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Siblings:History/traditions: Republicanism
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  1. Laura Andronache (2006). A National Identity Republicanism? European Journal of Political Theory 5 (4):399-414.
    This article attempts to bring into discussion concepts from contemporary theories of republicanism from the vantage point of the particular theory of republican citizenship advocated by David Miller, and based on national identity. It emerges from the discussion of his notions of national identity and republican citizenship that he works with two parallel notions of political obligation: one that can be intimated from Miller’s Rousseauian vision of a political community as a community of common will, and another that can be (...)
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  2. Hilliard Aronovitch (2000). From Communitarianism to Republicanism: On Sandel and His Critics. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (4):621-647.
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  3. Serge Audier (2007). The Return of Tocqueville in Contemporary Political Thought : Individualism, Associationism, Republicanism. In Raf Geenens & Annelien de Dijn (eds.), Reading Tocqueville: From Oracle to Actor. Palgrave Macmillan. 71.
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  4. Brian S. Baigrie (1995). Fuller's Civic Republicanism and the Question of Scientific Expertise. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (4):502-511.
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  5. F. Baluch (2014). Arendt's Machiavellian Moment. European Journal of Political Theory 13 (2):154-177.
    In this article, I offer a reassessment of the influence of two disparate bodies of thought – republicanism and existentialism – on Hannah Arendt. Arendt, I argue, is not involved in an ‘agonistic appropriation’ of Heidegger. Arendt identifies two opposed attitudes in Heidegger’s work. The first Promethean moment places Heidegger squarely in the tradition of Western political philosophy, and the second seemingly correcting for this recommends a quietism. Arendt rejects both these attitudes. Machiavelli rather than Heidegger, I argue, is the (...)
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  6. John Beaudoin (2004). Republicanism. Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (2):281-284.
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  7. Duncan Bell (2010). Introduction Symposium: Republicanism and Global Justice. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (1):9-11.
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  8. André Berten (2007). A epistemologia holista-individualista e o republicanismo liberal de Philip Pettit. Kriterion 48 (115):9-31.
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  9. Heiner Bielefeldt (1997). Autonomy and Republicanism: Immanuel Kant's Philosophy of Freedom. Political Theory 25 (4):524-558.
  10. Greg Bird & Jonathan Short (2013). Community, Immunity, and the Proper an Introduction to the Political Theory of Roberto Esposito. Angelaki 18 (3):1-12.
  11. Gisela Bock, Quentin Skinner & Maurizio Viroli (eds.) (1990). Machiavelli and Republicanism. Cambridge University Press.
    This highly acclaimed volume brings together some of the world's foremost historians of ideas to consider Machiavelli's political thought in the larger context of the European republican tradition, and the image of Machiavelli held by other republicans. An international team of scholars from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds (notably law, philosophy, history and the history of political thought) explore both the immediate Florentine context in which Machiavelli wrote, and the republican legacy to which he contributed.
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  12. James Bohman (2012). Critical Theory, Republicanism, and the Priority of Injustice: Transnational Republicanism as a Nonideal Theory. Journal of Social Philosophy 43 (2):97-112.
  13. James Bohman (2001). Cosmopolitan Republicanism. The Monist 84 (1):3-21.
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  14. Alain Boyer (2001). On the Modern Relevance of Old Republicanism. The Monist 84 (1):22-44.
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  15. Geoffrey Brennan & Loren Lomasky (2006). Against Reviving Republicanism. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (2):221-252.
    University of Virginia, USA, lel3f{at}virginia.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> The strategy of this article is to consider republicanism in contrast with liberalism. We focus on three aspects of this contrast: republicanism’s emphasis on ‘social goods’ under various conceptualizations of that category; republicanism’s emphasis on political participation as an essential element of the ‘good life’; and republicanism’s distinctive understanding of freedom (following the lines developed by Pettit). In each case, we are skeptical that what republicanism (...)
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  16. C. Brown (2008). Book in Review: Bounding Power: Republican Security Theory From the Polis to the Global Village, by Daniel H. Deudney. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2007. 384 Pp. $35.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Political Theory 36 (4):647-650.
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  17. John Christman (1998). Philip Pettit, Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and Government:Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and Government. Ethics 109 (1):202-206.
  18. Emilios A. Christodoulidis (1993). Self-Defeating Civic Republicanism. Ratio Juris 6 (1):64-85.
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  19. R. J. G. Claassen (2009). New Directions for the Capability Approach: Deliberative Democracy and Republicanism. Res Publica 15 (4):421-428.
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  20. C. A. J. Coady (2001). Critical Notice of Republicanism by Philip Pettit. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (1):119 – 124.
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  21. Alan M. S. J. Coffee (2013). Freedom as Independence: Mary Wollstonecraft and the Grand Blessing of Life. Hypatia (1).
