):193-214.
  30. Heidi M. Ravven (2001). Some Thoughts on What Spinoza Learned From Maimonides on the Prophetic Imagination: Part Two: Spinoza's Maimonideanism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (3):385-406.
  31. Randall S. Rosenberg (2007). The Catholic Imagination and Modernity: William Cavanaugh's Theopolitical Imagination and Charles Taylor's Modern Social Imagination. Heythrop Journal 48 (6):911–931.
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  32. Arthur Saniotis (2009). Encounters with the Religious Imagination and the Emergence of Creativity. World Futures 65 (7):464 – 476.
    Ervin Laszlo's notion of the interrelationship between evolution and creativity as being intrinsic to universal life processes has been influential to the biological and social sciences. Central to Laszlo's thinking is the notion of convergence in biological and social systems that are posited on creative complexity. In this article, I employ Laszlo's concept of creativity in relation to the human religious imagination. Cross-cultural studies of the religious imagination examine the architecture of human consciousness and ways of knowing. These two areas (...)
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  33. J. L. Schellenberg (2011). Skepticism as the Beginning of Religion. In Ingolf Dalferth (ed.), Skeptical Faith. Mohr Siebeck.
  34. J. L. Schellenberg (2009). The Evolutionary Answer to the Problem of Faith and Reason. In Jonathan Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in the Philosophy of Religion, vol. 2. Oup Oxford.
  35. John Smith (1660/1979). Select Discourses. Scholar’s Facsimiles and Reprints.
    Reprinted with Introduction by C. A. Patrides. Delmar, NY: Scholar’s Facsimiles and Reprints, 1979.
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  36. Shaun Smith, N, N-DIMETHYLTRYPTAMINE AND BIOLOGICAL REDUCTIVE ACCOUNTS FOR RELIGIOUS AND SPIRITUAL EXPERIENCES. Liberty University Digital Commons.
    There is unquestionably a plethora of details and mysteries regarding the mind and the body. However, with the advent of psychopharmacology (the study of how psychedelics inform or alter brain states) there are more issues at hand. Do psychedelics allow us to access deeper areas of our consciousness? Are we having a spiritual experience under the influence of psychedelics? Dr. Rick Strassman does not want to continue asking these rather conspiratorial-like questions. Instead, Dr. Strassman believes that there is one special, (...)
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  37. Neil Van Leeuwen (2014). Religious Credence is Not Factual Belief. Cognition 133 (3):698-715.
    I argue that psychology and epistemology should posit distinct cognitive attitudes of religious credence and factual belief, which have different etiologies and different cognitive and behavioral effects. I support this claim by presenting a range of empirical evidence that religious cognitive attitudes tend to lack properties characteristic of factual belief, just as attitudes like hypothesis, fictional imagining, and assumption for the sake of argument generally lack such properties. Furthermore, religious credences have distinctive properties of their own. To summarize: factual beliefs (...)
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  38. Charles E. Winquist (1972). The Transcendental Imagination: An Essay in Philosophical Theology. The Hague,Nijhoff.
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  39. Raymond Aaron Younis (1994). Religious Experience, Modern Fiction and the Aesthetics of the Sacred. In Michael Griffith & Ross Keating (eds.), Religion Literature and the Arts. RLA Project. 457-465.