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  1. William J. Abraham (2009). The Epistemology of Jesus : An Initial Investigation. In Paul K. Moser (ed.), Jesus and Philosophy: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.
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  2. William J. Abraham (1991). Revelation in Religious Belief. Faith and Philosophy 8 (2):254-256.
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  3. Jason Aleksander (2010). The Aporetic Ground of Revelation’s Authority in the Divine Comedy and Dante’s Demarcation and Defense of Philosophical Authority. Essays in Medieval Studies 26:1-14.
    I discuss Dante’s understanding that human existence is “ordered by two final goals” and how, for Dante, this understanding defines philosophy’s and revelation’s respective scopes of authority in guiding human conduct. Specifically, I show that, although Dante subordinates our earthly beatitude to spiritual beatitude in a way that seems to suggest the subordination of the authority of philosophy to that of revelation, he in fact limits philosophy’s scope to an arena in which its authority is not only legitimate but also (...)
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  4. Guy Axtell (forthcoming). Possibility and Permission? Intellectual Character, Inquiry, and the Ethics of Belief. In Pihlstrom S. & Rydenfelt H. (eds.), William James on Religion. (Palgrave McMillan “Philosophers in Depth” Series.
    This chapter examines the modifications William James made to his account of the ethics of belief from his early ‘subjective method’ to his later heightened concerns with personal doxastic responsibility and with an empirically-driven comparative research program he termed a ‘science of religions’. There are clearly tensions in James’ writings on the ethics of belief both across his career and even within Varieties itself, tensions which some critics think spoil his defense of what he calls religious ‘faith ventures’ or ‘overbeliefs’. (...)
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  5. Guy Axtell (2006). Blind Man's Bluff: The Basic Belief Apologetic as Anti-Skeptical Stratagem. Philosophical Studies 130 (1):131--152.
    Today we find philosophical naturalists and Christian theists both expressing an interest in virtue epistemology, while starting out from vastly different assumptions. What can be done to increase fruitful dialogue among these divergent groups of virtue-theoretic thinkers? The primary aim of this paper is to uncover more substantial common ground for dialogue by wielding a double-edged critique of certain assumptions shared by `scientific' and `theistic' externalisms, assumptions that undermine proper attention to epistemic agency and responsibility. I employ a responsibilist virtue (...)
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  6. Shane Berg (2010). Religious Epistemology and the History of the Dead Sea Scrolls Community. In John J. Collins & Daniel C. Harlow (eds.), The "Other" in Second Temple Judaism: Essays in Honor of John J. Collins. W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..
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  7. Shlomo Biderman (1995). Scripture and Knowledge: An Essay on Religious Epistemology. E.J. Brill.
    At the core of "Scripture and Knowledge lies the problem of the nature of religious knowledge.
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  8. John Bishop (2007). Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief. Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press ;.
    Does our available evidence show that some particular religion is correct?
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  9. Christopher Bobier (2014). Anti-Luck Virtue Epistemology and Divine Revelation. Philosophia 42 (2):309-320.
    Anti-Luck Virtue Epistemology (ALVE) states that for S to have knowledge, S must have a virtuously formed safe true belief. S’s belief that p is safe if, in most near-by possible worlds where S’s belief is formed in the same manner as in the actual world, S’s belief is true. S’s safe belief that p is virtuously formed if S’s safe belief is formed using reliable and well-integrated cognitive processes and it is to S’s credit that she formed the belief. (...)
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  10. David Brown (1997). N. Wolterstorff, Divine Discourse: Philosophical Reflections on the Claim That God Speaks. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.) Pp. X+326. £12.95 Pb. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 33 (4):473-484.
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  11. Andrei Buckareff (2009). Metaepistemology and Divine Revelation. Heythrop Journal 50 (1):85-90.
    In Crossing the Threshold of Divine Revelation,1 William Abraham offers a rich, subtle defense of an epistemology of divine revelation. While I believe there is much about Abraham’s work that is commendable, my remarks in this paper will be primarily critical. But the fact that Abraham’s work is worthy of critical comment should be evidence enough of the importance of Abraham’s book. My focus here will be on a cluster of metaepistemological claims made by Abraham. Specifically, I will argue that (...)
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  12. Edward P. Butler (2005). The Theological Interpretation of Myth. Pomegranate 7 (1):27-41.
    This article seeks in the Platonic philosophers of late antiquity insights applicable to a new discipline, the philosophy of Pagan religion. An impor¬tant element of any such discipline would be a method of mythological hermeneutics that could be applied cross-culturally. The article draws par¬ticular elements of this method from Sallust and Olympiodorus. Sallust’s five modes of the interpretation of myth (theological, physical, psychical, material and mixed) are discussed, with one of them, the theological, singled out for its applicability to all (...)
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  13. Masudul Alam Choudhury (2006). Science and Epistemology in the Koran. Edwin Mellen Press.
    v. 1. Methodological issues and themes in the Koran -- v. 2. The nature of monotheism in Koranic thought -- v. 3. Circular causation model in the Koran -- v. 4. Monotheism applied to social issues in the Koran -- v. 5. The Koranic principle of complementarities applied to social and scientific themes.
