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  1. added 2016-05-30
    Fausto Caruana & Valentina Cuccio (forthcoming). Overcoming the Acting/Reasoning Dualism in Intelligent Behavior. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-5.
    In a paper that recently appeared in this journal, we proposed a model that aims at providing a comprehensive account of our ability to intelligently use tools, bridging sensorimotor and reasoning-based explanations of this ability. Central to our model is the notion of generalized motor programs for tool use, which we defined as a synthesis between classic motor programs, as described in the scientific literature, and Peircean habits. In his commentary, Osiurak proposes a critique of the notion of generalized motor (...)
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  2. added 2016-05-30
    Jona Vance & Dustin Stokes (forthcoming). Noise, Uncertainty, and Interest: Predictive Coding and Cognitive Penetration. Consciousness and Cognition.
    This paper asks: how do extant theorists of predictive coding conceptualize and explain possible instances of cognitive penetration? §I offers brief clarification of the predictive coding framework and relevant mechanisms, and a brief characterization of cognitive penetration and some challenges that come with defining it. §II develops more precise ways that the predictive coding framework can explain, and of course thereby allow for, genuine top-down causal effects on perceptual experience, of the kind discussed in the context of cognitive penetration. §III (...)
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  3. added 2016-05-30
    Gabriel Vacariu & Mihai Vacariu (2016). Sinele - o lume epistemologica [Self an epistemological world]. Datagroup.
  4. added 2016-05-29
    F. De Zela (forthcoming). Gleason-Type Theorem for Projective Measurements, Including Qubits: The Born Rule Beyond Quantum Physics. Foundations of Physics:1-14.
    Born’s quantum probability rule is traditionally included among the quantum postulates as being given by the squared amplitude projection of a measured state over a prepared state, or else as a trace formula for density operators. Both Gleason’s theorem and Busch’s theorem derive the quantum probability rule starting from very general assumptions about probability measures. Remarkably, Gleason’s theorem holds only under the physically unsound restriction that the dimension of the underlying Hilbert space \ must be larger than two. Busch’s theorem (...)
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  5. added 2016-05-29
    Sabina Lovibond (forthcoming). Wittgenstein, Tolstoy, and the “Apocalyptic View”. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116649715.
    Some aspects of Wittgenstein’s thought are considered in the light of a remark he makes about the “apocalyptic” view of the world. The influence of Tolstoy on Wittgenstein is discussed and elaborated with reference to the idea of a “form of life” as a locus of order, and also to that of “exceptionality” in an unfolding course of events—the latter setting up a connection with the “apocalyptic” theme. This imaginative backdrop remains discernible in Wittgenstein’s later philosophy, which draws upon it (...)
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  6. added 2016-05-29
    Gordon Belot (forthcoming). Sober as a Judge. Metascience.
    In Ockham's Razors: A User's Guide, argues that parsimony considerations are epistemically relevant on the grounds that certain methods of model selection, such as the Akaike Information Criterion, exhibit good asymptotic behaviour and take the number of adjustable parameters in a model into account. I raise some worries about this form of argument.
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  7. added 2016-05-29
    Dimitris Kilakos (2016). How Could Vygotsky Inform an Approach to Scientific Representations? Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 47 (1):140-152.
    In the quest for a new social turn in philosophy of science, exploring the prospects of a Vygotskian perspective could be of significant interest, especially due to his emphasis on the role of culture and socialisation in the development of cognitive functions. However, a philosophical reassessment of Vygotsky's ideas in general has yet to be done. As a step towards this direction, I attempt to elaborate an approach on scientific representations by drawing inspirations from Vygotsky. Specifically, I work upon Vygotsky’s (...)
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  8. added 2016-05-29
    Fraser MacBride (2015). "On The Origins of Order: Non-Symmetric or Only Symmetric Relations?". In M. J. Loux & G. Galuzzo (eds.), The Problem of Universals in Contemporary Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 173-94.
  9. added 2016-05-29
    Desmond Sander (2014). Mindful Physics — A New Account of What Happens. AENESIDEMUS PRESS.
