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  1. Robert J. Aalberts & Marianne M. Jennings (1999). The Ethics of Slotting: Is This Bribery, Facilitation Marketing or Just Plain Competition? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 20 (3):207 - 215.
    The practice of manufacturers' payments of fees to retailers for the display and sale of their products has become a common practice. In the grocery retail business, the fees paid by manufacturers are called slotting fees, or a payment made for a slot on the shelf. The same practice is used now in the retail book industry. Large book chains command high fees from publishers for the prominent display of books. Entrepreneur's products are often precluded from stores and markets because (...)
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  2. Johannes Brinkmann (2002). Business and Marketing Ethics as Professional Ethics. Concepts, Approaches and Typologies. Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):159 - 177.
    Marketing ethics is normally marketed as a sub-specialization of business ethics. In this paper, marketing ethics serves as an umbrella term for advertising, PR and sales ethics and as an example of professional ethics. To structure the paper, four approaches are distinguished, with a focus on typical professional conflicts, codes, roles or climates respectively. Since the moral climate approachis more inclusive than the other approaches, the last part of the paper deals mainly with moral climates, within the above-mentioned marketing sub-professions.
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  3. Jeremy Snyder (2009). Efficiency, Equity, and Price Gouging: A Response to Zwolinski. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (2):303-306.
    In this response, I reiterate my argument that price gouging undercuts the goal of equity in access to essential goods whereas Zwolinski emphasizes the importance of the efficient provision of essential goods above all other goals. I agree that the efficient provision of essential goods is important as I argue for the goal of equitable access to sufficient of the goods essential to living a minimally flourishing human life. However, efficiency is a means to this goal rather than the end (...)
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  4. Jeremy Snyder (2009). What's the Matter with Price Gouging? Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (2):275-293.
    When prices for basic commodities increase following a disaster, these price increases are often condemned as ‘price gouging’. In this paper, I discuss what moral wrongs, if any, are most reasonably ascribed to accusations of price gouging. This discussion keeps in mind both practical and moral defenses of price increase following disasters. I first examine existing antigouging legislation for commonalities in their definitions of gouging and then present arguments in favor of the permissibility of gouging, focusing on the economic benefits (...)
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  5. Bryn Williams-Jones & Vural Ozdemir (2008). Challenges for Corporate Ethics in Marketing Genetic Tests. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (1):33 - 44.
    Public discussions of ethical issues related to the biotechnology industry tend to treat “biotechnology” as a single, undifferentiated technology. Similarly, the pros and cons associated with this entire sector tend to get lumped together, such that individuals and groups often situate themselves as either “pro-” or “anti-” biotechnology as a whole. But different biotechnologies and their particular application context pose very different challenges for ethical corporate decision-making. Even within a single product category, different specialty products can pose strikingly different ethical (...)
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  6. Matt Zwolinski (2009). Price Gouging, Non-Worseness, and Distributive Justice. Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (2):295-306.
    This paper develops my position on the ethics of price gouging in response to Jeremy Snyder's article, "What's the Matter with Price Gouging." First, it explains how the "nonworseness claim" supports the moral permissibility of price gouging, even if it does not show that price gougers are morally virtuous agents. Second, it argues that questions about price gouging and distributive justice must be answered in light of the relevant possible institutional alternatives, and that Snyder's proposed alternatives to price gouging fare (...)
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