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  1. and J. Larrazabal A. Clark, J. Ezquerro (ed.) (1996). Philosophy and Cognitive Science: Categories, Consciousness, and Reasoning. Kluwer.
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  2. Robert P. Abelson (1979). Imagining the Purpose of Imagery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):548-549.
  3. M. Abram, L. Picard, B. Navarro & P. Piolino (2014). Mechanisms of Remembering the Past and Imagining the Future – New Data From Autobiographical Memory Tasks in a Lifespan Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 29:76-89.
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  4. Ekaterina Abramova & Marc Slors (2015). Social Cognition in Simple Action Coordination: A Case for Direct Perception. Consciousness and Cognition 36:519-531.
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  5. Fred Adams & Kenneth Campbell (1999). Modality and Abstract Concepts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):610-610.
    Our concerns fall into three areas: (1) Barsalou fails to make clear what simulators are (vs. what they do); (2) activation of perceptual areas of the brain during thought does not distinguish between the activation's being constitutive of concepts or a mere causal consequence (Barsalou needs the former); and (3) Barsalou's attempt to explain how modal symbols handle abstraction fails.
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  6. Jack A. Adams, Ernest T. Goetz & Phillip H. Marshall (1972). Response Feedback and Motor Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):391.
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  7. Hannah Ahlheim (2013). Governing the World of Wakefulness: The Exploration of Alertness, Performance, and Brain Activity with the Help of “Stay‐Awake‐Men” (1884–1964). [REVIEW] Anthropology of Consciousness 24 (2):117-136.
    In January 1959, famous radio DJ Peter Tripp stayed awake for 200 hours in a glass booth on Times Square, exposing his weakening body and distracted sleepless mind to the public. Tripp's playing with the borderlines of consciousness was a media attraction, but the DJ also served as a guinea pig for scientific research. From the late 19th century on, several experts had tried to explore the world of wakefulness by observing stay-awake-men. With their help, researchers tested methods of measuring (...)
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  8. Anne M. Aimola Davies, Stephen Waterman, Rebekah C. White & Martin Davies (2013). When You Fail to See What You Were Told to Look For: Inattentional Blindness and Task Instructions. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):221-230.
    Inattentional blindness studies have shown that an unexpected object may go unnoticed if it does not share the property specified in the task instructions. Our aim was to demonstrate that observers develop an attentional set for a property not specified in the task instructions if it allows easier performance of the primary task. Three experiments were conducted using a dynamic selective-looking paradigm. Stimuli comprised four black squares and four white diamonds, so that shape and colour varied together. Task instructions specified (...)
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  9. Anne M. Aimola Davies, Rebekah C. White & Martin Davies (2013). Spatial Limits on the Nonvisual Self-Touch Illusion and the Visual Rubber Hand Illusion: Subjective Experience of the Illusion and Proprioceptive Drift. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):613-636.
    The nonvisual self-touch rubber hand paradigm elicits the compelling illusion that one is touching one’s own hand even though the two hands are not in contact. In four experiments, we investigated spatial limits of distance and alignment on the nonvisual self-touch illusion and the well-known visual rubber hand illusion. Common procedures and common assessment methods were used. Subjective experience of the illusion was assessed by agreement ratings for statements on a questionnaire and time of illusion onset. The nonvisual self-touch illusion (...)
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  10. Vivien Ainley, Lara Maister, Jana Brokfeld, Harry Farmer & Manos Tsakiris (2013). More of Myself: Manipulating Interoceptive Awareness by Heightened Attention to Bodily and Narrative Aspects of the Self. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1231-1238.
    Psychology distinguishes between a bodily and a narrative self. Within neuroscience, models of the bodily self are based on exteroceptive sensorimotor processes or on the integration of interoceptive sensations. Recent research has revealed interactions between interoceptive and exteroceptive processing of self-related information, for example that mirror self-observation can improve interoceptive awareness. Using heartbeat perception, we measured the effect on interoceptive awareness of two experimental manipulations, designed to heighten attention to bodily and narrative aspects of the self. Participants (...)
