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  1. M. A. (1968). Descartes Et le Rationalisme. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 22 (2):387-387.
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  2. R. A. (1963). Moral y Libertad En Descartes. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 16 (3):586-586.
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  3. John Edward Abbruzzese (2008). Do Descartes and St. Thomas Agree on the Ontological Proof? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 89 (4):413-435.
    Abstract: Contrary to received opinion, Descartes' view on the merits of the ontological proof may actually agree with that of Thomas Aquinas, whose rejection of the a priori existence proof has stocked the armories of anti-Anselmians ever since. In a rarely noted passage of the First Replies, Descartes claims not to differ in any respect from Thomas on the proof, a claim that gains sense in light of recent work on the Fifth Meditation. That work in turn reveals a well-founded, (...)
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  4. John Edward Abbruzzese (2007). A Reply to Cunning on the Nature of True and Immutable Natures. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):155 – 167.
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  5. John Edward Abbruzzese (2007). The Structure of Descartes's Ontological Proof. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):253 – 282.
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  6. Fred Ablondi (2007). Why It Matters That I'm Not Insane: The Role of the Madness Argument in Descartes's First Meditation. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (1):79-89.
    Descartes’s First Meditation employs a series of arguments designed to generate the worry that the senses might not provide sufficient evidence to justify one’staking as certain one’s beliefs about the way the world is. As the meditator considers what principle describes the conditions under which it is possible to attain certain knowledge, one after another doubt-generating device is ushered in, until at last he finds himself like someone caught in a whirlpool, able neither to stand firm nor to swim out. (...)
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  7. Fred Ablondi (2006). Descartes Reinvented. Review of Metaphysics 60 (2):426-427.
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  8. Fred Ablondi (2005). Almog's Descartes. Philosophy 80 (3):423-431.
    The answer which Joseph Almog gives to the question which serves as the title of his recent book What Am I? (subtitled: Descartes and the Mind-Body Problem) is based upon his interpretation of (1) and objection to Descartes' argument for the distinction of the mind and the body raised by Antoine Arnauld, as well as Descartes' response to it, and (2) Descartes' letters of 9 February 1645 to Denis Mesland. I will argue that both of these interpretations are incorrect, and (...)
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  9. Fred Ablondi (1998). Automata, Living and Non-Living: Descartes' Mechanical Biology and His Criteria for Life. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):179-186.
    Despite holding to the essential distinction between mind and body, Descartes did not adopt a life-body dualism. Though humans are the only creatures which can reason, as they are the only creatures whose body is in an intimate union with a soul, they are not the only finite beings who are alive. In the present note, I attempt to determine Descartes'' criteria for something to be ''living.'' Though certain passages associate such a principle with the presence of a properly functioning (...)
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  10. William E. Abraham (1974). Disentangling the `Cogito'. Mind 83 (329):75-94.
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  11. Darren Abramson (2011). Descartes' Influence on Turing. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (4):544-551.
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  12. C. Adam & P. Tannery (1996). Descartes, R. Correspondence with Elisabeth, Daughter of Frederick-V (1643). Filozofia 51 (7):454-457.
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  13. Ch Adam (1937). Descartes: Ses trois notions fondamentales. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 123 (5/8):1 - 14.
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  14. Ch Adam (1937). Descartes Sa Vie Et Son Œvre. Boivin & Cie.
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  15. Ch Adam (1895). Note sur le texte Des regulæ ad directionem ingenii de Descartes. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 40:288 - 293.
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  16. Marcus P. Adams (2014). The Wax and the Mechanical Mind: Reexamining Hobbes's Objections to Descartes's Meditations. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):403-424.
    Many critics, Descartes himself included, have seen Hobbes as uncharitable or even incoherent in his Objections to the Meditations on First Philosophy. I argue that when understood within the wider context of his views of the late 1630s and early 1640s, Hobbes's Objections are coherent and reflect his goal of providing an epistemology consistent with a mechanical philosophy. I demonstrate the importance of this epistemology for understanding his Fourth Objection concerning the nature of the wax and contend that Hobbes's brief (...)
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  17. B. M. Adkins (1952). The Dictum of Descartes. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 3 (11):259-260.
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  18. Igor Agostini (2010). L'idea di Dio in Descartes: Dalle Meditationes Alle Responsiones. Le Monnier Università.
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  19. Kristoffer Ahlstrom (2010). What Descartes Did Not Know. Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (3):297-311.
    Descartes’ epistemologies of meditation and sense imply that we cannot know anything about the mind-body union, either in the Cartesian sense of having scientia or, more interestingly, in terms of any other concept of knowledge available to Descartes. After considering the implications of this conclusion for what we may know about mind-body interaction, it becomes clear that, on Descartes’ view, we at best can be said to know that mind-body interaction, if it does in fact take place, does not violate (...)
