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  1. Hanoch Ben-Yami (2013). Circumcision: What Should Be Done? Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (7):459-462.
    I explain why I think that considerations regarding the opposing rights involved in the practice of circumcision—rights of the individual to bodily integrity and rights of the community to practice its religion—would not help us decide on the desirable policy towards this controversial practice. I then suggest a few measures that are not in conflict with either religious or community rights but that can both reduce the harm that circumcision as currently practiced involves and bring about a change in attitude (...)
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  2. Jacob Blair (2012). Defending A Rodinian Account of Self-Defense. Review Journal of Political Philosophy 9:7-47.
    There’s a widespread intuition that if the only way an innocent person can stop her villainous attacker from killing her is to kill him instead, then she is morally permitted to do so. But why is it that she is permitted to employ lethal force on an aggressor if that is what is required to save her life? My primary goal in this paper is to defend David Rodin's fairly recent and under-recognized account of self-defense that answers this question. There (...)
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  3. Lisa Bortolotti (2011). The Concept of Scientific Research. In Carlos Maria Romeo Casabona (ed.), Los Nuevos Horizontes de la Investigacion Genetica. Comares
  4. Harry Brighouse (2002). What Rights (If Any) Do Children Have. In David Archard & Colin M. Macleod (eds.), The Moral and Political Status of Children. OUP Oxford 31--52.
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  5. Bo Brinkman (2013). An Analysis of Student Privacy Rights in the Use of Plagiarism Detection Systems. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1255-1266.
    Plagiarism detection services are a powerful tool to help encourage academic integrity. Adoption of these services has proven to be controversial due to ethical concerns about students’ rights. Central to these concerns is the fact that most such systems make permanent archives of student work to be re-used in plagiarism detection. This computerization and automation of plagiarism detection is changing the relationships of trust and responsibility between students, educators, educational institutions, and private corporations. Educators must respect student privacy rights when (...)
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  6. Michael Clark (1995). Invasions of Privacy (Guest Editor's Preface). Law Computers and AI 4 (3):1-3.
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  7. Austin Dacey & Dj Grothe (2004). Humanist Activism - Atheism Is Not a Civil Rights Issue. Free Inquiry 24.
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  8. Derrick Darby, Book Review: The American Language of Rights. [REVIEW]
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  9. Jan Deckers (2011). Negative “GHIs,” the Right to Health Protection, and Future Generations. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):165-176.
    The argument has been made that future generations of human beings are being harmed unjustifiably by the actions individuals commit today. This paper addresses what it might mean to harm future generations, whether we might harm them, and what our duties toward future generations might be. After introducing the Global Health Impact (GHI) concept as a unit of measurement that evaluates the effects of human actions on the health of all organisms, an incomplete theory of human justice is proposed. Having (...)
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  10. Donna L. Dickenson (1998). Children's Rights. Hastings Center Report 29 (1):5-5.
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  11. Robert E. Emerick (1996). Mad Liberation: The Sociology of Knowledge and the Ultimate Civil Rights Movement. Journal of Mind and Behavior 17 (2):135-160.
    Mad liberation — the former mental patient self-help movement — is characterized in this paper as a true progressive social movement. A sociology of knowledge perspective is used to account for much of the research literature that argues, to the contrary, that self-help groups do not represent a true social movement. Based on the "myth of individualism" and the "myth of simplicity," the psychological literature on self-help has defined empowerment in self-help groups as an individual-change or therapeutic orientation. This paper, (...)
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  12. J. O. Famakinwa (2011). Interpreting the Right to Life. Diametros 29 (29):22-30.
    What does the right to life mean? The article considers three interpretations: (i) the right to life as the right to life-sustaining essentials, (ii) the right to life as the right not to be killed,s and (iii) the right to life as the right not to be killed unjustly. The article argues that (i) and (iii) accurately define the human right to life. The primary method is philosophical analysis. The article concludes that the right to life is best defined or (...)
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  13. Danny Frederick (2011). Confusion About the Right to Life. The Reasoner 5 (1):4-5.
    I defend the consistency of affirming the right to life while rejecting universal healthcare and liveable income programmes. I also defend the rationality of accepting inconsistency.