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  11. E. Airapetyantz & K. Bykov (1945). Physiological Experiments and the Psychology of the Subconscious. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 5 (4):577-593.
  12. Alaitz Aizpurua & Wilma Koutstaal (2015). A Matter of Focus: Detailed Memory in the Intentional Autobiographical Recall of Older and Younger Adults. Consciousness and Cognition 33:145-155.
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  13. Thorsten Albrecht & Uwe Mattler (2016). Individually Different Weighting of Multiple Processes Underlies Effects of Metacontrast Masking. Consciousness and Cognition 42:162-180.
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  14. Thorsten Albrecht & Uwe Mattler (2012). Individual Differences in Metacontrast Masking Regarding Sensitivity and Response Bias. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1222-1231.
    In metacontrast masking target visibility is modulated by the time until a masking stimulus appears. The effect of this temporal delay differs across participants in such a way that individual human observers’ performance shows distinguishable types of masking functions which remain largely unchanged for months. Here we examined whether individual differences in masking functions depend on different response criteria in addition to differences in discrimination sensitivity. To this end we reanalyzed previously published data and conducted a new experiment for further (...)
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  15. K. Albus (1985). A Microelectrode Study of the Spatial Arrangement of Iso-Orientation Bands in the Cat's Striate Cortex. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 485--491.
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  16. Ben Alderson-Day & Charles Fernyhough (2014). More Than One Voice: Investigating the Phenomenological Properties of Inner Speech Requires a Variety of Methods. Consciousness and Cognition 24:113-114.
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  17. Ben Alderson-Day, Simon McCarthy-Jones, Sarah Bedford, Hannah Collins, Holly Dunne, Chloe Rooke & Charles Fernyhough (2014). Shot Through with Voices: Dissociation Mediates the Relationship Between Varieties of Inner Speech and Auditory Hallucination Proneness. Consciousness and Cognition 27:288-296.
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  18. Michael P. Alexander (2002). Disorders of Language After Frontal Lobe Injury: Evidence for the Neural Mechanisms Of. In Donald T. Stuss & Robert T. Knight (eds.), Principles of Frontal Lobe Function. Oxford University Press 159.
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  19. Prescott Alexander, Alexander Schlegel, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Adina L. Roskies, Thalia Wheatley & Peter Ulric Tse (2016). Readiness Potentials Driven by Non-Motoric Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 39:38-47.
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  20. Daniel Algom (2009). Slippery Platform: The Role of Automatic and Intentional Processes in Testing the Effect of Notation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):328-329.
    The type of processing of numerical dimensions varies greatly and is governed by context. Considering this flexibility in tandem with a fuzzy demarcation line between automatic and intentional processes, it is suggested that testing the effect of notation should not be confined to automatic processing, in particular to passive viewing. Recent behavioral data satisfying the authors' stipulations reveal a considerable, though perhaps not exclusive, core of common abstract processing.
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  21. J. Allancheyne & T. Girard (2007). The Nature and Varieties of Felt Presence Experiences: A Reply to Nielsen☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):984-991.
    Nielsen [Nielsen, T. . Felt presence: Paranoid delusion or hallucinatory social imagery? Consciousness and Cognition, 16, 975–983.] raises a number of issues and presents several provocative arguments worthy of discussion regarding the experience of the felt presence during sleep paralysis . We consider these issues beginning with the nature of FP and its relation to affective-motivational systems and provide an alternative to Nielsen’s reduction of FP to a purely spatial hallucination. We then consider implications of the “normal social imagery” model. (...)
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  22. Carsten Allefeld (2008). What Can We Learn From Merleau-Ponty's Ontology for a Science of Consciousness? Mind and Matter 6 (2):235-255.
    Representative for contemporary attempts to establish a science of consciousness we examine Chalmers' statement and resolution of the 'hard problem of consciousness'. Agreeing with him that in order to account for subjectivity it is necessary to expand the ontology of the natural sciences, we argue that it is not sufficient to just add conscious experience to the list of fundamental features of the world. Instead, we turn to phenomenology as the philosophy of conscious experience and give an outline of Merleau-Ponty's (...)