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  14. John Cooper (2000). The Limits of the Sacred: The Epistemology of ʻabd Al-Karim Soroush. In Ronald L. Nettler, Mohamed Mahmoud & John Cooper (eds.), Islam and Modernity: Muslim Intellectuals Respond. I. B. Tauris.
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  15. Johan De Smedt & Helen De Cruz (2013). Delighting in Natural Beauty: Joint Attention and the Phenomenology of Nature Aesthetics. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (4):167-186.
    Empirical research in the psychology of nature appreciation suggests that humans across cultures tend to evaluate nature in positive aesthetic terms, including a sense of beauty and awe. They also frequently engage in joint attention with other persons, whereby they are jointly aware of sharing attention to the same event or object. This paper examines how, from a natural theological perspective, delight in natural beauty can be conceptualized as a way of joining attention to creation. Drawing on an analogy between (...)
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  16. Peter Forrest, The Epistemology of Religion. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Contemporary epistemology of religion may conveniently be treated as adebate over whether evidentialism applies to thebelief-component of religious faith, or whether we should insteadadopt a more permissive epistemology. Here evidentialism is theinitially plausible position that a belief is justified only if``it is proportioned to the evidence''. For example, supposea local weather forecaster has noticed that over the two hundred yearssince records began a wetter than average Winter is followed in 85% ofcases by a hotter than average Summer. Then, assuming for (...)
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  17. Peter Forrest (1999). Towards an Epistemology of Religious Traditions. Sophia 38 (1):25-40.
    Starting from the acceptance of the Egalitarian Principle I exhibited a version which I considered too lax (BEP) and one I considered too strict (NEP), arriving at a version (MEP) which allows that there can be tolerance-limiting reasons for adhering to traditions but only if they are based on unreasoned knowledge claims. In fact, I hold that the situation most of us find ourselves in restricts such claims on religious topics to very general ones. Hence the choice between NEP and (...)
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  18. Philippe Gagnon (2012). Review of Yves Tourenne, Introduction à la Métaphysique de Claude Tresmontant. Pour Une Recherche d'Articulation Entre Sciences Expérimentales, Métaphysique, Pensée de l'Église Et Mystique Chrétienne Orthodoxe. [REVIEW] Science Et Esprit 64 (2):304-309.
  19. Philippe Gagnon (1999). La Contribution de Claude Tresmontant à la Compréhension des Signes de Crédibilité de la Révélation. Église Et Théologie 30 (3):327-364.
    This study is devoted to the problem of the place and significance of the scientific quest and worldview, and to their articulation with metaphysics as they serve to bring the mind to the consideration of the problem and mystery of the existence of God in the thought of the contemporary French philosopher and theologian Claude Tresmontant (1925-97).
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  20. Robert Gibbs (2005). Messianic Epistemology. In Yvonne Sherwood & Kevin Hart (eds.), Derrida and Religion: Other Testaments. Routledge.
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  21. John Greco (2001). Warranted Christian Belief. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 75 (3):461-466.
  22. John Greco (1997). Catholics Vs. Calvinists on Religious Knowledge. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 71 (1):13-34.
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  23. Paul Helm (2001). Speaking and Revealing. Religious Studies 37 (3):249-258.
    I argue on three distinct grounds that the contrast between speaking and revealing is nothing like so sharp as Wolterstorff maintains in Divine Discourse. Speaking may be revealing: in speaking a person may reveal much about himself. Putative divine speaking can only be made intelligible given a background of what I refer to as INIS revelation, and in revealing, or more exactly, in having revealed, God may still speak.
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  24. Bradley L. Herling (2007). Dan Arnold, Buddhists, Brahmins, and Belief: Epistemology in South Asian Philosophy of Religion , New York: Columbia University Press, 2005, 328 Pp., ISBN: 0-231-13280-8, Hb. [REVIEW] Sophia 46 (1):95-97.
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  25. Noriaki Iwasa (2011). Grading Religions. Sophia 50 (1):189-209.
    This essay develops standards for grading religions including various forms of spiritualism. First, I examine the standards proposed by William James, John Hick, Paul Knitter, Dan Cohn-Sherbok, and Harold Netland. Most of them are useful in grading religions with or without conditions. However, those standards are not enough for refined and piercing evaluation. Thus, I introduce standards used in spiritualism. Although those standards are for grading spirits and their teachings, they are useful in refined and piercing evaluation of religious phenomena. (...)
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  26. Leonard W. J. Kuijp (1987). An Early Tibetan View of the Soteriology of Buddhist Epistemology: The Case of 'Bri-Gung 'Jig-Rten Mgon-Po. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 15 (1):57-70.
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  27. Dermot A. Lane (2005). The Experience of God: An Invitation to Do Theology. Paulist Press.
    Experience, God, and theology -- The nature of revelation -- The activity of faith.
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  28. Patrick Lee (1989). Reasons and Religious Belief. Faith and Philosophy 6 (1):19-34.