    Independence is a central and recurring theme in Wollstonecraft’s work. Independence should not be understood as an individualistic ideal that is in tension with the value of community but as an essential ingredient in successful and flourishing social relationships. I examine three aspects of this rich and complex concept that Wollstonecraft draws on as she develops her own notion of independence as a powerful feminist tool. First, independence is an egalitarian ideal that requires that all individuals, regardless of sex, are (...)
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  22. Alan M. S. J. Coffee (2013). Two Spheres of Domination: Republican Theory, Social Norms and the Insufficiency of Negative Freedom. Contemporary Political Theory.
    Republicans understand freedom as the guaranteed protection against any arbitrary use of coercive power. This freedom is exercised within a political community, and the concept of arbitrariness is defined with reference to the actual ideas of its citizens about what is in their shared interests. According to many current defenders of the republican model, this form of freedom is understood in strictly negative terms representing an absence of domination. I argue that this assumption is misguided. First, it is internally inconsistent. (...)
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  23. Alan M. S. J. Coffee (2012). Mary Wollstonecraft, Freedom and the Enduring Power of Social Domination. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (2):116-135.
    Even long after their formal exclusion has come to an end, members of previously oppressed social groups often continue to face disproportionate restrictions on their freedom, as the experience of many women over the last century has shown. Working within in a framework in which freedom is understood as independence from arbitrary power, Mary Wollstonecraft provides an explanation of why such domination may persist and offers a model through which it can be addressed. Republicans rely on processes of rational public (...)
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  24. Alan M. S. J. Coffee (2009). Republicanism and Political Theory, Edited by Cécile Laborde and John Maynor. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):323-327.
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  25. Alan M. S. J. Coffee (2008). Inclusivity and Equality: Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion in Republican Society. Politics in Central Europe 4 (2):26-40.
    Balancing citizens’ freedom thought, conscience and religion with the authority of the law which applies to all citizens alike presents an especial challenge for the governments of European nations with socially diverse and pluralistic populations. I address this problem from within the republican tradition represented by Machiavelli, Harrington and Madison. Republicans have historically focused on public debate as the means to identify a set of shared interests which the law should uphold in the interests of all. Within pluralistic societies, however, (...)
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  26. Jean L. Cohen (1996). Rights and Citizenship, and the Modern Form of the Social: Dilemmas of Arendtian Republicanism. Constellations 3 (2):164-189.
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  27. Marcia L. Colish (1999). Republicanism, Religion, and Machiavelli's Savonarolan Moment. Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (4):597-616.
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  28. M. Victoria Costa (2009). Neo-Republicanism, Freedom as Non-Domination, and Citizen Virtue. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (4):401-419.
    This article discusses Philip Pettit’s neo-republicanism in light of the criterion of self-sustenance: the requirement that a political theory be capable of serving as a self-sustaining public philosophy for a pluralist democracy. It argues that this criterion can only be satisfied by developing an adequate politics of virtue. Pettit’s theory is built around the notion of freedom as non-domination, and he does not say much about the virtues of citizens or the policies the state may employ to encourage their development. (...)
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  29. M. Victoria Costa (2009). Neo-Republicanism, Freedom as Non-Domination, and Citizen Virtue. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (4):401-419.
  30. Nicholas Crosson (2005). Corporations, Democratic Legitimacy, and Republicanism. Journal of Philosophical Research 30 (Supplement):189-198.
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  31. Richard Dagger (2011). Martí , José Luis , and Pettit , Philip . A Political Philosophy in Public Life: Civic Republicanism in Zapatero's Spain . Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2010. Pp. 198. $29.95 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (4):816-820.
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  32. Richard Dagger (2006). Neo-Republicanism and the Civic Economy. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (2):151-173.
    It is clear that a revival of republicanism is under way, but it is not clear that the republican tradition truly speaks to contemporary concerns. In particular, it is not clear that republicanism has anything of value to say about economic matters in the early 21st century. I respond to this worry by delineating the main features of a neo-republican civic economy that is, I argue, reasonably coherent and attractive. Such an economy will preserve the market, while constraining it to (...)
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  33. Richard Dagger (2001). Republicanism and the Politics of Place. Philosophical Explorations 4 (3):157 – 173.
    Republicanism may seem to be a nostalgic politics of place that is incapable of responding to the challenges of globalization.The burden of this essay is to demonstrate that this view is both right and wrong - right in regarding republicanism as a politics of place, butwrong in thinking that such a form of politics is irrelevant to an increasingly interconnected world. On the contrary, the republican concern for place provides the basis for the responsible, public-spirited action that cosmopolitan theorists need (...)
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  34. Boudewijn de Bruin (2009). Liberal and Republican Freedom. Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (4):418-439.