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  23. Carsten Allefeld, Peter Pütz, Kristina Kastner & Jiří Wackermann (2011). Flicker-Light Induced Visual Phenomena: Frequency Dependence and Specificity of Whole Percepts and Percept Features. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1344-1362.
    Flickering light induces visual hallucinations in human observers. Despite a long history of the phenomenon, little is known about the dependence of flicker-induced subjective impressions on the flicker frequency. We investigate this question using Ganzfeld stimulation and an experimental paradigm combining a continuous frequency scan with a focus on re-occurring, whole percepts. On the single-subject level, we find a high degree of frequency stability of percepts. To generalize across subjects, we apply two rating systems, a set of complex percept classes (...)
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  24. Allison K. Allen, Kevin Wilkins, Adam Gazzaley & Ezequiel Morsella (2013). Conscious Thoughts From Reflex-Like Processes: A New Experimental Paradigm for Consciousness Research. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1318-1331.
    The contents of our conscious mind can seem unpredictable, whimsical, and free from external control. When instructed to attend to a stimulus in a work setting, for example, one might find oneself thinking about household chores. Conscious content thus appears different in nature from reflex action. Under the appropriate conditions, reflexes occur predictably, reliably, and via external control. Despite these intuitions, theorists have proposed that, under certain conditions, conscious content resembles reflexes and arises reliably via external control. We introduce the (...)
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  25. L. Alpert Judith (1995). Trauma, Dissociation, and Clinical Study as a Responsible Beginning. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):125-129.
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  26. Judith L. Alpert (1995). Trauma, Dissociation, and Clinical Study as a Responsible Beginning. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):125-129.
  27. Adrian J. T. Alsmith & Matthew R. Longo (2014). Where Exactly Am I? Self-Location Judgements Distribute Between Head and Torso. Consciousness and Cognition 24:70-74.
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  28. Ettore Ambrosini, Claudia Scorolli, Anna M. Borghi & Marcello Costantini (2012). Which Body for Embodied Cognition? Affordance and Language Within Actual and Perceived Reaching Space. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1551-1557.
    The mental representation of one’s own body does not necessarily correspond to the physical body. For instance, a dissociation between perceived and actual reach-ability has been shown, that is, individuals perceive that they can reach objects that are out of grasp. We presented participants with 3D pictures of objects located at four different distances, namely near-reaching space, actual-reaching space, perceived-reaching space and non-reaching space. Immediately after they were presented with function, manipulation, observation or pointing verbs and were required to judge (...)
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  29. Daniel J. Amit (1997). Is Synchronization Necessary and is It Sufficient? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):683-684.
    The strong coupling of binding to cross-correlations is methodologically problematic. A completely unstructured network of neurons can produce cross-correlations very similar to the measured ones, and yet they have little dynamic effect.
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  30. Manos Tsakiris Ana Tajadura-Jiménez, Matthew R. Longo, Rosie Coleman (2012). The Person in the Mirror: Using the Enfacement Illusion to Investigate the Experiential Structure of Self-Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1725.
    How do we acquire a mental representation of our own face? Recently, synchronous, but not asynchronous, interpersonal multisensory stimulation between one’s own and another person’s face has been used to evoke changes in self-identification . We investigated the conscious experience of these changes with principal component analyses that revealed that while the conscious experience during synchronous IMS focused on resemblance and similarity with the other’s face, during asynchronous IMS it focused on multisensory stimulation. Analyses of the identified common factor structure (...)
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  31. P. Anastasiadis, P. Anninos & E. Sivridis (1989). Biomagnetic Measurements of Fetal Brain Activity. In Rodney M. J. Cotterill (ed.), Models of Brain Function. Cambridge University Press 397--403.
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  32. F. Anceau (2000). Is Awareness a Framework for High-Level Cerebral Functions? Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S98 - S99.
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  33. George J. Andersen (2001). Are the Dorsal/Ventral Pathways Sufficiently Distinct to Resolve Perceptual Theory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):96-97.
