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  1. Bernard J. Baars & Katharine McGovern (1993). Does Philosophy Help or Hinder Scientific Work on Consciousness? Consciousness and Cognition 2 (1):18-27.
  2. William P. Banks (1995). Evidence for Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):270-272.
  3. William P. Banks (1995). Implicit Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (4):369-370.
  4. Gary Bartlett (2012). The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):451 - 455.
    Philosophical Psychology, Volume 25, Issue 3, Page 451-455, June 2012.
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  5. Imants Baruss (2008). Beliefs About Consciousness and Reality: Clarification of the Confusion Concerning Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):277-292.
    There is considerable confusion surrounding the notion of consciousness. This confusion can be partially resolved by clarifying the referents of the word 'consciousness'. Doing so, however, reveals a more insidious problem, namely, the role played by personal beliefs in understanding consciousness. In particular, as revealed by a comprehensive survey, such beliefs range along a material- transcendent dimension, with the choice of notions of consciousness corresponding to materialist, conservatively transcendent, or extraordinarily transcendent positions. Further empirical research has revealed that those with (...)
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  6. Christina Behme (2011). Language Universals. Philosophical Psychology 24 (6):867-871.
    Philosophical Psychology, Volume 0, Issue 0, Page 1-5, Ahead of Print.
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  7. John Beloff (1989). The Rhine Legacy. Philosophical Psychology 2 (2):231-239.
    Abstract An attempt is made to examine the main principles that underlay the ?Rhinean? school of parapsychology. Five such principles are discussed: (1) that psi can best be assessed using quantitative measures and forced?choice tests; (2) that psi is a function of the unconscious with the implication that objective performance alone is important, not the state of mind of the subject; (3) that psi ability is, to some degree, present in everyone; (4) that only those problems deserve attention for which (...)
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  8. Oana Benga (2006). Heterogeneity in Fluid Cognition and Some Neural Underpinnings. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):126-126.
    In agreement with Blair, I favor the idea of dissociative patterns in cognitive performance, even more when it comes to development. However, such dissociations are present not only between fluid cognition and general intelligence, but also within fluid cognition itself. Heterogeneity of executive attention, even when indexed with a single paradigm, is further discussed in relation to anterior cingulate cortex. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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  9. John Bickle (2002). Editor's Note: State of the Science Article. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (3):381-381.
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  10. David K. Bilkey (1999). Perirhinal Cortex: Lost in Space? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):444-445.
    Aggleton & Brown argue that the function of the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex can be dissociated along a spatial/nonspatial dimension. They further suggest that this division corresponds to a distinction between episodic and recognition memory. An analysis of the data, however, fails to support the underlying dissociation.
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  11. Elizabeth Ligon Bjork & Robert A. Bjork (1996). Continuing Influences of To-Be-Forgotten Information. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):176-196.
    In the present paper, we first argue that it is critical for humans to forget; that is, to have some means of preventing out-of-date information from interfering with the recall of current information. We then argue that the primary means of accomplishing such adaptive updating of human memory is retrieval inhibition: Information that is rendered out of date by new learning becomes less retrievable, but remains at essentially full strength in memory as indexed by other measures, such as recognition and (...)
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  12. Randolph Blake (2012). Binocular Rivalry and Stereopsis Revisited. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press.
  13. Johan J. Bolhuis (1997). Learning, Development, and Synaptic Plasticity: The Avian Connection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):559-560.
    Quartz & Sejnowski's target article concentrates on the development of a number of neural parameters, especially neuronal processes, in the mammalian brain. Data on learning-related changes in spines and synapses in the developing avian brain are consistent with a constructivist interpretation. The issue of an integration of selectionist and constructivist views is discussed.
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  14. A. E. Bonebakker, M. Jelicic, J. Passchier & B. Bonke (1996). Memory During General Anesthesia: Practical and Methodological Aspects. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (4):542-561.
    Evidence coming from several studies into memory and awareness during general anesthesia suggests that in surgical patients who seem to be adequately anesthetized , some form of cognitive functioning is preserved. This finding has important implications both for clinical practice and for memory research. In order to give the methodological background of the present situation in this field of research, this article deals, on the basis of recent experiments, with important methodological aspects of studies into perception and memory during general (...)
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  15. Robert F. Bornstein (2002). Consciousness Organizes More Than Itself: Findings From Subliminal Mere Exposure Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):332-333.
    Contrary to Perruchet & Vinter's self-organizing consciousness (SOC) model, subliminal mere exposure (SME) research indicates that stimuli perceived without awareness produce robust effects. Moreover, SME effects are significantly stronger than mere exposure effects produced by clearly recognized stimuli. The SOC model must be revised to accommodate findings from studies that use affect-based outcome measures.