    This paper argues that liberal freedom (non-interference) is epistemologically prior to republican freedom (non-domination). I start investigate three relations between liberal and republican freedom: (i) Logical Equivalence, or the question whether republican freedom entails liberal freedom (and vice versa); (ii) Degree Supervenience, or whether changes in the degree (amount, quantity) of republican freedom are mirrored by changes in the degree of liberal freedom (and vice versa); and (iii) Epistemological Priority, that is, whether knowledge about arrangements of republican freedom presupposes knowledge (...)
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  35. Vir Die Verskil Tussen Die Klassieke (2010). Die Renaissance En Die Moderne Republikanisme, Sien Die Uitstekende Idee-Historiese En Semantiese Analise van Die Begrippe “Republiek” En “Republikeins” Deur J. Hankins,'Exclusivist Republicanism and the Non-Monarchical Republic'. Political Theory 38 (4).
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  36. Maria Dimova-Cookson (2010). Republicanism, Philosophy of Freedom and the History of Ideas: An Interview with Philip Pettit. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (4):477.
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  37. Andrew Dobson (2005). Spinoza and Republicanism. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (4):471-472.
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  38. Chris Durante (2009). Republicanism in Bioethics? American Journal of Bioethics 9 (2):55 – 56.
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  39. David Elstein (2011). Han Feizi's Thought and Republicanism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):167-185.
    Feizi’s philosophy is usually represented as an amoral autocracy where the ruler is the sole political power and runs the state by controlling the people through rewards and punishments. While his system is formally autocratic, this article argues that the purpose behind this system bears some similarity to the republican political ideal of non-domination. In this interpretation, Han Feizi makes the ruler the sole power to mitigate the danger of the state being dominated by ministers. He does not employ republican (...)
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  40. João Feres (2006). Building a Typology of Forms of Misrecognition: Beyond the Republican-Hegelian Paradigm. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (3):259-277.
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  41. Jo|[Atilde]|O. Feres (2006). Building a Typology of Forms of Misrecognition: Beyond the Republican-Hegelian Paradigm. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (3):259.
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  42. Markus Fischer (2006). Prologue: Machiavelli's Rapacious Republicanism. In Paul Anthony Rahe (ed.), Machiavelli's Liberal Republican Legacy. Cambridge University Press.
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  43. Michael Freeden (2005). Spinoza and Republicanism. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (4):471.
  44. Alex Gourevitch (2013). Labor Republicanism and the Transformation of Work. Political Theory 41 (4):0090591713485370.
    In the nineteenth century a group of “labor republicans” argued that the system of wage-labor should be replaced by a system of cooperative production. This system of cooperative production would realize republican liberty in economic, not just political, life. Today, neo-republicans argue that the republican theory of liberty only requires a universal basic income. A non-dominated ability to exit is sufficient to guarantee free labor. This essay reconstructs the more radical, labor republican view and defends it against the prevailing the (...)
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  45. Alex Gourevitch (2011). Labor and Republican Liberty. Constellations 18 (3):431-454.
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  46. Griswold Jr (1990). Book Review:The Spirit of Modern Republicanism: The Moral Vision of the American Founders and the Philosophy of Locke. Thomas L. Pangle. [REVIEW] Ethics 101 (1):197-.
  47. Griswold Jr (1990). Book Review:The Spirit of Modern Republicanism: The Moral Vision of the American Founders and the Philosophy of Locke. Thomas L. Pangle. [REVIEW] Ethics 101 (1):197-.
  48. Lena Halldenius (2010). Building Blocks of a Republican Cosmopolitanism The Modality of Being Free. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (1):12-30.
    A structural affinity between republican freedom as non-domination and human rights claims accounts for the relevance of republicanism for cosmopolitan concerns. Central features of republican freedom are its institution dependence and the modal aspect it adds to being free. Its chief concern is not constraint, but the way in which an agent is constrained or not. To the extent I am vulnerable to someone’s dispositional power over me I am not free, even if I am not in fact constrained. Republican (...)
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  49. Alastair Hamilton (2007). Machiavelli and Empire. By Mikael hörnqvistMachiavelli, Hobbes, and the Formation of a Liberal Republicanism in England. By Vickie B. Sullivanmachiavelli's Liberal Republican Legacy. Edited by Paul A. Rahe. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (6):1000–1001.
  50. James Hankins (2010). Exclusivist Republicanism and the Non-Monarchical Republic. Political Theory 38 (4):452 - 482.
    The idea that a republic is the only legitimate form of government and that non-elective monarchy and hereditary political privileges are by definition illegitimate is an artifact of late eighteenth century republicanism, though it has roots in the "godly republics" of the seventeenth century. It presupposes understanding a republic (respublica) to be a non-monarchical form of government. The latter definition is a discursive practice that goes back only to the fifteenth century and is not found in Roman or medieval sources. (...)
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