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  20. Tuomo Aho & Mikko Yrjönsuuri (1998). Concordance to Descartes' "Meditationes de Prima Philosophia" (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (1):135-136.
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  21. Tuomo Aho, Mikko Yrjönsuuri & Suomen Filosofinen Yhdistys (1999). Norms and Modes of Thinking in Descartes. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  22. E. J. Aiton (1955). Descartes's Theory of the Tides. Annals of Science 11 (4):337-348.
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  23. Abraham Akkerman (2001). Urban Planning in the Founding of Cartesian Thought. Philosophy and Geography 4 (2):141 – 167.
    It is a matter of tacit consensus that rationalist adeptness in urban planning traces its foundations to the philosophy of the Renaissance thinker and mathematician Ren Descartes. This study suggests, in turn, that the planned urban environment of the Renaissance may have also led Descartes, and his intellectual peers, to tenets that became the foundations of modern philosophy and science. The geometric street pattern of the late middle ages and the Renaissance, the planned townscapes, street views and the formal garden (...)
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  24. Edward J. Alam & George M. Eid (2013). Descartes' Discourse on Method: More Discourse? Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 6 (2 & 3):105-122.
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  25. Lilli Alanen (2009). Review of John Cottingham, Cartesian Reflections: Essays on Descartes's Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (8).
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  26. Lilli Alanen (2008). Cartesian Scientia and the Human Soul. Vivarium 46 (3):418-442.
    Descartes's conception of matter changed the account of physical nature in terms of extension and related quantitative terms. Plants and animals were turned into species of machines, whose natural functions can be explained mechanistically. This article reflects on the consequences of this transformation for the psychology of human soul. In so far the soul is rational it lacks extension, yet it is also united with the body and affected by it, and so it is able to act on extended matter. (...)
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  27. Lilli Alanen (2008). Descartes' Mind-Body Composites, Psychology and Naturalism. Inquiry 51 (5):464 – 484.
    This paper reflects on the status of Descartes' notion of the mind-body union as an object of knowledge in the framework of his new philosophy of nature, and argues that it should be taken seriously as representing a third kind of real thing or reality—that of human nature. Because it does not meet the criteria of distinctness that the two natures composing it—those of thinking minds and extended bodies— meet, the phenomena referred to it, which are objects of psychology as (...)
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  28. Lilli Alanen (2003). Descartes's Concept of Mind. Harvard University Press.
    This is the first book to give an analysis of Descartes's pivotal concept that deals with all the functions of the mind, cognitive as well as volitional, ...
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  29. Lilli Alanen (2002). Descartes on the Will and the Power to Do Otherwise. In Henrik Lagerlund & Mikko Yrjonsuri (eds.), Emotions and Choice From Boethius to Descartes. Kluwer. 279--298.
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  30. Lilli Alanen (1996). Reconsidering Descartes's Notion of the Mind-Body Union. Synthese 106 (1):3 - 20.
    This paper examines Descartes's third primary notion and the distinction between different kinds of knowledge based on different and mutually irreducible primary notions. It discusses the application of the notions of clearness and distinctness to the domain of knowledge based on that of mind-body union. It argues that the consequences of the distinctions Descartes is making with regard to our knowledge of the human mind and nature are rather different from those that have been attributed to Descartes due to the (...)
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  31. Lilli Alanen (1991). Descartes, Conceivability, and Logical Modality. In Tamara Horowitz (ed.), Thought Experiments in Science and Philosophy. Rowman and Littlefield.
    This paper examines Descartes' controversial theory of the creation of eternal truths and the views of modality attributed to Descartes in recent interpretations of it. It shows why attempts to make Descartes' view intelligible by distinctions of different kinds of modality fail to do justice to his theory, which is radical indeed without being incoherent or involving universal possibilism or irrationalism. Descartes' opposition to traditional rationalist views of modality, it suggests, can be seen instead as foreshadowing contemporary views prefixed, logical (...)
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  32. Lilli Alanen (1989). Descartes's Dualism and the Philosophy of Mind. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 94 (3):391 - 413.
    Cet article étudie la vue cartésienne de l'homme et la connaissance obtenue par la notion de l'union de l'âme et du corps. Le but est d'analyser les conséquences de la distinction cartésienne entre des notions primitives différentes et incomparables, et des différents genres de connaître qui s'en suivent, conséquences qui à cause de l'influence de la version Ryleienne du dualisme cartésien sont restées largement ignorées dans les débats anglo-américains récents. This paper examines Descartes's view of man and the understanding involved (...)
