Bookmark and Share

Resurrection

Edited by K. Mitch Hodge (Amarillo College, Masaryk University)
Related categories
Siblings:
138 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 138
  1. F. Matthias Alexander (1974/1986). The Resurrection of the Body: The Essential Writings of F. Matthias Alexander. Distributed in the U.S. By Random House.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Peter Alward (2009). Cluster Theory: Resurrection. Dialogue 48 (02):269-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Bernard J. Baars (1996). Understanding Subjectivity: Global Workspace Theory and the Resurrection of the Observing Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (3):211-17.
    The world of our experience consists at all times of two parts, an objective and a subjective part . . . The objective part is the sum total of whatsoever at any given time we may be thinking of, the subjective part is the inner 'state' in which the thinking comes to pass.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John Robert Baker (1983). Counterparts and Resurrection. Southern Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):137-143.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Lynne Baker (2011). Christian Materialism in a Scientific Age. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (1):47-59.
    Many Christians who argue against Christian materialism direct their arguments against what I call ‘Type-I materialism’, the thesis that I cannot exist without my organic body. I distinguish Type-I materialism from Type-II materialism, which entails only that I cannot exist without some body that supports certain mental functions. I set out a version of Type-II materialism, and argue for its superiority to Type-I materialism in an age of science. Moreover, I show that Type-II materialism can accommodate Christian doctrines like the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Lynne Rudder Baker (2007). Persons and the Metaphysics of Resurrection. Religious Studies 43 (3):333-348.
    Theories of the human person differ greatly in their ability to underwrite a metaphysics of resurrection. This paper compares and contrasts a number of such views in light of the Christian doctrine of resurrection. In a Christian framework, resurrection requires that the same person who exists on earth also exists in an afterlife, that a postmortem person be embodied, and that the existence of a postmortem person is brought about by a miracle. According to my view of persons (the Constitution (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Lynne Rudder Baker (2001). Material Persons and the Doctrine of Resurrection. Faith and Philosophy 18 (2):151-167.
    Many Christians assume that there are only two possibilities for what a human person is: either Animalism (the view that we are fundamentally animals) or Immaterialism (the view that we are fundamentally immaterial souls). I set out a third possibility: the Constitution View (the view that we are material beings, constituted by bodies but not identical to the bodies that now constitute us.) After setting out and briefly defending the Constitution View, I apply it to the doctrine of resurrection. I (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Stephen Bann (2010). Two Kinds of Historicism: Resurrection and Restoration in French Historical Painting. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):154-171.
    The historicist approach is rarely challenged by art historians, who draw a clear distinction between art history and the present-centred pursuit of art criticism. The notion of the 'period eye' offers a relevant methodology. Bearing this in mind, I examine the nineteenth-century phase in the development of history painting, when artists started to take trouble over the accuracy of historical detail, instead of repeating conventions for portraying classical and biblical subjects. This created an unprecedented situation at the Paris Salon, where (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Craig A. Baron (2009). Incarnation and Resurrection: Toward a Contemporary Understanding. By Paul Molnar. Heythrop Journal 50 (4):701-702.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Anthony Baxter (1999). Historical Judgement, Transcendent Perspective and 'Resurrection Appearances'. Heythrop Journal 40 (1):19–40.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Frans Jozef Beeck (1988). Reviewing the Resurrection. Heythrop Journal 29 (2):232-235.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Nikolai Berdiaev (2008). The Religion of Resurrection: N. F. Fedorov's "Philosophy of the Common Task". Russian Studies in Philosophy 47 (2):65-103.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Harold Bloom (1997). Book Review: Omens of the Millennium: The Gnosis of Angels, Dreams, and Resurrection. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 21 (2).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Paul Brazier (2008). The Resurrection in Karl Barth (Barth Studies Series). By Robert Dale dawsonKarl Barth and Evangelical Theology: Convergences and Divergences. By Sung Chung (Editor). Heythrop Journal 49 (1):141–144.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Paul Brazier (2007). The Devil's Account: Philip Pullman and Christianity. By Hugh Rayment-Pickardan Introduction to Radical Theology – the Death & Resurrection of God. By Trevor Greenfieldconfessing Christ in the Twenty-First Century. By Mark Douglas. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (5):851–854.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Andrei A. Buckareff & Joel S. Van Wagenen (2010). Surviving Resurrection. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (3):123-139.