    A physics that fails to take account of minds, or account for them, cannot be quite right; a physics that accounts so beautifully and so powerfully for so much of what we observe cannot be quite wrong. This book had that conundrum as its starting point, and resolves it. The mindful physics we need is complementary to the compelling and successful but mind-ignoring physics of today. It is the physics that life, especially human life, has made and is making here (...)
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  10. added 2016-05-28
    Antônio Carlos da Rocha Costa (forthcoming). Situated Ideological Systems: A Formal Concept, a Computational Notation, Some Applications. Axiomathes:1-64.
    This paper introduces a formal concept of ideology and ideological system. The formalization takes ideologies and ideological systems to be situated in agent societies. An ideological system is defined as a system of operations able to create, maintain, and extinguish the ideologies adopted by the social groups of agent societies. The concepts of group ideology, ideological contradiction, ideological dominance, and dominant ideology of an agent society, are defined. An ideology-based concept of social group is introduced. Relations between the proposed formal (...)
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  11. added 2016-05-28
    Finnur Dellsén (forthcoming). Review of Reason and Explanation: A Defense of Explanatory Coheretism, by Ted Poston. [REVIEW] Dialectica.
  12. added 2016-05-28
    Daniel Dohrn (2011). Counterfactual Explanation in Literature and the Social Sciences. In D. Birke & M. Butter (eds.), Counterfactual Thinking, Counterfactual Writing. DeGruyter 45-61.
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  13. added 2016-05-27
    Enrique Morata, Máquinas y superorganismos.
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  14. added 2016-05-27
    Laura Schlingloff & Richard Moore (forthcoming). Do Chimpanzees Conform to Cultural Norms? In Kristin Andrews Jacob Beck (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Animal Mind. Routledge
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  15. added 2016-05-27
    Peter Langland-Hassan (forthcoming). Imagining Experiences. Noûs.
    It is often held that in imagining experiences we exploit a special imagistic way of representing mentality—one that enables us to think about mental states in terms of what it is like to have them. According to some, when this way of thinking about the mind is paired with more objective means, an explanatory gap between the phenomenal and physical features of mental states arises. This paper advances a view along those lines, but with a twist. What many take for (...)
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  16. added 2016-05-27
    John G. Gunnell (forthcoming). Social Inquiry and the Pursuit of Reality Cora Diamond and the Problem of Criticizing From “Outside”. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116649714.
    Although social scientists have been devoted to discovering specific realities of social life, many theorists devoted to critical judgment have turned to philosophy in search of universal grounds of truth and reality. They have, however, worried about the problem of relativism. Although Wittgenstein has often been characterized as a relativist, Cora Diamond, inspired by G. E. M Anscombe, argues that his work, despite internal tensions, provides rational grounds for external criticism of social practices. Her argument and her critique of the (...)
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  17. added 2016-05-27
    Albert Ogien (forthcoming). Obligation and Impersonality Wittgenstein and the Nature of the Social. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393116649970.
    Although sociologists conceive obligation as an objective force that compels individuals to act and think according to pre-defined norms of conduct and ways of reasoning, philosophers view it as an imperative that is met through the agent’s deliberation. The aim of this article is to undermine the standard dichotomy between the deterministically sociological and the moral–philosophical views of obligation by way of contending that Wittgenstein’s view on blind obedience bears a conception of the social. I will then argue that Wittgenstein’s (...)
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  18. added 2016-05-27
    Andrew Spear, Werner Cuesters & Barry Smith (forthcoming). Functions in Basic Formal Ontology. Applied Ontology 11.
    The notion of function is indispensable to our understanding of distinctions such as that between being broken and being in working order (for artifacts) and between being diseased and being healthy (for organisms). A clear account of the ontology of functions and functioning is thus an important desideratum for any top-level ontology intended for application to domains such as engineering or medicine. The benefit of using top-level ontologies in applied ontology can only be realized when each of the categories identified (...)
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  19. added 2016-05-27
    Douglas Allchin & Alexander J. Werth (forthcoming). The Naturalizing Error. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie:1-16.
    We describe an error type that we call the naturalizing error: an appeal to nature as a self-justified description dictating or limiting our choices in moral, economic, political, and other social contexts. Normative cultural perspectives may be subtly and subconsciously inscribed into purportedly objective descriptions of nature, often with the apparent warrant and authority of science, yet not be fully warranted by a systematic or complete consideration of the evidence. Cognitive processes may contribute further to a failure to notice the (...)