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  14. Joseph S. Fulda (2012). Authors' Moral Rights—And How Editors and Publishers Routinely Abridge Them. Journal of Information Ethics 21 (2):7-9.
    Discusses a variety of maneuvers that editors and publishers, respectively, use with the untoward result that the author conveys something other than what and only what he intended to convey.
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  15. Joseph S. Fulda (2012). Google Books and Other Internet Mischief. Journal of Information Ethics 21 (2):104-109.
    This article argues for substantial ex–post criminal penalties against purveyors of stolen intellectual property, in lieu of current legislation winding its way through both chambers of the United States Congress. Inter alia, it discusses why such a drastic remedy has proven necessary and what other measures the Congress should consider adopting. It concludes with a sobering discussion of Internet mischief more generally. -/- Note: This is in marked contrast to views expressed in 1999 when civil justice would have sufficed, and (...)
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  16. Joseph S. Fulda (2012). Written for the Moment. Journal of Information Ethics 21 (1):21-26.
    This article argues that the disclosure, dissemination, sale, and publication of texts—such as text messages, e-mails, and letters—addressed to anyone other than the public at large are gravely and profoundly immoral. The argument has two strands, the first based on a conception of privacy largely due to Steven Davis (2009), and the second based on the concept of authorial autonomy and its reverse, authorial dilution.
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  17. Joseph S. Fulda (2009). Information Ethics: Privacy, Property, and Power, Adam D. Moore (Ed.). [REVIEW] Journal of Information Ethics 18 (1):94-103.
    Largely favorable review, with only one significant criticism. Note that the URL points to /all/ reviews in the issue.
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  18. Joseph S. Fulda (2000). Owning the Future by Seth Shulman. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 2 (3):193-194.
    Very favorable review of a wide-ranging book.
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  19. Jennifer Greene (1998). Michael Leahy and Dan Cohn-Sherbok, Eds., The Liberation Debate: Rights at Issue Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (1):42-47.
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  20. Toby Handfield (2003). Nozick, Prohibition, and No-Fault Motor Insurance. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):201–208.
    Is a Nozickian theory of rights compatible with a no-fault motor insurance scheme? I say, Yes. The argument turns on an explication of the basis on which a Nozickian justifies the prohibition of merely risky activities.
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  21. Rebecca Hanrahan (2007). Dog Duty. Society and Animals 15 (4):379-399.
    Burgess-Jackson argues that the duties we have to our companion animals are similar to the duties we have to our children. Specifically, he argues that a person who takes custody of either a nonhuman animal or a child elevates the moral status of the child or animal, endowing each with rights neither had before. These rights obligate that person to provide for the well being of the creature—animal or child—in question. This paper offers two arguments against this position. First, a (...)
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  22. Peng Kang (2001). The New Culture Movement and the Human Rights Movement (1931). In Stephen C. Angle & Marina Svensson (eds.), Chinese Human Rights Reader. M. E. Sharpe 152.
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  23. Ken Knisely, Anita Silvers, Patrick Sullivan & John Loughney (forthcoming). Disabled Rights: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed. DVD.
    Can the rights of the disabled be justified by John Locke's theory of natural rights? Does an "ethics of caring" offer a better framework for considering these rights? When can we end a human life? With Anita Silvers, Patrick Sullivan, and John Loughney.
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  24. Ken Knisely, Patrick Sullivan & John Loughney (2001). Disabled Rights: Dvd. Milk Bottle Productions.
    Can the rights of the disabled be justified by John Locke's theory of natural rights? Does an "ethics of caring" offer a better framework for considering these rights? When can we end a human life? With Anita Silvers, Patrick Sullivan, and John Loughney.
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  25. John P. Lizza (2010). Potentiality and Persons at the Margins of Life. Diametros 26:44-57.
    The concept of potentiality is often invoked in debate over the moral status of human embryos. It has also been invoked, though less prominently, in debate over the moral status of anencephalic infants, individuals in permanent vegetative state, and the whole-brain dead. In this paper, I examine some of the theoretical assumptions underlying the concept of potentiality invoked in these debates. I show how parties in the debate over the ethical significance of potentiality have been talking past each other to (...)