    In this paper we examine and critique the constitution view of the metaphysics of resurrection developed and defended by Lynne Rudder Baker. Baker identifies three conditions for an adequate metaphysics of resurrection. We argue that one of these, the identity condition, cannot be met on the constitution view given the account of personal identity it assumes. We discuss some problems with the constitution theory of personal identity Baker develops in her book, Persons and Bodies . We argue that these problems (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. J. Budziszewski (1986). The Resurrection of Nature: Political Theory and the Human Character. Cornell University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. A. R. Burn (1953). Egon Caesar, Conte Corti: The Destruction and Resurrection of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Translated by K. And R. Gregor Smith. Pp. X+220; 38 Plates, Map and 2 Plans. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1951. Cloth, 25s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 3 (01):64-65.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Gianfranco Cantelli (1994). The Arbor Scientiae Reconceived and the History of Vico's Resurrection. New Vico Studies 12:110-114.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Paul Carus (1905). Conception of the Soul and the Belief in Resurrection Among the Egyptians (Illustrated). The Monist 15 (3):409-428.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Paul Carus (1905). The Christian Doctrine of Resurrection. The Monist 15 (1):115-119.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. L. B. Cebik (1971). Concepts, Laws, and the Resurrection of Ideal Types'. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 1 (1):65-81.
  23. H. Chadwick (1963). Ernest Evans: Tertullian's Treatise on the Resurrection. Pp. Xxxvi + 361 London: S.P.C.K., 1960. Cloth, 50s. Net. The Classical Review 13 (02):240-241.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Hugh Chandler (2010). Wittgenstein on the Resurrection. Philosophical Investigations 33 (4):321-338.
    Wittgenstein probably did not believe in Christ's Resurrection (as an historical event), but he may well have believed that if he had achieved a higher level of devoutness he would believe it. His view seems to have been that devout Christians are right in holding onto this belief tenaciously even though, in fact, it's false. It's historical falsity, is compatible with its religious validity, so to speak. So far as I can see, he did not think that devout Christians should (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Joseph Clements (1910). Björklund's “Death and Resurrection”. The Monist 20 (4):630-632.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Kevin Corcoran (ed.) (2001). Soul, Body, and Survival: Essays on the Metaphysics of Human Persons. Cornell University Press.
    This collection brings together cutting-edge research on the metaphysics of human nature and soul-body dualism.Kevin Corcoran's collection, Soul, Body, and ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. A. Corticelli (1968). The immortality of the soul and the resurrection of the body according to Giles of Rome. Augustinianum 8 (2):399-400.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Gustavo Costa (1994). The Arbor Scientiae Reconceived and the History of Vico's Resurrection. New Vico Studies 12:121-123.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. William J. Danaher Jr (2010). Music That Will Bring Back the Dead? Resurrection, Reconciliation, and Restorative Justice in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (1):115-141.
    This essay explores how the doctrine of the Resurrection informs theological reflection on reconciliation in post-Apartheid South Africa. It begins by establishing the fragile and liminal state of reconciliation, despite the efforts of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. It then argues that the Resurrection offers an ecstatic and relational understanding of the human, which in turn provides a basis for advancing claims regarding human dignity and well-being. In conversation with the work of Oliver O'Donovan and James Alison on the Resurrection, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Stephen T. Davis (2010). Resurrection. In Charles Taliaferro & Chad V. Meister (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Christian Philosophical Theology. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Stephen T. Davis (2001). Physicalism and Resurrection. In Kevin J. Corcoran (ed.), Soul, Body, and Survival. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Stephen T. Davis (2000). The Rationality of Resurrection for Christians. Philo 3 (1):41-51.
    The present paper is a rejoinder to Michael Martin’s “Reply to Davis” (Philo vol. 2, no. 1), which was a response to my “Is Belief in theResurrection Rational? A Response to Michael Martin” (ibid.), which was itself a response to Martin’s “Why the Resurrection is Initially Improbable” (Philo vol. 1, no. 1), which in turn was a critique of various of my own writings on resurrection, especially Risen Indeed: Making Sense of the Resurrection.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Stephen T. Davis (1999). Is Belief in the Resurrection Rational? Philo 2 (1):51-61.