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  16. Cameron Buckner (2012). The Ego Tunnel: The Science of Mind and the Myth of the Self. Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):457-461.
    Philosophical Psychology, Volume 0, Issue 0, Page 1-5, Ahead of Print.
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  17. Trigant Burrow (1927). The Social Basis of Consciousness. New York, Harcourt, Brace & Co., Inc..
    Acknowledg ment is made to the Editors for permission to include these papers in the present volume. FRINTFD IN l.
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  18. Peter Cariani (1997). Consciousness and the Organization of Neural Processes: Commentary on John Et Al. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (1):56-64.
  19. Peter Carruthers (2009). Banishing" I" and" We" From Accounts of Metacognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):148.
    SHORT ABSTRACT: A number of accounts of the relationship between third-person mindreading and first-person metacognition are compared and evaluated. While three of these accounts endorse the existence of introspection for propositional attitudes, the fourth (defended here) claims that our knowledge of our own attitudes results from turning our mindreading capacities upon ourselves. The different types of theory are developed and evaluated, and multiple lines of evidence are reviewed, including evolutionary and comparative data, evidence of confabulation when self-attributing attitudes, phenomenological evidence (...)
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  20. Peter Carruthers (2009). Mindreading Underlies Metacognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):164-182.
    This response defends the view that human metacognition results from us turning our mindreading capacities upon ourselves, and that our access to our own propositional attitudes is through interpretation rather than introspection. Relevant evidence is considered, including that deriving from studies of childhood development and other animal species. Also discussed are data suggesting dissociations between metacognitive and mindreading capacities, especially in autism and schizophrenia.
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  21. Bradford H. Challis, Boris M. Velichkovsky & Fergus I. M. Craik (1996). Levels-of-Processing Effects on a Variety of Memory Tasks: New Findings and Theoretical Implications. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):142-164.
    Three experiments investigated level of processing effects on a variety of direct and indirect memory tasks, in the context of a processing theory of dissociations. Subjects studied words in five encoding conditions and received one of ten memory tests. In Experiment 1, four tests previously classified as conceptual showed a robust LOP effect, as did a direct perceptual test of graphemic cued recall. An indirect perceptual word fragment completion test was unaffected by LOP. Experiment 2 showed that a new indirect (...)
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  22. C. -Y. Peter Chiu & Daniel L. Schacter (1995). Auditory Priming for Nonverbal Information: Implicit and Explicit Memory for Environmental Sounds. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (4):440-458.
    Three experiments examined repetition priming for meaningful environmental sounds in a sound stem identification paradigm using brief sound cues. Prior encoding of target sounds together with their associated names facilitated subsequent identification of sound stems relative to nonstudied controls. In contrast, prior exposure to names alone in the absence of the environmental sounds did not prime subsequent sound stem identification performance at all . Explicit and implicit memory were dissociated such that sound stem cued recall was higher following semantic than (...)
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  23. I.-han Chou & Peter H. Schiller (1999). Temporal Delays, Not Underactivation of Detection Processes May Be Responsible for Neglect. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):675-676.
    We have shown that FEF lesion-induced extinction could be compensated for by changing the relative temporal onsets of two targets presented on either side of the midline. Monkeys were trained to make saccades to either of two identical visual stimuli presented with various stimulus onset asynchronies (SOA). In intact animals the targets were chosen with equal probability when they appeared simultaneously. After unilateral FEF lesions an SOA of 67–116 msec had to be introduced, with the contralesional target appearing first, to (...)
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  24. Yann Coello & Yves Rossetti (2004). Planning and Controlling Action in a Structured Environment: Visual Illusion Without Dorsal Stream. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):29-31.
    Some data concerning visual illusions are hardly compatible with the perception–action model, assuming that only the perception system is influenced by visual context. The planning–control dichotomy offers an alternative that better accounts for some controversy in experimental data. We tested the two models by submitting the patient I. G. to the induced Roelofs effect. The similitude of the results of I. G. and control subjects favoured Glover's model, which, however, presents a paradox that needs to be clarified.
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  25. John Collins (2011). Innateness, Canalization, and the Modality-Independence of Language: A Reply to Griffiths and Machery. Philosophical Psychology 24 (2):195-206.
    Griffiths and Machery (2008) argue that innateness is a ?folk biological? notion, which, as such, has no useful reconstruction in contemporary biology. If this is so, not only is it wrong to identify the vernacular notion with the precise theoretical concept of canalization, but worse, it would appear that many of the putative scientific claims for particular competences and capacities being innate are simply misplaced. The present paper challenges the core substantive claim of Griffiths and Machery's position, namely, that innateness (...)