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  26. Arthur Stephen McGrade (1982). Rights, Natural Rights, and the Philosophy of Law. In Norman Kretzmann, Anthony Kenny & Jan Pinborg (eds.), Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge
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  27. Hugh V. McLachlan (2010). Moral Rights to Life, Both Natural and Non-Natural: Reflections on James Griffin's Account of Human Rights. Diametros 26:58-76.
    Rather than to focus upon a particular ‘right to life’, we should consider what rights there are pertaining to our lives and to our living. There are different sorts. There are, for instance, rights that constitute absences of particular duties and rights that correspond to the duties of other agents or agencies. There are also natural and non-natural rights and duties. Different people in different contexts can have different moral duties and different moral rights including rights to life. The question (...)
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  28. Diana Tietjens Meyers (1978). The Foundations of Natural Rights. Dissertation, City University of New York
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  29. Herbert C. Noonan (1936). The State and Natural Rights. Modern Schoolman 13 (2):30-34.
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  30. Evangelos Protopapadakis (2012). A Cool Hand on My Feverish Forehead: An Even Better Samaritan and the Ethics of Abortion. Philosophy Study 2 (2):115-123.
    The debate concerning abortion abounds in miraculous narratives. Judith Jarvis Thomson has contrived the most celebrated set among related ones, to wit the “violinist analogy,” the “Good Samaritan” narrative, and the “Henry Fonda” allegory, by virtue of which, she intends, on the one hand, to argue that women’s right to autonomy outweighs the alleged fetus’s right to life, and on the other, to prove that no positive moral duties can be derived towards other persons alone from the fact that a (...)
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  31. Laura Purdy (1992). In Their Best Interest? The Case Against Equal Rights for Children. Cornell University Press.
    Proponents of children's liberation (CL) argue that there are no morally relevant differences between children and adults. Consequently, special protective laws that limit children's freedom are unjustified, and should be abolished. Protectionists reject the premise of this argument, and hence also the conclusion. Proponents of CL mostly fix upon the capacity for instrumental reasoning as the criterion that should separate autonomous from non-autonomous individuals. I argue that most children are substantially worse at instrumental reasoning than most adults, and although drawing (...)
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  32. Carlos Romeo-Casabona (2004). Intellectual Property Rights And The Controversy Between Developed And Developing Countries: Is It Ethical To Take Care For Animals' Suffering But To Forget The Needs Of Humans For Survival? Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 14 (6):203-208.
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  33. John Rowan (1998). Michael P. Zuckert, The Natural Rights Republic. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 18:387-388.
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  34. T. M. Scanlon (2008). Rights and Interests. In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. OUP Oxford
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  35. Re'em Segev (2001). Freedom of Expression Against Governmental Authorities. Israel Democracy Institute.
    The subject of this study is the justification for limiting negative expression directed at the government: its institutions and public officials, in order to preserve public faith in government. This paper is an abstract of a book that considers this question. The conclusion is that since the value of speech concerned with the performance of government is very high and the interest in protecting the status of government is limited and typically not substantial, there is generally no justification for legal (...)
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  36. Marco Solinas (2009). Review of Hauke Brunkhorst, Habermas. [REVIEW] Iride (56):253-254.
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  37. Lance K. Stell (1979). Dueling and the Right to Life. Ethics 90 (1):7-26.
  38. Mari Stenlund (2011). Involuntary Antipsychotic Medication and Freedom of Thought. Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 4 (2):31-33.
    In this article I clarify the relationship between the use of involuntary antipsychotic medication and a delusional person’s freedom of thought in the light of three different views of freedom, namely, freedom as negative freedom, freedom as having an autonomous mind and freedom as capability. It is not clear how freedom of thought as a psychotic person’s human right should be understood and protected in practice. Therefore, further discussion is needed. These different ways of understanding a patient’s freedom of thought (...)
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  39. Angus Taylor, An Interview with Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka.
    Angus Taylor interviews Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka, authors of Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights.
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  40. Cristian Timmermann (2013). Life Sciences, Intellectual Property Regimes and Global Justice. Dissertation, Wageningen University
    In this thesis we have examined the complex interaction between intellectual property rights, life sciences and global justice. Science and the innovations developed in its wake have an enormous effect on our daily lives, providing countless opportunities but also raising numerous problems of justice. The complexity of a problem however does not liberate society as a whole from moral responsibilities. Our intellectual property regimes clash at various points with human rights law and commonly held notions of justice.