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  20. added 2016-05-27
    Jun Otsuka (forthcoming). A Critical Review of the Statisticalist Debate. Biology and Philosophy:1-24.
    Over the past decade philosophers of biology have discussed whether evolutionary theory is a causal theory or a phenomenological study of evolution based solely on the statistical features of a population. This article reviews this controversy from three aspects, respectively concerning the assumptions, applications, and explanations of evolutionary theory, with a view to arriving at a definite conclusion in each contention. In so doing I also argue that an implicit methodological assumption shared by both sides of the debate, namely the (...)
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  21. added 2016-05-27
    Itay Snir & Yuval Eylon (forthcoming). Pedagogy of Non-Domination: Neo-Republican Political Theory and Critical Education. Policy Futures in Education.
    The neo-republican political philosophy (sometimes referred to as civic republicanism) advances the idea of freedom as non-domination, in an attempt to provide democracy with a solid normative foundation upon which concrete principles and institutions can be erected so as to make freedom a reality. However, attempts to develop a republican educational theory are still hesitant, and fail to take the republican radical conception of freedom to its full conclusions. This article suggests that dialogue between neo-republicanism and critical pedagogy can be (...)
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  22. added 2016-05-27
    Helge Kragh (2015). The Quantum Dissidents. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1237-1239.
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  23. added 2016-05-27
    Elizabeth Redman & William Sandoval (2015). The Contextual Nature of Scientists’ Views of Theories, Experimentation, and Their Coordination. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1079-1102.
    Practicing scientists’ views of science recently have become a topic of interest to nature of science researchers. Using an interview protocol developed by Carey and Smith that assumes respondents’ views cohere into a single belief system, we asked 15 research chemists to discuss their views of theories and experimentation. Respondents expressed a range of ideas about science during interviews, but in ways that defied assignment to a unitary, coherent belief system. Instead, scientists expressed more or less constructivist ideas depending upon (...)
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  24. added 2016-05-27
    Alessandro Minelli (2015). Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives on Evolution and Development. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1231-1235.
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  25. added 2016-05-27
    James Andow & Florian Cova (2015). Why Compatibilist Intuitions Are Not Mistaken: A Reply to Feltz and Millan. Philosophical Psychology 29 (4):550-566.
    In the past decade, a number of empirical researchers have suggested that laypeople have compatibilist intuitions. In a recent paper, Feltz and Millan have challenged this conclusion by claiming that most laypeople are only compatibilists in appearance and are in fact willing to attribute free will to people no matter what. As evidence for this claim, they have shown that an important proportion of laypeople still attribute free will to agents in fatalistic universes. In this paper, we first argue that (...)
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  26. added 2016-05-27
    Cibelle Silva & Alexandre Bagdonas (2015). Enhancing Teachers’ Awareness About Relations Between Science and Religion. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1173-1199.
    Educators advocate that science education can help the development of more responsible worldviews when students learn not only scientific concepts, but also about science, or “nature of science”. Cosmology can help the formation of worldviews because this topic is embedded in socio-cultural and religious issues. Indeed, during the Cold War period, the cosmological controversy between Big Bang and Steady State theory was tied up with political and religious arguments. The present paper discusses a didactic sequence developed for and applied in (...)
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  27. added 2016-05-27
    Hilton Japyassú (2015). Not Such Nature. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1271-1283.
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  28. added 2016-05-27
    Agustín Adúriz-Bravo (2015). Recent Semantic Developments on Models. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1245-1250.
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  29. added 2016-05-27
    Pablo Archila (2015). Using History and Philosophy of Science to Promote Students’ Argumentation. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1201-1226.
    This article describes the effect of a teaching–learning sequence based on the discovery of oxygen in promoting students’ argumentation. It examines the written and oral arguments produced by 63 high school students in France during a complete TLS supervised by the same teacher. The data used in this analysis was derived from students’ written responses, audio and video recordings, and written field notes. The first goal of this investigation was to provide evidence that an approach combining history and philosophy of (...)
