Related categories
Siblings:
135 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 135
  1. John Alexander (2011). Sweatshops, Context Differentiation, and the Rational Person Standard. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 18 (1):68-74.
    In making decisions regardmg what to do, people should employ plausible moral standards to defend what they think is morally permissible. One plausible moral standard that is often used is what I refer to as the Rational Person Standard: we, as rational agents, ought to choose the option that has the greatest benefit for us, under the constraint that what we choose does not unfairly limit other people from choosing what they think is best for them. Another way to phrase (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Stephen H. Allen (1915). The Moral Responsibility for Wars. International Journal of Ethics 26 (1):72-81.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Kenneth D. Alpern (1983). Moral Responsibility for Engineers. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 2 (2):39-48.
  4. Mark Alznauer (2008). Hegel on Legal and Moral Responsibility. Inquiry 51 (4):365 – 389.
    When Hegel first addresses moral responsibility in the Philosophy of Right, he presupposes that agents are only responsible for what they intended to do, but appears to offer little, if any, justification for this assumption. In this essay, I claim that the first part of the Philosophy of Right, “Abstract Right”, contains an implicit argument that legal or external responsibility (blame for what we have done) is conceptually dependent on moral responsibility proper (blame for what we have intended). This overlooked (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Barbara Applebaum (2005). In the Name of Morality: Moral Responsibility, Whiteness and Social Justice Education. Journal of Moral Education 34 (3):277-290.
    This paper argues that the ?traditional conception of moral responsibility? authorizes and supports denials of white complicity. First, what is meant by the ?traditional conception of moral responsibility? is delineated and the enabling and disenabling characteristics of this view are highlighted. Then, three seemingly good, antiracist discourses that white students often engage in are discussed ? the discourse of colour?blindness, the discourse of meritocracy and the discourse of individual choice ? and analysed to show how they are all grounded in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Barbara Applebaum (1997). Good Liberal Intentions Are Not Enough! Racism, Intentions and Moral Responsibility. Journal of Moral Education 26 (4):409-421.
    Abstract The relationship of intention to moral responsibility in contemporary notions of racism is explored. It is argued that, although the moral import of efforts to reveal and recognise dominance in western society is to be lauded, the peripheral role attributed to intentions in ascriptions of racism can be counterproductive to the aim of helping dominant group members acknowledge their embeddedness in a culture which oppresses others.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ann Elisabeth Auhagen & Hans Werner Bierhoff (eds.) (2001). Responsibility: The Many Faces of a Social Phenomenon. Routledge.
    This important new volume argues that responsibility is a characteristic of fundamental importance for the survival of modern democratic structures. It represents a comprehensive collection of cutting-edge psychological, philosophical, sociological and evolutionary approaches to the topic.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Andrew Belsey (1978). The Moral Responsibility of the Scientist. Philosophy 53 (203):113 - 118.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Martin Benjamin (1998). Why Blame the Organization? A Pragmatic Analysis of Collective Moral Responsibility. Teaching Philosophy 21 (2):201-204.
  10. Douglas Birsch (2004). Moral Responsibility for Harm Caused by Computer System Failures. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (4):233-245.
    When software is written and then utilized in complex computer systems, problems often occur. Sometimes these problems cause a system to malfunction, and in some instances such malfunctions cause harm. Should any of the persons involved in creating the software be blamed and punished when a computer system failure leads to persons being harmed? In order to decide whether such blame and punishment are appropriate, we need to first consider if the people are “morally responsible”. Should any of the people (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John D. Bishop (1991). The Moral Responsibility of Corporate Executives for Disasters. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (5):377 - 383.
    This paper examines whether or not senior corporate executives are morally responsible for disasters which result from corporate activities. The discussion is limited to the case in which the information needed to prevent the disaster is present within the corporation, but fails to reach senior executives. The failure of information to reach executives is usually a result of negative information blockage, a phenomenon caused by the differing roles of constraints and goals within corporations. Executives should be held professionally responsible not (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. John R. Boatright (2007). Reluctant Guardians: The Moral Responsibility of Gatekeepers. Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (4):613-632.
    Intermediaries, such as accountants, lawyers, and bankers, are gatekeepers, which are parties whose cooperation is necessary for corporations to function and who, by withholding cooperation, are able to prevent significant corporate misconduct. The recent scandals at Enron and other corporations were due, in part, to failures by gatekeeper institutions. However, intermediaries exist primarily to provide for-fee services and not specifically to detect and deter misconduct. Insofar asthese institutions are gatekeepers or guardians, they serve reluctantly. Hence the question: What is the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Simone Burg & Anke Gorp (2005). Understanding Moral Responsibility in the Design of Trailers. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (2):235-256.
