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  1. H. A. Abramson (ed.) (1954). Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the Fifth Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.
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  2. H. A. Abramson (ed.) (1953). Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the Fourth Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.
  3. H. A. Abramson (ed.) (1952). Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the Third Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.
  4. H. A. Abramson (ed.) (1951). Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the Second Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.
  5. H. A. Abramson (ed.) (1950). Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the First Conference. Josiah Macy Foundation.
  6. S. Ackers (2001). Consciousness, Art and Media: Reflections on Mediated Experience. In Paavo Pylkkanen & Tere Vaden (eds.), Dimensions of Conscious Experience. John Benjamins. 37--179.
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  7. Igor L. Aleksander (2005). The World in My Mind, My Mind in the World. Thorverton UK: Imprint Academic.
    Ifeel that Iam apartof, but separatefrom an 'out there' world. 2. Ifeel that my perception of the world mingles with feelings of past experience. 3. My experienceof the world is selective and purposeful. 4. I am thinking ahead allthe timeintrying ...
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  8. Anthony P. Atkinson, Michael S. C. Thomas & Axel Cleeremans (2000). Consciousness: Mapping the Theoretical Landscape. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (10):372-382.
    What makes us conscious? Many theories that attempt to answer this question have appeared recently in the context of widespread interest about consciousness in the cognitive neurosciences. Most of these proposals are formulated in terms of the information processing conducted by the brain. In this overview, we survey and contrast these models. We first delineate several notions of consciousness, addressing what it is that the various models are attempting to explain. Next, we describe a conceptual landscape that addresses how the (...)
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  9. Bernard J. Baars & J. B. Newman (eds.) (2001). Essential Sources in the Scientific Study of Consciousness. MIT Press.
    Current thinking and research on consciousness and the brain.
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  10. Talis Bachmann (2000). Microgenetic Approach to the Conscious Mind. Amsterdam: J Benjamins.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 10 sider ad gangen og max. 40 sider pr. session.
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  11. Renate Bartsch (2002). Consciousness Emerging: The Dynamics of Perception, Imagination, Action, Memory, Thought, and Language. John Benjamins.
  12. A. Bielecki, Andrzej Kokoszka & P. Holas (2000). Dynamic Systems Theory Approach to Consciousness. International Journal of Neuroscience 104 (1):29-47.
  13. Susan J. Blackmore (2005). Consciousness: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    Consciousness, 'the last great mystery for science', has now become a hot topic. How can a physical brain create our experience of the world? What creates our identity? Do we really have free will? Could consciousness itself be an illusion? -/- Exciting new developments in brain science are opening up debates on these issues, and the field has now expanded to include biologists, neuroscientists, psychologists, and philosophers. This controversial book clarifies the potentially confusing arguments, and the major theories using illustrations, (...)
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  14. Susan J. Blackmore (2005). Conversations on Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    Written in a colloquial and engaging style the book records the conversations Sue had when she met these influential thinkers, whether at conferences in Arizona ...
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  15. Susan J. Blackmore (2003). Consciousness: An Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    Is there a theory that explains the essence of consciousness? Or is consciousness itself just an illusion? The "last great mystery of science," consciousness was excluded from serious research for most of the last century but is now a rapidly expanding area of study for students of psychology, philosophy, and neuroscience. Recently the topic has also captured growing popular interest. This groundbreaking book is the first volume to bring together all the major theories of consciousness studies--from those rooted in traditional (...)
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  16. Susan J. Blackmore (2003). Consciousness in Meme Machines. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (4):19-30.
    Setting aside the problems of recognising consciousness in a machine, this article considers what would be needed for a machine to have human-like conscious- ness. Human-like consciousness is an illusion; that is, it exists but is not what it appears to be. The illusion that we are a conscious self having a stream of experi- ences is constructed when memes compete for replication by human hosts. Some memes survive by being promoted as personal beliefs, desires, opinions and pos- sessions, leading (...)
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  17. Susan J. Blackmore (2001). State of the Art: Consciousness. Psychologist 14 (10):522-525.
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  18. Susan J. Blackmore (2001). The Psychology of Consciousness. The Psychologist 14:522-525.
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  19. Colin Blakemore & Susan A. Greenfield (1987). Mindwaves: Thoughts on Intelligence, Identity, and Consciousness. Blackwell.
  20. G. R. Bock & James L. Marsh (eds.) (1993). Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness. (Ciba Foundation Symposium 174).