    This essay is a response to Michael Martin’s “Why the Resurrection Is Initially Improbable,” Philo, Vol. 1, No.1. I argue that Martin has not succeeded in achieving his aim of showing that the Resurrection is initially improbable and thus, by Bayes’s Theorem, implausible. I respond to five of Martin’s arguments: (1) the “particular time and place argument”; (2) the claim that there is no plausible Christian theory of why Jesus should have been incarnated and resurrected; (3) the claim that the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Stephen T. Davis (1990). Doubting the Resurrection. Faith and Philosophy 7 (1):99-111.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Stephen T. Davis (ed.) (1989). Death and Afterlife. St. Martin's Press.
  36. Stephen T. Davis (1988). Traditional Christian Belief in the Resurrection of the Body. New Scholasticism 62 (1):72-97.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Stephen T. Davis (1985). Naturalism and the Resurrection. Faith and Philosophy 2 (3):303-308.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Stephen T. Davis, Daniel Kendall & Gerald O'Collins (eds.) (1997). The Resurrection. Oxford Up.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jason T. Eberl (2009). Do Human Persons Persist Between Death and Resurrection? In Kevin Timpe & Eleonore Stump (eds.), Metaphysics and God: Essays in Honor of Eleonore Stump. Routledge.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Albert J. Edmunds (1917). The Text of the Resurrection in Mark, and its Testimony to the Apparitional Theory. The Monist 27 (2):161-178.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Denis Edwards (2006). Resurrection of the Body and Transformation of the Universe in the Theology of Karl Rahner. Philosophy and Theology 18 (2):357-383.
    At the end of his life, Rahner pointed to the need for a fully systematic theology that brings out the inner relationship between Jesus Christ and the universe put before us by the natural sciences. In this article, it is argued that Rahner had long been pursuing this theological agenda. His various contributions on this topic arebrought together and discussed within a framework of six systematic elements that are found in his work: self-bestowal as the meaning and purpose of creation; (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. C. S. J. Elizabeth A. Johnson (1983). Resurrection and Reality in the Thought of Wolfhart Pannenberg. Heythrop Journal 24 (1):1–18.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. S. F. (1999). Stephen T. Davis, Daniel Kendall S.J., And Gerald O'collins S.J. The Resurrection. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997). Pp. XVIII+368. £30.00 Hbk. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 35 (2):241-243.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Michel Ferrari & Adrien Pinard (2006). Death and Resurrection of a Disciplined Science of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (12):75-96.
    The Latin conscius does not translate anything like mind or consciousness. Only in the mid-nineteenth century do we find the first attempts to study consciousness as its own discipline. Wundt, James, and Freud disagreed about how to approach the science of consciousness, although agreeing that psychology was a 'science of consciousness' that takes lived biological experience as its object. The behaviorists vetoed this idea. By the 1950s, for cognitive science, mind (conscious and unconscious) was considered analogous to computer software. Recently, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Antony Flew (1999). Explaining the Resurrection. Philo 2 (2):69-70.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Bruce V. Foltz (2006). The Resurrection of Nature: Environmental Metaphysics in Sergei Bulgakov's Philosophy of Economy. Philosophy and Theology 18 (1):121-142.
    Although equal in power to other facets of the rich cultural ferment of modern Russia that have profoundly influenced Western civilization—such as painting, literature, drama, and politics—the authentic legacy of twentieth-century Russian philosophy has until recently been eclipsed by Soviet ideological dominance. Of the important philosophers drawing upon the characteristically Russian synthesis of Ancient Neoplatonism, German Idealism, and Byzantine spirituality, Sergei Bulgakov is outstanding, and his work has important implications for our contemporary thinking about the relationship between humanity and nature (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Joanna K. Forstrom (2010). John Locke and Personal Identity: Immortality and Bodily Resurrection in 17th-Century Philosophy. Continuum.
    Introduction -- John Locke and the problem of personal identity : the principium individuationis, personal immortality, and bodily resurrection -- On separation and immortality : Descartes and the nature of the soul -- On materialism and immortality or Hobbes' rejection of the natural argument for the immortality of the soul -- Henry More and John Locke on the dangers of materialism : immateriality, immortality, immorality, and identity -- Robert Boyle : on seeds, cannibalism, and the resurrection of the body -- (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. J. E. Fries (1910). Death and Resurrection. The Monist 20 (2):279-297.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. S. J. G. G. O'collins (1967). Is the Resurrection an 'Historical' Event? Heythrop Journal 8 (4):381–387.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. William A. Galston (1987). Book Review:The Resurrection of Nature: Political Theory and the Human Character. J. Budziszewski. [REVIEW] Ethics 98 (1):173-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 138