    This paper starts from the presupposition that moral codes often do not suffice to make agents understand their moral responsibility. We will illustrate this statement with a concrete example of engineers who design a truck’s trailer and who do not think traffic safety is part of their responsibility. This opinion clashes with a common supposition that designers in fact should do all that is in their power to ensure safety in traffic. In our opinion this shows the need for a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. A. M. Buyx (2008). Personal Responsibility for Health as a Rationing Criterion: Why We Don't Like It and Why Maybe We Should. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):871-874.
    Whether it is fair to use personal responsibility of patients for their own health as a rationing criterion in healthcare is a controversial matter. A host of difficulties are associated with the concept of personal responsibility in the field of medicine. These include, in particular, theoretical considerations of justice and such practical issues as multiple causal factors in medicine and freedom of health behaviour. In the article, personal responsibility is evaluated from the perspective of several theories of justice. It is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. John S. Callender (2010). Free Will and Responsibility. A Guide for Practitioners. Oxford University Press.
    This book is aimed primarily at the practitioners of morals such as psychiatrists,lawyers and policy-makers. My professional background is clinical psychiatry It is divided into three parts. The first of these provides an overview of moral theory, morality in non-human species and recent developments in neuroscience that are of relevance to moral and legal responsibility. In the second part I offer a new paradigm of free action based on the overlaps between free will, moral value and art. In the overlap (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. David Carr (2000). Reason, Fantasy and Moral Responsibility: A Psycho-Philosophical Motif in the Work of John Wilson. Journal of Moral Education 29 (3):285-299.
    A constantly reworked theme in the work of John Wilson is that of some identity or overlap of (psycho) therapeutic concerns with those of more conventional learning and education: (some) instances of therapy are held to coincide with (some) instances of education à propos the alleviation of what he generally calls ''fantasies''. In an early celebrated article, Wilson casts certain aspects of education as such in this therapeutic role, but in later work it is philosophical education which is credited with (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Christine Chwaszcza (2007). Moral Responsibility and Global Justice: A Human Rights Approach. Nomos.
  18. Ralph W. Clark (1984). Freedom, Autonomy, and Moral Responsibility. New Scholasticism 58 (4):475-482.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Mark Coeckelbergh (2012). Moral Responsibility, Technology, and Experiences of the Tragic: From Kierkegaard to Offshore Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):35-48.
    The standard response to engineering disasters like the Deepwater Horizon case is to ascribe full moral responsibility to individuals and to collectives treated as individuals. However, this approach is inappropriate since concrete action and experience in engineering contexts seldom meets the criteria of our traditional moral theories. Technological action is often distributed rather than individual or collective, we lack full control of the technology and its consequences, and we lack knowledge and are uncertain about these consequences. In this paper, I (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Mark Coeckelbergh (2009). Virtual Moral Agency, Virtual Moral Responsibility: On the Moral Significance of the Appearance, Perception, and Performance of Artificial Agents. [REVIEW] AI and Society 24 (2):181-189.
  21. Kari Gwen Coleman, Computing and Moral Responsibility. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Neta C. Crawford (2007). Individual and Collective Moral Responsibility for Systemic Military Atrocity. Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (2):187–212.
  23. Timothy Paul Cronan & Sulaiman Al-Rafee (2008). Factors That Influence the Intention to Pirate Software and Media. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (4):527 - 545.
    This study focuses on one of the newer forms of software piracy, known as digital piracy, and uses the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a framework to attempt to determine factors that influence digital piracy (the illegal copying/downloading of copyrighted software and media files). This study examines factors, which could determine an individual’s intention to pirate digital material (software, media, etc.). Past piracy behavior and moral obligation, in addition to the prevailing theories of behavior (Theory of Planned Behavior), were (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Ramon Das (2002). Suffering and Moral Responsibility. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (2):240 – 241.
    Book Information Suffering and Moral Responsibility. Suffering and Moral Responsibility Meyerfeld Jamie New York Oxford University Press ix + 237 Hardback £35 By Meyerfeld Jamie. Oxford University Press. New York. Pp. ix + 237. Hardback:£35.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Michael Davis (2004). Teaching Moral Responsibility Within Organizations: Are We Doing What We Should? Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (3):77-91.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Winston Davis (ed.) (2001). Taking Responsibility: Comparative Perspectives. University Press of Virginia.
    This illuminating collection of essays encompasses conceptions of responsibility around the globe, as discussed by leading scholars in the fields of philosophy, ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Richard T. De George (1982). The Moral Responsibility of the Hospital. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 7 (1):87-100.
