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  1. Torin Alter (2000). On Racist Symbols and Reparations. Social Theory and Practice 26 (1):153-171.
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  2. Robert V. Andelson (1978). Black Reparations: A Study in Gray. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 59 (2):173.
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  3. John Arthur (2007). Race, Equality, and the Burdens of History. Cambridge University Press.
    John Arthur philosophically addresses the problems of racism and the legacy of past racial discrimination in the United States. Offering a thorough analysis of the concepts of race and racism, Arthur also discusses racial equality, poverty and race, reparations and affirmative action, and merit in ways that cut across the usual political lines. A philosopher, former civil-rights plaintiff and professor at an historically black college in the South, Arthur draws on both his personal experiences as well as his rigorous philosophical (...)
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  4. Lawrie Balfour (2010). Act & Fact: Slavery Reparations as a Democratic Politics of Reconciliation. In Will Kymlicka & Bashir Bashir (eds.), The Politics of Reconciliation in Multicultural Societies. OUP Oxford
  5. Lawrie Balfour (2005). Reparations After Identity Politics. Political Theory 33 (6):786 - 811.
    The end of the twentieth century witnessed a resurgence of demands for reparations for slavery and segregation in the United States. At the same time, a chorus of prominent political theorists warned against the threat "identity politics" poses for democratic politics. This essay considers whether it is possible to construct an argument for reparations that responds to these concerns, particularly as they are articulated by Wendy Brown. To do so, I explore how Brown's analysis of the dangers of political organizing (...)
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  6. Carolyn Benson (2007). Further Trouble for Unsettled Waters: Attention to Gender in the Debate on Black Reparations. In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press 130.
  7. Walter Block (2002). On Reparations to Blacks for Slavery. Human Rights Review 3 (4):53-73.
  8. David Boonin (2011). Should Race Matter?: Unusual Answers to the Usual Questions. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Thinking in black and white; 2. Repairing the slave reparations debate; 3. Advancing the slave reparations debate; 4. One cheer for affirmative action; 5. Two cheers for affirmative action; 6. Why I used to hate hate speech restrictions; 7. Why I still hate hate speech restrictions; 8. How to stop worrying and learn to love hate crime laws; 9. How to keep on loving hate crime laws; 10. Is racial profiling irrational?; 11. Is racial profiling (...)
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  9. Bernard Boxill (forthcoming). Black Reparations. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  10. Bernard Boxill (2014). Compensation and Past Injustice. In Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher H. Wellman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley Blackwell 22--191.
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  11. Bernard Boxill (2009). Review of Jon Miller, Rahul Kumar (Eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (2).
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  12. Bernard R. Boxill (2003). A Lockean Argument for Black Reparations. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):63-91.
    This is a defense of black reparations using the theory of reparations set out in John Locke''s The Second Treatise of Government. I develop two main arguments, what I call the ``inheritance argument'''' and the ``counterfactual argument,''''both of which have been thought to fail. In no case do I appeal to the false ideas that present day United States citizens are guilty of slavery or must pay reparation simply because the U.S. Government was once complicit in the crime.
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  13. Bernard R. Boxill (2003). The Morality of Reparations II. In Tommy Lee Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.), A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Blackwell Pub.
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  14. Bernard R. Boxill (1972). The Morality of Reparation. Social Theory and Practice 2 (1):113-123.
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  15. M. Caputi (2008). Books in Review: Psychology and the Natural Law of Reparation, by C. Fred Alford. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006. 171 Pp. $75.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Political Theory 37 (2):313-315.
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  16. Angelo J. Corlett (2010). Heirs of Oppression: Racism and Reparations. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Packing his case with moral argument and relevant facts, Angelo Corlett offers the most comprehensive defense to date in favor of reparations for African Americans and American Indians. As Corlett see it, the heirs of oppression are both the descendants of the oppressors and the descendants of their victims. Corlett delves deeply into the philosophically related issues of collective responsibility, forgiveness and apology, and reparations as a human right in ways that no other book or article to date has done.
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  17. J. Angelo Corlett (2005). Race, Racism, and Reparations. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (4):568–585.