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  21. J. Briggs (2001). Where's the Poetry? Consciousness as the Flight of Three Blackbirds. In Paavo Pylkkanen & Tere Vaden (eds.), Dimensions of Conscious Experience. John Benjamins. 37--157.
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  22. Robert Briscoe (forthcoming). Multisensory Processing and Perceptual Consciousness: Part I. Philosophy Compass.
    Multisensory processing encompasses all of the various ways in which the presence of information in one sensory modality can adaptively influence the processing of information in a different modality. In Part I of this survey article, I begin by presenting a cartography of some of the more extensively investigated forms of multisensory processing, with a special focus on two distinct types of multisensory integration. I briefly discuss the conditions under which these different forms of multisensory processing occur as well as (...)
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  23. Robert Briscoe & John Schwenkler (2015). Conscious Vision in Action. Cognitive Science 39 (2):n/a-n/a.
    It is natural to assume that the fine-grained and highly accurate spatial information present in visual experience is often used to guide our bodily actions. Yet this assumption has been challenged by proponents of the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis , according to which visuomotor programming is the responsibility of a “zombie” processing stream whose sources of bottom-up spatial information are entirely non-conscious . In many formulations of TVSH, the role of conscious vision in action is limited to “recognizing objects, selecting (...)
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  24. V. Bruce (ed.) (1997). Unsolved Mysteries of the Mind: Tutorial Essays in Cognition. Taylor and Francis.
    The book complements standard course texts in cognition by providing a series of articles which emphasize particularly what we do not understand, rather than ...
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  25. Glenn Carruthers (2010). A Problem for Wegner and Colleagues' Model of the Sense of Agency. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):341-357.
    The sense of agency, that is the sense that one is the agent of one’s bodily actions, is one component of our self-consciousness. Recently, Wegner and colleagues have developed a model of the causal history of this sense. Their model takes it that the sense of agency is elicited for an action when one infers that one or other of one’s mental states caused that action. In their terms, the sense of agency is elicited by the inference to apparent mental (...)
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  26. R. Carter (2002). Exploring Consciousness. University of California Press.
    The book also discusses how traditional approaches--philosophical, scientific, and experiential--might be brought together to create a more complete...
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  27. Michel Cazenave (ed.) (1984). Science And Consciousness: Two Views Of The Universe. Ny: Pergamon Press.
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  28. David J. Chalmers (1994). Review of Journal of Consciousness Studies. [REVIEW] Times Literary Supplement.
    How does conscious experience emerge from a physical basis? At a first glance, this is the question about the mind that most needs answering. So it is curious that those who study the mind professionally have often avoided the question entirely. In psychology, the cognitive revolution did not make consciousness respectable: most cognitive psychologists have stuck to subjects such as learning, memory, and perception instead. Neuroscientists have been known to speculate on the topic, but usually only late at night, after (...)
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  29. C. R. Chapman & Yutaka Nakamura (1999). A Passion of the Soul: An Introduction to Pain for Consciousness Researchers. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (4):391-422.
    Pain is an important focus for consciousness research because it is an avenue for exploring somatic awareness, emotion, and the genesis of subjectivity. In principle, pain is awareness of tissue trauma, but pain can occur in the absence of identifiable injury, and sometimes substantive tissue injury produces no pain. The purpose of this paper is to help bridge pain research and consciousness studies. It reviews the basic sensory neurophysiology associated with tissue injury, including transduction, transmission, modulation, and central representation. In (...)
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  30. Haridas Chaudhuri (1970). The Integral View of Consciousness. International Philosophical Quarterly 10 (June):204-219.
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  31. Jonathan D. Cohen & Jonathan W. Schooler (eds.) (1997). Scientific Approaches to Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum.
  32. Allan Combs & Stanley Krippner (2007). Structures of Consciousness and Creativity: Opening the Doors of Perception. In Ruth Richards (ed.), Everyday Creativity and New Views of Human Nature: Psychological, Social, and Spiritual Perspectives. American Psychological Association. 131-149.
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  33. J. Cornwell (ed.) (1998). Consciousness and Human Identity. Oxford University Press.
  34. Rodney M. J. Cotterill (2000). Enchanted Looms: Conscious Networks in Brains and Computers. Cambridge University Press.
    The title of this book was inspired by a passage in Charles Sherrington's Man on his Nature.
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  35. Rodney M. J. Cotterill (2000). On Brain and Mind. Brain and Mind 1 (2):237-244.