    The hospital has legal liability. Does it also have moral responsibility? Is it a moral agent, and if so in what sense? There are two issues involved, one conceptual and the other normative. The conceptual issue is whether a hospital can be morally responsible. If seen not only as a physical facility but as a formal organization, it can be said to act rationally, choose between alternatives, and affect human beings. It thus satisfies die criteria for moral responsibility, even though (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Y. Denier (2010). From Brute Luck to Option Luck? On Genetics, Justice, and Moral Responsibility in Reproduction. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (2):101-129.
    The structure of our ethical experience depends, crucially, on a fundamental distinction between what we are responsible for doing or deciding and what is given to us. As such, the boundary between chance and choice is the spine of our conventional morality, and any serious shift in that boundary is thoroughly dislocating. Against this background, I analyze the way in which techniques of prenatal genetic diagnosis (PGD) pose such a fundamental challenge to our conventional ideas of justice and moral responsibility. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2011). Trust and Responsibility in Sexual Ethics in the Context of HIV/AIDS. SUVIDYA The Journal of Philosophy and Religion 5 (2):105-112.
    Sexual ethics is an important area of discussion in the contemporary ethical debates. The discussions on sexual ethics gained relevance especially in the context of the raise of Global epidemic of HIV/AIDS, which is threatening the human life at large. Trust and Responsibility form the basic pillars of any human relationship including the relation of sexual partners. The present paper discusses the place of ‘trust’ and ‘responsibility’ in the sexual ethics in the context of HIV/AIDS. It argues that only in (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John Dienhart (2009). Principles of Managerial Moral Responsibility. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (4):529-552.
    The purpose of this paper is to formulate and defend a set of moral principles applicable to management. Our motivation is twofold: 1) to increase the coherence and utility of Integrative Social Contracts Theory (ISCT); and 2) to initiate an alternative stream of business ethics research. To those ends, we specify what counts as adequate guidance in navigating the ethical terrain of business. In doing so, a key element of ISCT, Substantive Hypernorms, is found to be flawed beyond repair. So (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Frank Dietrich (2002). Causal Responsibility and Rationing in Medicine. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):113-131.
    The article addresses the issue of rationing health care services, a topic currently being hotly debated in many countries. The author argues that the aspect of causal responsibility ought to play a decisive role in the allocation of limited medical resources. Starting out from Ronald Dworkin's distinction between option luck and brute luck, the appropriate and meaningful uses of the term causal responsibility are clarified first. A discussion of the conditions which might justify giving lower priority to patients whose illnesses (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Gordana Dodig Crnkovic & Daniel Persson (2008). Sharing Moral Responsibility with Robots: A Pragmatic Approach. In Holst, Per Kreuger & Peter Funk (eds.), Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications Volume 173. IOS Press Books.
    Roboethics is a recently developed field of applied ethics which deals with the ethical aspects of technologies such as robots, ambient intelligence, direct neural interfaces and invasive nano-devices and intelligent soft bots. In this article we look specifically at the issue of (moral) responsibility in artificial intelligent systems. We argue for a pragmatic approach, where responsibility is seen as a social regulatory mechanism. We claim that having a system which takes care of certain tasks intelligently, learning from experience and making (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. R. S. Downie (1982). Collective Responsibility in Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 7 (1):43-56.
    There is a widespread assumption that responsibility in health care is vested in the last resort in the individual doctor who is caring for a given patient. In the first section of this article I shall try to bring out the plausibility of this assumption, and examine the concept of collective responsibility which it allows. In the second and third sections I shall try to show the fatal weaknesses of the assumption in its unmodified form, and shall argue that if (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. R. S. Downie (1964). Social Roles and Moral Responsibility. Philosophy 39 (147):29 - 36.
    The concept of moral responsibility has many applications. We speak, for example, of a person's responsibilities, and mean his professional or domestic commitments. In this sense a person can be said to have too many responsibilities, or none at all, and he can be said to be responsible to or for another person. Again, we can speak of the person himself as being responsible or irresponsible, and mean that he is conscientious and trustworthy in the performance of his duties or (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Antony Duff (2009). Legal and Moral Responsibility. Philosophy Compass 4 (6):978-986.
    The paper begins with the plausible view that criminal responsibility should track moral responsibility, and explains its plausibility. A necessary distinction is then drawn between liability and answerability as two dimensions of responsibility, and is shown to underpin the distinction in criminal law between offences and defences. This enables us to distinguish strict liability from strict answerability, and to see that whilst strict criminal liability seems inconsistent with the principle that criminal responsibility should track moral responsibility, strict criminal answerability is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. David Evans (2001). Book Review. Moral Responsibility in the Holocaust: A Study in the Ethics of Character David H. Jones. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (438):485-488.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Linda Eyre (1982/1994). Teaching Your Children Responsibility. Simon & Schuster.