  18. Derrick Darby (2010). Reparations and Racial Inequality. Philosophy Compass 5 (1):55-66.
    A recent development in philosophical scholarship on reparations for black chattel slavery and Jim Crow segregation is reliance upon social science in normative arguments for reparations. Although there are certainly positive things to be said in favor of an empirically informed normative argument for black reparations, given the depth of empirical disagreement about the causes of persistent racial inequalities, and the ethos of 'post-racial' America, the strongest normative argument for reparations may be one that goes through irrespective of how we (...)
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  19. Derrick Darby, Educational Inequality and the Science of Diversity in Grutter: A Lesson for the Reparations Debate in the Age of Obama.
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  20. Manuel Davenport (1999). Racist Symbols and Reparations. Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (2):113-114.
  21. Matthew Digges (2012). Take Off Your Shoes, Walk on the Ground: The Journey Towards Reconciliation in Australia [Book Review]. The Australasian Catholic Record 89 (2):255.
    Digges, Matthew Review(s) of: Take off your shoes, walk on the ground: The journey towards reconciliation in Australia, by Lyn Henderson-Yates, Brian McCoy SJ, Melissa Brickell, Catholic Social Justice Series No 71, Alexandria NSW: Australian Catholic Social Justice Council, 2012, pp.32, $6.60.
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  22. Douglas Ficek (2002). Rawls, Race, and Reparations. Radical Philosophy Review 5 (1/2):1-9.
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  23. Robert K. Fullinwider (2004). The Reparations Argument: A Reply. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):256–263.
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  24. Robert K. Fullinwider (2000). THE CASE FOR REPARATIONS. Report From the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy 20 (2):1-8.
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  25. Ori J. Herstein (2009). Historic Injustice, Group Membership and Harm to Individuals: Defending Claims for Historic Justice From the Non-Identity Problem. Harvard Journal of Racial and Ethnic Justice 25:229.
    Some claim slavery did not harm the descendants of slaves since, without slavery, its descendants would never have been born and a life worth living, even one including the subsequent harms of past slavery, is preferable to never having been born at all. This creates a classic puzzle known as the non-identity argument, applied to reject the validity of claims for historic justice based on harms to descendants of victims of historic wrongs: since descendants are never harmed by historic wrongs, (...)
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  26. Paul M. Hughes (2004). Rectification and Reparation: What Does Citizen Responsibility Require? Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):244–255.
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  27. Jonathan Kaplan & Andrew Valls (2007). Housing Discrimination As a Basis for Black Reparations. Public Affairs Quarterly 21 (3):255-274.
    The renewed interest in the issue of black reparations, both in the public sphere and among scholars, is a welcome development because the racial injustices of the past continue to shape American society by disadvantaging African Americans in a variety of ways. Attention to the past and how it has shaped present-day inequality seems essential both to understanding our predicament and to justifying policies that would address and undermine racial inequality. Given this, any argument for policies designed to pursue racial (...)
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  28. Stephen Kershnar (2001). The Case Against Reparations. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (1):41-46.
    George Schedler raises interesting issues with regard to the amount of reparations owed for slavery, the parties who are owed reparations, and the standard for these reparations. His arguments, however, do not hold up upon analysis. His analysis of the case for the descendants of slaves being owed compensation seriously overestimates the case for such reparations. He does not identify the grounds for such compensation, i.e., either stolen inheritance or the descendants’ trustee-like control over the slave’s estate, and this results (...)
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  29. Chandran Kukathas (2006). Who? Whom? Reparations and the Problem of Agency. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):330–341.
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  30. Alice MacLachlan (2007). The Object of Repair: Commentary on Margaret Urban Walker’s ‘Restorative Justice and Reparations'. Symposium on Race, Gender and Philosophy 3 (2).
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  31. Thomas McCarthy (2004). Coming to Terms with Our Past, Part II: On the Morality and Politics of Reparations for Slavery. Political Theory 32 (6):750-772.
    There has recently been a surge of interest, theoretical and political, in reparations for slavery. This essay takes up several moral-political issues from that intensifying debate: how to conceptualize and justify collective compensation and collective responsibility, and how to establish a plausible connection between past racial injustices and present racial inequalities. It concludes with some brief remarks on one aspect of the very complicated politics of reparations: the possible effects of hearings and trials on the public memory and political culture (...)