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  30. added 2016-05-27
    Arantza Etxeberria (2015). Is Increasing Autonomy a Factor of Evolution? Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1257-1262.
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  31. added 2016-05-27
    Julia Skolnik (2015). Why Are Girls and Women Underrepresented in STEM, and What Can Be Done About It? Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1301-1306.
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  32. added 2016-05-27
    Malin Ideland, Andreas Redfors, Lena Hansson & Lotta Leden (2015). Teachers’ Ways of Talking About Nature of Science and Its Teaching. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1141-1172.
    Nature of science has for a long time been regarded as a key component in science teaching. Much research has focused on students’ and teachers’ views of NOS, while less attention has been paid to teachers’ perspectives on NOS teaching. This article focuses on in-service science teachers’ ways of talking about NOS and NOS teaching, e.g. what they talk about as possible and valuable to address in the science classroom, in Swedish compulsory school. These teachers are, according to the national (...)
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  33. added 2016-05-27
    Charbel El-Hani, Alice Wong, Ross Nehm & Kostas Kampourakis (2015). Peer Review and Darwinian Selection. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1055-1057.
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  34. added 2016-05-27
    Tania Lombrozo & Daniel Wilkenfeld (2015). Inference to the Best Explanation Versus Explaining for the Best Inference. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1059-1077.
    In pedagogical contexts and in everyday life, we often come to believe something because it would best explain the data. What is it about the explanatory endeavor that makes it essential to everyday learning and to scientific progress? There are at least two plausible answers. On one view, there is something special about having true explanations. This view is highly intuitive: it’s clear why true explanations might improve one’s epistemic position. However, there is another possibility—it could be that the process (...)
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  35. added 2016-05-27
    María Jiménez-Aleixandre (2015). Reconceptualizing the Nature of Science. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1241-1244.
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  36. added 2016-05-27
    Ivan Cunha (2015). Using History of Philosophy in Philosophy of Science. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1251-1253.
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  37. added 2016-05-27
    Jon Kyllingstad & Ageliki Lefkaditou (2015). Discussing the Biocultural Approach to Race. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1263-1269.
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  38. added 2016-05-27
    Valarie Akerson, Heidi Masters & Khadija Fouad (2015). Using History of Science to Teach Nature of Science to Elementary Students. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1103-1140.
    Science lessons using inquiry only or history of science with inquiry were used for explicit reflective nature of science instruction for second-, third-, and fourth-grade students randomly assigned to receive one of the treatments. Students in both groups improved in their understanding of creative NOS, tentative NOS, empirical NOS, and subjective NOS as measured using VNOS-D as pre- and post-test surveys. Social and cultural context of science was not accessible for the students. Students in second, third, and fourth grades were (...)
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  39. added 2016-05-27
    Brian Leahy (2015). Simplicity and Elegance in Millikan’s Account of Productivity: Reply to Martinez. Philosophical Psychology 29 (4):503-516.
    This paper responds to a problem, raised by Martinez, for Millikan’s explanation of the interpretability of novel signs in terms of mapping functions. I argue that Martinez’s critique is a logically weakened version of Kripke’s skeptical argument about rule following. Responding to Martinez requires two things. First, we must correctly understand the role of simplicity and elegance in choosing the correct mapping function for a signaling system. Second, we need to understand that mapping functions are descriptions of (...)
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  40. added 2016-05-27
    Michael Ruse (2015). Creationism Takes its Message to Europe. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1227-1230.
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  41. added 2016-05-27
    Peter Bowler (2015). Darwin and Islam. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1255-1256.
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  42. added 2016-05-27
    Nei de Nunes-Neto (2015). The Environmental Crisis as a Good Case for an Intellectual and Practical Integration Between Philosophy and Science. Science and Education 24 (9 - 10):1285-1299.
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  43. added 2016-05-27
    Gordon Pennycook, James Allan Cheyne, Nathaniel Barr, Derek J. Koehler & Jonathan A. Fugelsang (2014). Cognitive Style and Religiosity: The Role of Conflict Detection. Memory and Cognition 42 (1):1-10.