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  41. Gabriela I. Tymowski (forthcoming). Children and the Appropriateness of Rights-Based Theories. Philosophy.
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  42. Makoto Usami (2013). Global Justice: From Responsibility to Rights. Discussion Paper, No. 2013–02, Department of Social Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology:1-12.
    In the past decade, a growing number of authors, notably Thomas Pogge, have maintained that citizens in economically advanced societies are responsible for extreme and extensive poverty in the developing world. Iris Marion Young proposed the social connection model of responsibility, which asserts that these citizens participate in networks that give rise to global structural injustices. While Pogge’s argument for the existence of citizens’ responsibility has been the subject of widespread debate, few efforts have been made to scrutinise the solidity (...)
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  43. Makoto Usami (2011). Intergenerational Justice: The Rights of Future People or the Duty of Fair Play. Tokyo Institute of Technology Department of Social Engineering Discussion Paper (2011-05):1-19.
    Among various views on intergenerational justice, the most widely accepted theory invokes the rights of future generations. However, the rights theory seems to suffer from the non-identity problem addressed by Derek Parfit. Some rights theorists attempt to circumvent the problem by examining causal links between actions taken by preceding generations and their effects on succeeding ones. Others try to do so by replacing future individual rights with such collective rights. This paper argues that both individualist and collectivist versions of the (...)
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  44. Makoto Usami (2011). Intergenerational Rights: A Philosophical Examination. In Patricia Hanna (ed.), An Anthology of Philosophical Studies, Vol. 5. Athens Institute of Education and Research
    One of the primary views on our supposed obligation towards our descendants in the context of environmental problems invokes the idea of the rights of future generations. A growing number of authors also hold that the descendants of those victimized by historical injustices, including colonialism and slavery, have the right to demand financial reparations for the sufferings of their distant ancestors. However, these claims of intergenerational rights face theoretical difficulties, notably the non-identity problem. To circumvent this problem in a relationship (...)
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  45. Donald VanDeVeer (1981). RG Frey, Interests and Rights Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 1 (1):16-19.
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  46. Donald Vandeveer (1981). R.G. Frey, Interests And Rights. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 1:16-19.
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  47. Richard Weikart (2013). On Natural Rights and Bioethics. In Stephen Dilley (ed.), Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension. Lexington Books 197.
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  48. Peter Gn West-Oram & Heather Widdows, Global Population and Global Justice: Equitable Distribution of Resources Among Countries. The Electronic Library of Science.
    Analysing the demands of global justice for the distribution of resources is a complex task and requires consideration of a broad range of issues. Of particular relevance is the effect that different distributions will have on global population growth and individual welfare. Since changes in the consumption and distribution of resources can have major effects on the welfare of the global population, and the rate at which it increases, it is important to establish meaningful principles to ensure a just distribution (...)
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Rights in Applied Ethics, Misc
  1. Katja Becker, Eva-Maria Engelen & Milos Vec (eds.) (2003). Ethisierung - Ethikferne: Wie Viel Ethik Braucht Die Wissenschaft? De Gruyter.
    Wieviel Ethik braucht der Mensch, wieviel Ethik braucht die Wissenschaft? Vor dem aktuellen Hintergrund einer gewandelten Wissenschaftsgesellschaft von hoher Entwicklungsdynamik geht es darum, Anleitung zu ethischer Selbst- und Situationsreflexion zu geben. Denn die spektakulären Errungenschaften nicht nur im Bereich der Biomedizin haben jedenfalls vorübergehend Zonen von moralischer und ethischer Ratlosigkeit geschaffen. Sie eröffnen Spielräume, von denen nicht sicher ist, ob sie genutzt werden dürfen und sollten. Die Empfindlichkeit gegenüber den Nachteilen und Risiken der technisch-wissenschaftlichen Zivilisation ist jedenfalls dort, wo die (...)
  2. Elizabeth Foreman (2015). Doing Without Moral Rights. In Elisa Aaltola & John Hadley (eds.), Animal Rights and Philosophy: Questioning the Orthodoxy. Rowman & Littlefield International 133-147.
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