    The author argues that the theory of a dorsal/ventral stream for visual processing can be used to reconcile the constructivist and direct perception theories. My commentary discusses neurophysiological and psychophysical studies that run counter to the view. In addition, the central issue of debate between the constructionist and direct perception approaches regarding what is visual information is discussed.
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  34. Hazel P. Anderson & Jamie Ward (2015). Principle Component Analyses of Questionnaires Measuring Individual Differences in Synaesthetic Phenomenology. Consciousness and Cognition 33:316-324.
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  35. Norman H. Anderson (1993). Nonconscious Sensation and Inner Psychophysics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):137.
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  36. R. Lanier Anderson (2002). Sensualism and Unconscious Representations in Nietzsche's Account of Knowledge. International Studies in Philosophy 34 (3):95-117.
  37. Rachel J. Anderson & Gemma L. Evans (2015). Mental Time Travel in Dysphoria: Differences in the Content and Subjective Experience of Past and Future Episodes. Consciousness and Cognition 37:237-248.
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  38. Rachel J. Anderson, Lien Peters & Stephen A. Dewhurst (2015). Episodic Elaboration: Investigating the Structure of Retrieved Past Events and Imagined Future Events. Consciousness and Cognition 33:112-124.
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  39. Robert M. Anderson & Joseph F. Gonsalves (1981). Sensory Suppression and the Unity of Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):99.
  40. J. Andrade (2000). Anaesthesia as a Tool for Exploring Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S19 - S20.
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  41. N. C. Andreasen (2011). A Journey Into Chaos: Creativity and the Unconscious. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):42.
    The capacity to be creative, to produce new concepts, ideas, inventions, objects or art, is perhaps the most important attribute of the human brain. We know very little, however, about the nature of creativity or its neural basis. Some important questions include how should we define creativity? How is it related (or unrelated) to high intelligence? What psychological processes or environmental circumstance cause creative insights to occur? How is it related to conscious and unconscious processes? What is happening at the (...)
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  42. Johannes Andres & Rainer Mausfeld (2008). Structural Description and Qualitative Content in Perception Theory. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):307-311.
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  43. P. Andrew Leynes (2003). A Reply to R. West's Comments on Leynes, Marsh, Hicks, Allen, and Mayhorn. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):25-30.
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  44. P. Andrew Leynes (2003). A Reply to R. West's Comments on Leynes, Marsh, Hicks, Allen, and Mayhorn. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):25-30.
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  45. Filomena Anelli, Anna M. Borghi & Roberto Nicoletti (2012). Grasping the Pain: Motor Resonance with Dangerous Affordances. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1627-1639.
    Two experiments, one on school-aged children and one on adults, explored the mechanisms underlying responses to an image prime followed by graspable objects that were, in certain cases, dangerous. Participants were presented with different primes and objects representing two risk levels . The task required that a natural/artifact categorization task be performed by pressing different keys. In both adults and children graspable objects activated a facilitating motor response, while dangerous objects evoked aversive affordances, generating an interference-effect. Both children and adults (...)
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  46. Stephanie M. Anglin (2014). I Think, Therefore I Am? Examining Conceptions of the Self, Soul, and Mind. Consciousness and Cognition 29:105-116.
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  47. Luiz Pessoa Anil K. Seth, Zoltán Dienes, Axel Cleeremans, Morten Overgaard (2008). Measuring Consciousness: Relating Behavioural and Neurophysiological Approaches. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (8):314.
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  48. Ulrich Ansorge, Wilfried Kunde & Markus Kiefer (2014). Unconscious Vision and Executive Control: How Unconscious Processing and Conscious Action Control Interact. Consciousness and Cognition 27:268-287.
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  49. Alessandro Antonietti (2011). Introspecting a Conscious Decision or the Consciousness of a Decision? Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1916-1917.
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  50. Alessandro Antonietti & Antonella Corradini (2013). Mirroring Mirror Neurons in an Interdisciplinary Debate. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):1092-1094.
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1 — 50 / 17456