    Recent research has indicated a negative relation between the propensity for analytic reasoning and religious beliefs and practices. Here, we propose conflict detection as a mechanism underlying this relation, on the basis of the hypothesis that more-analytic people are less religious, in part, because they are more sensitive to conflicts between immaterial religious beliefs and beliefs about the material world. To examine cognitive conflict sensitivity, we presented problems containing stereotypes that conflicted with base-rate probabilities in a task with no religious (...)
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  44. added 2016-05-27
    Etienne P. LeBel & Christopher J. Wilbur (2013). Big Secrets Do Not Necessarily Cause Hills to Appear Steeper. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review.
    Slepian, Masicampo, Toosi, and Ambady found that individuals recalling and writing about a big, meaningful secret judged a pictured hill as steeper than did those who recalled and wrote about a small, inconsequential secret. From an embodied cognition perspective, this result was interpreted as suggesting that important secrets weigh people down. Answering to mounting calls for the crucial need of independent direct replications of published findings to ensure the self-correcting nature of our science, we sought to corroborate Slepian et al.’s (...)
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  45. added 2016-05-27
    Gordon Pennycook, James Allan Cheyne, Derek J. Koehler & Jonathan A. Fugelsang (2013). Belief Bias During Reasoning Among Religious Believers and Skeptics. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 20 (4):806-811.
    We provide evidence that religious skeptics, as compared to believers, are both more reflective and effective in logical reasoning tasks. While recent studies have reported a negative association between an analytic cognitive style and religiosity, they focused exclusively on accuracy, making it difficult to specify potential underlying cognitive mechanisms. The present study extends the previous research by assessing both performance and response times on quintessential logical reasoning problems. Those reporting more religious skepticism made fewer reasoning errors than did believers. This (...)
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  46. added 2016-05-27
    Kevin P. Tobia, Wesley Buckwalter & Stephen Stich (2012). Moral Intuitions: Are Philosophers Experts? Philosophical Psychology:1-10.
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  47. added 2016-05-27
    Amitai Shenhav, David G. Rand & Joshua D. Greene (2012). Divine Intuition: Cognitive Style Influences Belief in God. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (3):423.
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  48. added 2016-05-27
    Gordon Pennycook & Valerie A. Thompson (2012). Reasoning with Base Rates is Routine, Relatively Effortless, and Context Dependent. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 19 (3):528-534.
    We tested models of base rate “neglect” using a novel paradigm. Participants judged the probability that a hypothetical person belonged to one of two categories on the basis of either a personality description alone or the personality description and a base rate probability. When base rates and descriptions were congruent, judgments in the BR condition were higher and more uniform than those in the NoBR condition. In contrast, base rates had a polarizing effect on judgments when they were incongruent with (...)
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  49. added 2016-05-27
    Nathaniel D. Daw, Samuel J. Gershman, Ben Seymour, Peter Dayan & Raymond J. Dolan (2011). Model-Based Influences on Humans' Choices and Striatal Prediction Errors. Neuron 69 (6):1204-1215.
    The mesostriatal dopamine system is prominently implicated in model-free reinforcement learning, with fMRI BOLD signals in ventral striatum notably covarying with model-free prediction errors. However, latent learning and devaluation studies show that behavior also shows hallmarks of model-based planning, and the interaction between model-based and model-free values, prediction errors, and preferences is underexplored. We designed a multistep decision task in which model-based and model-free influences on human choice behavior could be distinguished. By showing that choices reflected both influences we could (...)
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  50. added 2016-05-27
    Nicole M. Else-Quest, Janet Shibley Hyde & Marcia C. Linn (2010). Cross-National Patterns of Gender Differences in Mathematics: A Meta-Analysis. Psychological Bulletin 136 (1):103-127.
    [Correction Notice: An erratum for this article was reported in Vol 136 of Psychological Bulletin. On page 118 of the article “Cross-National Patterns of Gender Differences in Mathematics: A Meta-Analysis,” by Nicole M. Else-Quest, Janet Shibley Hyde, and Marcia C. Linn, the images on Figures 1 and 2 are incorrectly reversed. The legends for Figures 1 and 2 are in the correct order.] A gender gap in mathematics achievement persists in some nations but not in others. In light of the (...)
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