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  33. Lilli Alanen (1988). The Foundations of Modality and Conceivability in Descartes and His Predecessors. In Simo Knuuttila (ed.), Modern Modalities: Studies of the History of Modal Theories From Medieval Nominalism to Logical Positivism. Kluwer. 1-69.
    Descartes's view of modality is analyzed by contrast to two earlier models: the ancient realist one, defended by Boethius, where possibility and necessity are connected to natural potency, and the modern intensionalist one, which dissociates necessary and possible truths from any ontological foundation, treating them as conceptual, a priori given preconditions for any intellect. The emergence of this view is traced from Gilbert of Poitiers to duns Scotus, Ockham and Suarez. The Cartesian theory of the creation of eternal truths, it (...)
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  34. Lilli Alanen (1982). Studies in Cartesian Epistemology and Philosophy of Mind. Distributed by Akateeminen Kirjakauppa.
  35. Lilli K. Alanen (1992). Thought-Talk: Descartes and Sellars on Intentionality. American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (1):19-34.
  36. Peter Albano (2000). The Cogito, Human Self-Assertion, and the Modern World. Philosophy Today 44 (2):184-189.
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  37. Tamara Albertini (2005). Crisis and Certainty of Knowledge in Al-Ghazali (1058-1111) and Descartes (1596-1650). Philosophy East and West 55 (1):1-14.
    : In his autobiographical account, the Munqidh min al-Dalāl, al-Ghazālī reflects on his conversion from skepticism to faith. Previous scholarship has interpreted this text as an anticipation of Cartesian positions regarding epistemic certainty. Although the existing similarities between al-Ghazālī and Descartes are striking, the focus of the present essay lies on the different philosophical aims pursued by the two thinkers. It is thus argued that al-Ghazālī operates with a broader notion of the Self than Descartes, because it is inclusive of (...)
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  38. Michael Albrecht, M. Enders & J. Szaif (2006). Wahrheitsbegriffe von Descartes Bis Kant. In Markus Enders & Jan Szaif (eds.), Die Geschichte des Philosophischen Begriffs der Wahrheit. De Gruyter. 231--250.
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  39. Ramon Alcoberro I. Pericay (2008). El Racionalisme Cartesià. Editorial Uoc.
    Ser modern és ser racionalista. Aquest llibre repassa amb detall les tesis de Descartes, la seva relació amb els contemporanis i les conseqüències de les seves teories.
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  40. Virgil C. Aldrich (1937). Descartes' Method of Doubt. Philosophy of Science 4 (4):395-411.
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  41. Branko Aleksic (1999). Sources d'Héraclite chez Descartes. Revue de Philosophie Ancienne 17 (2):91-108.
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  42. Denis Alexander & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.) (2010). Biology and Ideology From Descartes to Dawkins. The University of Chicago Press.
    An accessible survey, this collection will enlighten historians of science, their students, practicing scientists, and anyone interested in the relationship ...
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  43. Vlad Alexandrescu (2007). Descartes and Pascal on the Eucharist. Perspectives on Science 15 (4):434-449.
    Within Descartes' philosophy, the problem of the Eucharist provides scholars the occasion to investigate a nexus of questions belonging to different domains of his thought. In taking up this problem, about which there has been much written in the past few decades , I hope first of all to discern some order in the texts themselves, as well also as in their various interpretations, and then, from there, to propose a new perspective.
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  44. Edwin B. Allaire (1966). The Circle of Ideas and the Circularity of the Meditations. Dialogue 5 (02):131-153.
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  45. Edwin B. Allaire (1964). The Attack on Substance: Descartes to Hume. Dialogue 3 (03):284-287.
  46. Guy-H. Allard (1966). Le Contenu du Cogito augustinien. Dialogue 4 (04):465-475.
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  47. Jean-Louis Allard (1974). Descartes' Philosophy of Nature. Par James Collins. (American Philosophical Quarterly, Monograph No. 5), Oxford, Blackwell, 1971. Viii, 99 Pages. $6.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 13 (01):179-180.
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  48. Prudence Allen Sr (1990). Descartes, The Concept of Woman and the French Revolution. Social Philosophy Today 3:61-78.
  49. Keith Allen (2008). Mechanism, Resemblance and Secondary Qualities: From Descartes to Locke. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):273 – 291.
    Locke’s argument for the primary-secondary quality distinction is compared with Descartes’s argument (in the Principles of Philosophy) for the distinction between mechanical modifications and sensible qualities. I argue that following Descartes, Locke’s argument for the primary-secondary quality distinction is an essentially a priori argument, based on our conception of substance, and the constraints on intelligible bodily interaction that this conception of substance sets.
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  50. Sean Allen-Hermanson (2008). Desgabets: Rationalist or Cartesian Empiricist? In Jon Miller (ed.), Topics in Early Modern Philosophy of Mind (Springer).
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