    The problem addressed is: whether religious belief, defined here as accepting that God has revealed and that what he has revealed is true, could ever be rational. That is, does the idea of religious belief imply that it is irrational? The author attempts to resolve this problem in favor of religious belief, and suggests how reasons can legitimately function in religious belief. The evidentialist objection to religion is answered, and it is proposed that reasons might function, not to prove that (...)
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  29. Paul A. Macdonald (2005). A Realist Epistemology of Faith. Religious Studies 41 (4):373-393.
    In this paper, I analyse and interpret Thomas Aquinas's account of faith in order to show how Thomistic faith is a veridical cognitive state that directs the mind to God, and consequently constitutes a distinct form of knowledge of God. By assenting to the revealed propositions of faith (which express the truth about God), and thereby forming true beliefs about God under the authority and guidance of God's grace, the possessor of faith comes to know or apprehend truly something about (...)
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  30. J. J. MacIntosh (1992). Robert Boyle's Epistemology: The Interaction Between Scientific and Religious Knowledge. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 6 (2):91 – 121.
    Abstract Boyle distinguished clearly between the areas which we would call scientific and theological. However, he felt that they overlapped seamlessly, and that the truths we discovered (or which were revealed to us) in one of these areas would be relevant to us in the other. In this paper I outline and discuss Boyle's views on the limitations of human knowing, Boyle's arguments in favour of accepting the revelations of the Christian faith, and his views on the kind of epistomological (...)
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  31. Domenic Marbaniang (2009). Theology of Revelation in the Bible and the Writings of 19th and 20th Century Theologians. Google Books.
    This book gives an introduction to the various theological perspectives regarding revelation. It includes a survey of the views of liberal, evangelical, Calvinist, and Charismatic theologians. The author presents his succinct view in the last chapter.
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  32. Glenn Morrison (2009). The Bible and Epistemology: Biblical Soundings of the Knowledge of God. Edited by Mary Healy and Robin Parry. Heythrop Journal 50 (3):512-513.
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  33. Philip L. Quinn (2001). Can God Speak? Does God Speak? Religious Studies 37 (3):259-269.
    This paper critically examines what Nicholas Wolterstorff has to say in Divine Discourse in response to the two questions in the title. It tries to show that his argument for the conclusion that God can have the obligations of a speaker is defective. It also tries to show that his argument for the conclusion that some actual person is entitled to believe that God has spoken to her is incomplete. The paper's conclusion is that Wolterstorff's arguments fail to establish, or (...)
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  34. Richard Swinburne (2010). What Does the Old Testament Mean? In M. Bergmann, M. Murray & M. Rae (eds.), Divine Evil?, the Moral Character of the God of Abraham. Oxford Up.
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  35. Richard Swinburne (2009). Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy (Second Edition). Philosophia Christi 11 (1):249 - 252.
    The great religions often claim that their books or creeds contain truths revealed by God. How could we know that they do? In the second edition of Revelation, renowned philosopher of religion Richard Swinburne addresses this central question. But since the books of great religions often contain much poetry and parable, Swinburne begins by investigating how eternal truth can be conveyed in unfamiliar genres, by analogy and metaphor, within false presuppositions about science and history. In the final part of the (...)
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  36. Richard Swinburne (1993). Reply: A Further Defence of Christian Revelation. Religious Studies 29 (3):395 - 400.
    In response to Peter Byrne’s critical notice of my book "Revelation", I argue that if God is to put us in a position freely to choose to seek Him, we need some propositional revelation (about what he is like and how to worship him), but also some scope for sorting out the implications of that revelation. Both of these aims are satisfied if the Christian Bible with the normal tradition of how to interpret it are the vehicle of revelation.
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  37. Richard Swinburne (1992). Revelation in Our Knowledge of God, Clark, Kelly James (Ed). In . Kluwer.
    If there is a God who wants us to become saints worthy of the beatific vision, he will provide us with information how to do so -- that is, with a propositional revelation. The revelation will not be too evident -- in order that we may choose whether or not to search it out and tell others about it -- and its interpretation for new centuries and cultures will require a church. The tests of a genuine revelation are its consonance (...)
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  38. Richard Swinburne (1992). Revelation in Our Knowledge of God. In Kelly James Clark (ed.). Kluwer.
    If there is a God who wants us to become saints worthy of the beatific vision, he will provide us with information how to do so -- that is, with a propositional revelation. The revelation will not be too evident -- in order that we may choose whether or not to search it out and tell others about it -- and its interpretation for new centuries and cultures will require a church. The tests of a genuine revelation are its consonance (...)
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  39. J. C. Thomas (1977). The Epistemology of Karl Barth. Heythrop Journal 18 (4):383–398.
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  40. Erik J. Wielenberg (2010). Sceptical Theism and Divine Lies. Religious Studies 46 (4):509-523.
    In this paper I develop a novel challenge for sceptical theists. I present a line of reasoning that appeals to sceptical theism to support scepticism about divine assertions. I claim that this reasoning is at least as plausible as one popular sceptical theistic strategy for responding to evidential arguments from evil. Thus, I seek to impale sceptical theists on the horns of a dilemma: concede that either (a) sceptical theism implies scepticism about divine assertions, or (b) the sceptical theistic strategy (...)
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