    As a parent, you know how much less stressful your life would be if you could count on your children to be more responsible -for their toys, their homework, their household chores, and their choice of friends. You know you want your children to grow up to be responsible adults. In Teaching Your Children Responsibility , bestselling authors Linda and Richard Eyre show you how to make sure your elementary-school-aged children learn this invaluable lesson. The Eyres identify twelve simple kinds (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jessica Nihlén Fahlquist (2009). Moral Responsibility for Environmental Problems—Individual or Institutional? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (2):109-124.
    The actions performed by individuals, as consumers and citizens, have aggregate negative consequences for the environment. The question asked in this paper is to what extent it is reasonable to hold individuals and institutions responsible for environmental problems. A distinction is made between backward-looking and forward-looking responsibility. Previously, individuals were not seen as being responsible for environmental problems, but an idea that is now sometimes implicitly or explicitly embraced in the public debate on environmental problems is that individuals are appropriate (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Joel Feinberg (1970). Doing & Deserving; Essays in the Theory of Responsibility. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
    Supererogation and rules.--Problematic responsibility in law and morals.--On being "morally speaking a murderer."--Justice and personal desert.--The expressive function of punishment.--Action and responsibility.--Causing voluntary actions.--Sua culpa.--Collective responsibility.--Crime, clutchability, and individuated treatment.--What is so special about mental illness?
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. John Forge (2000). Moral Responsibility and the 'Ignorant Scientist'. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):341-349.
    The question whether a scientist can be responsible for an outcome of her work which she does not foresee, and so is ignorant of, is addressed. It is argued that ignorance can be a ground for the attribution of responsibility, on condition that there are general principles, rules or norms, that the subject should be aware of. It is maintained that there are such rules which inform the practice of science as a social institution.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Peter A. French, Jeffrey Nesteruk & David T. Risser (1992). Corporations in the Moral Community. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich College Publishers.
  42. Joseph S. Fulda (2012). Google Books and Other Internet Mischief. Journal of Information Ethics 21 (2):104-109.
    This article argues for substantial ex–post criminal penalties against purveyors of stolen intellectual property, in lieu of current legislation winding its way through both chambers of the United States Congress. Inter alia, it discusses why such a drastic remedy has proven necessary and what other measures the Congress should consider adopting. It concludes with a sobering discussion of Internet mischief more generally. -/- Note: This is in marked contrast to views expressed in 1999 when civil justice would have sufficed, and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Joseph S. Fulda (1999). In Defense of Charity and Philanthropy. Business and Society Review 104 (2):179-189.
    The article distinguishes between charity and philanthropy and answers those who argue that monies spent for either are an inefficient deployment of monies for present consumption that could better be deployed by investing in the production of future wealth. It closes by arguing that philanthropists provide a key leadership role in the free-market economy. -/- The author owns the copyright, and there was no agreement, express or implied, not to use the publisher's PDF.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Candace Cummins Gauthier (2005). The Virtue of Moral Responsibility and the Obligations of Patients. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (2):153 – 166.
    The American Medical Association has provided a list of patient responsibilities, said to be derived from patient autonomy, without providing any justification for this derivation. In this article, the virtue of moral responsibility is proposed as a way to justify these kinds of limits on respect for individual autonomy. The need for such limits is explained by examining the traditional principles of health care ethics. What is missing in health care decision making, and can be provided by the virtue of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Candace Cummins Gauthier (2002). The Virtue of Moral Responsibility in Healthcare Decisionmaking. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (03):273-281.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Candace Cummins Gauthier (2000). Moral Responsibility and Respect for Autonomy: Meeting the Communitarian Challenge. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (4):337-352.
    : The principle of respect for autonomy has come under increasing attack both within health care ethics, specifically, and as part of the more general communitarian challenge to predominantly liberal values. This paper will demonstrate the importance of respect for autonomy for the social practice of assigning moral responsibility and for the development of moral responsibility as a virtue. Guided by this virtue, the responsible exercise of autonomy may provide a much-needed connection between the individual and the community.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Philip T. Grier (1976). War and Moral Responsibility: A Philosophy & Public Affairs Reader. Teaching Philosophy 1 (3):338-340.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Armin Grunwald (2001). The Application of Ethics to Engineering and the Engineer's Moral Responsibility: Perspectives for a Research Agenda. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):415-428.
    There are different possibilities for defining the areas for the application of ethics to engineering. They range from descriptive analysis of engineers’ relationship to moral criteria and extend to normative issues on how engineers should design more “sustainable” technology. In this paper, a frame of reference is proposed, which makes it possible to elaborate in a transparent manner goals for analysis of the scope of ethics in engineering. Its point of departure is marked by two questions: 1) which types of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. John Hadley, Moral Responsibility for Harming Animals. Think.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Ken Hanly (1991). The Moral Responsibility of Corporations. Dialogue 30 (04):555-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 135