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  32. Howard Mcgary (2010). Reconciliation and Reparations. Metaphilosophy 41 (4):546-562.
    Abstract: This article provides an account of the meaning of reparations and presents a brief explanation as to why African Americans believe they are entitled to reparations from the United States government. It then goes on to explain why reparations are necessary to address the distrust that is thought to exist between many African Americans and their government. Finally, it rejects the belief that reparations require reconciliation.
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  33. Howard McGary (2003). Achieving Democratic Equality: Forgiveness, Reconciliation, and Reparations. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):93-113.
    This paper provides an account of reparations in general and then presents briefly one explanation of why many present day African Americans believe they are entitled to reparations from the U.S. Government.This explanation should not be seen as a final justification, but only as an indication why the demand for reparations for AfricanAmericans might be seen a plausible. Next, if it is reasonable to assume that reparations to African Americans are plausible, I then go onto explain why reparations might be (...)
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  34. Howard Mcgary (1977). Justice and Reparations. Philosophical Forum 9 (2):250.
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  35. Dale E. Miller (2005). Reparations for Emancipation: Mill's Vindication of the Rights of Slave Owners. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (2):245-265.
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  36. Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.) (2007). Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press.
    Reparations is an idea whose time has come. From civilian victims of war in Iraq and South America to descendents of slaves in the US to citizens of colonized nations in Africa and south Asia to indigenous peoples around the world--these groups and their advocates are increasingly arguing for the importance of addressing historical injustices that have long been either ignored or denied. This volume contributes to these debates by focusing the attention of a group of highly distinguished international experts (...)
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  37. Dennis A. Rohatyn (1979). Black Reparations: A Black and White Issue? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 60 (4):433.
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  38. George Schedler (2007). Should There Be an Apology for American Slavery? Should There Be an Apology for American Slavery? 21 (2):125-148.
    Contemporary white Americans cannot meaningfully ask forgiveness from present-day African Americans for slavery, because such a group apology does not have the mental state needed to communicate regret and intend that listeners forgive the group. Even if the requisite mental state were present, contemporary white Americans are not responsible for the wrong and cannot apologize for wrongs for which they are not responsible. Additionally, such a purported apology is not directed to the victims of the wrong but instead seeks forgiveness (...)
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  39. George Schedler (2003). Should the Federal Government Pay Reparations for Slavery? Social Theory and Practice 29 (4):567-588.
  40. George Schedlerf (2002). Principles for Measuring the Damages of American Slavery. Public Affairs Quarterly, 16 (4):377-404.
    Either slavery has done no measurable damage to the descendants of slaves, or. if it has. that there are no individuals in the present generation who are obligated to make payments to them,though the federal government may be responsible for a portion of the damages.
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  41. Seana Valentine Shiffrin (2009). Reparations for U.S. Slavery and Justice Over Time. In David Wasserman & Melinda Roberts (eds.), Harming Future Persons. Springer
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  42. J. P. Sterba (2005). Review: Race, Racism, and Reparations. [REVIEW] Mind 114 (454):407-409.
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  43. Paul C. Taylor (2005). Three Questions About Race, Racism, and Reparations. Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (4):559–567.
  44. Andrew Valls (2007). Reconsidering the Case for Black Reparations. In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. OUP Oxford
  45. Stephen Winter (2006). Uncertain Justice: History and Reparations. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):342–359.
  46. Naomi Zack (2003). Reparations and the Rectification of Race. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):139-151.
    Positive law and problems with identifyingbeneficiaries confine reparations for U.S.slavery to the level of discourse. Within thediscourse, the broader topic of rectificationcan be addressed. The rectification of slaveryincludes restoring full humanity to our ideasof the slaves and their descendants and itrequires disabuse of the false biological ideaof race. This is not racial eliminativism,because biological race never existed, but moreimportantly because African American racialidentities and redress of present racism arebased on lifeworlds of race in contrast withwhich the biological idea has been (...)
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