    An easily-accessible introduction is provided for theauthor''s book Enchanted Looms , which is reviewedelsewhere in this volume by Jesse Prinz and by MarcelKinsbourne, and also for the article Didconsciousness evolve from self-paced probing of theenvironment, and not from reflexes? , which alsoappears in this volume and which summarises theauthor''s more recent thoughts on consciousness.
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  36. Donelson Dulany (2008). How Well Are We Moving Toward a Most Productive Science of Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (12):75-98.
    Commentary on the Toward a Science of Consciousness Conference, Tucson 2008.
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  37. Donelson E. Dulany (2003). Strategies for Putting Consciousness in its Place. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (1):33-43.
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  38. Gerald M. Edelman (2004). Wider Than the Sky: The Phenomenal Gift of Consciousness. Yale University Press.
    Concise and understandable, the book explains pertinent findings of modern neuroscience and describes how consciousness arises in complex brains.
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  39. Gerald M. Edelman & Giulio Tononi (2000). A Universe of Consciousness: How Matter Becomes Imagination. Basic Books.
    A Nobel Prize-winning scientist and a leading brain researcher show how the brain creates conscious experience.
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  40. Gerald Edelman & Giulio Tononi (2001). A Universe of Consciousness: How Matter Becomes Imagination. Basic Books.
    A Nobel Prize-winning scientist and a leading brain researcher show how the brain creates conscious experience.
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  41. Russell Epstein (2004). Consciousness, Art, and the Brain: Lessons From Marcel Proust. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):213-40.
    In his novel Remembrance of Things Past, Marcel Proust argues that conventional descriptions of the phenomenology of consciousness are incomplete because they focus too much on the highly-salient sensory information that dominates each moment of awareness and ignore the network of associations that lies in the background. In this paper, I explicate Proust’s theory of conscious experience and show how it leads him directly to a theory of aesthetic perception. Proust’s division of awareness into two components roughly corresponds to William (...)
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  42. Bill Faw (2006). 'Are We Studying Consciousness Yet?': Toward a Science of Consciousness--Tucson Conference, April 4-8, 2006. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (4):94-112.
    Conference Report for Toward a Science of Consciousness Tucson Conference, April 4- 8, 2006.
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  43. Bill Faw (2006). Are We Studying Consciousness Yet? Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (4):94-112.
    Conference Report for Toward a Science of Consciousness Tucson Conference, April 4- 8, 2006.
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  44. Bill Faw (2005). What We Know and What We Don't About Consciousness Science. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (7):74-86.
    A Review of ASSC-9 at Cal-Tech, June 24-27, 2005.
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  45. Bill Faw (2003). Models and Mechanisms of Consciousness: Report on ASSC-7 in Memphis: May 30-June 2, 2003. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (8):79-89.
    In the town where Elvis' occurrent consciousness status is periodically asserted, the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness held another great conference. The King of rockabilly did not show, but many stars of consciousness- and related-gigs did, such as Ned Block, Walter Freeman, Bernie Baars, Alva Noë, Dan Dennett, Christof Koch, Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, Peter Carruthers and Petra Stoerig. Even though this was my fifth ASSC conference I had never heard the famous Freeman nor the devilish Dennett before. There were (...)
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  46. Melanie Ferrari, Adrien Pinard & K. Runions (2001). Piaget's Framework for a Scientific Study of Consciousness. Human Development 44 (4):195-213.
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  47. Michel Ferrari & Adrien Pinard (2006). Death and Resurrection of a Disciplined Science of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (12):75-96.
    The Latin conscius does not translate anything like mind or consciousness. Only in the mid-nineteenth century do we find the first attempts to study consciousness as its own discipline. Wundt, James, and Freud disagreed about how to approach the science of consciousness, although agreeing that psychology was a 'science of consciousness' that takes lived biological experience as its object. The behaviorists vetoed this idea. By the 1950s, for cognitive science, mind (conscious and unconscious) was considered analogous to computer software. Recently, (...)
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  48. Christopher D. Frith & Geraint Rees (2007). A Brief History of the Scientific Approach to the Study of Consciousness. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.
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  49. Volker Gadenne (2006). Consciousness: Psychological, Neuroscientific, and Cultural Perspectives. In Kurt Pawlik & Gery d'Ydewalle (eds.), Psychological Concepts: An International Historical Perspective. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.
  50. Jeffrey A. Gray (2004). Consciousness: Creeping Up on the Hard Problem. Oxford University Press.
    This important new book analyses these core issues and reviews the evidence from both introspection and experiment.
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