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  26. Allan Combs & S. Kripner (2008). Collective Consciousness and the Social Brain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):264-276.
    This paper discusses supportive neurological and social evidence for 'collective consciousness', here understood as a shared sense of being together with others in a single or unified experience. Mirror neurons in the premotor and posterior parietal cortices respond to the intentions as well as the actions of other individuals. There are also mirror neurons in the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortices which have been implicated in empathy. Many authors have considered the likely role of such mirror systems in the (...)
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  27. Anthony Dardis (1993). Comment on Searle: Philosophy and the Empirical Study of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (4):320-333.
    I make three points about Searle’s philosophical work on consciousness and intentionality. First, I comment on Searle’s presentation and paper “The Problems of Consciousness.” I show that one of Searle’s philosophical claims about the relation between consciousness and intentionality appears to conflict with a demand he makes on acceptable empirical theories of the brain. Second, I argue that closer attention to the difference between conceptual connections and empirical connections corrects and improves Searle’s response to the so-called “Logical Connections” argument, the (...)
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  28. Leon de Bruin & Lena Kästner (2012). Dynamic Embodied Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):541-563.
    Abstract In this article, we investigate the merits of an enactive view of cognition for the contemporary debate about social cognition. If enactivism is to be a genuine alternative to classic cognitivism, it should be able to bridge the “cognitive gap”, i.e. provide us with a convincing account of those higher forms of cognition that have traditionally been the focus of its cognitivist opponents. We show that, when it comes to social cognition, current articulations of enactivism are—despite their celebrated successes (...)
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  29. Frédérique de Vignemont (2009). Drawing the Boundary Between Low-Level and High-Level Mindreading. Philosophical Studies 144 (3):457 - 466.
    The philosophical world is indebted to Alvin Goldman for a number of reasons, and among them, his defense of the relevance of cognitive science for philosophy of mind. In Simulating minds , Goldman discusses with great care and subtlety a wide variety of experimental results related to mindreading from cognitive neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology and developmental psychology. No philosopher has done more to display the resourcefulness of mental simulation. I am sympathetic with much of the general direction of Goldman’s (...)
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  30. Bill Faw (2005). Consciousness Science is Alive and Well in Global Psychology: Report From ICP-2004 in Beijing, Aug 8-13, 2004 International Psychology. [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (2):71-77.
    The International Union of Psychological Science ('Union') co-hosted, with the Chinese Psychological Society its 28th International Congress of Psychology ('Congress'). The first Congress was held with the World's Fair in Paris in 1889. In recent decades, they have been held every four years in different parts of the world. The Union has member organizations from 67 nations, representing one half million psychologists. Pretty scary stuff!
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  31. Maria Isabel Aldinhas Ferreira & Miguel Gama Caldas (2013). Modelling Artificial Cognition in Biosemiotic Terms. Biosemiotics 6 (2):245-252.
    Stemming from Uexkull’s fundamental concepts of Umwelt and Innenwelt as developed in the biosemiotic approach of Ferreira 2010, 2011, the present work models mathematically the semiosis of cognition and proposes an artificial cognitive architecture to be deployed in a robotic structure.
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  32. Robert Kc Forman (2010). A Conference and a Question1. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (5-6):183-88.
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  33. Alvin I. Goldman, Mirroring, Mindreading, and Simulation.
    What is the connection between mirror processes and mindreading? The paper begins with definitions of mindreading and of mirroring processes. It then advances four theses: (T1) mirroring processes in themselves do not constitute mindreading; (T2) some types of mindreading (“low-level” mindreading) are based on mirroring processes; (T3) not all types of mindreading are based on mirroring (“high-level” mindreading); and (T4) simulation-based mindreading includes but is broader than mirroring-based mindreading. Evidence for the causal role of mirroring in mindreading is drawn from (...)
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  34. Patricia M. Greenfield (2001). Author's Response. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):153-154.
    Ronan Reilly's connectionist simulation both strengthens and advances the theoretical model presented in my 1991 target article, “Language, Tools, and Brain: The Ontogeny and Phylogeny of Hierarchically Organized Sequential Behavior.” Reilly has tested the whole ontogenetic model with a single simulation study explicitly planned for this purpose. His methodology has established that the various components of the theoretical model imply and are compatible with one another. It has also indicated how learning can actualize a pre-established ontogenetic sequence of combining lingusitic (...)
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  35. S. Hameroff, A. Kaszniak & David Chalmers (eds.) (1999). Toward a Science of Consciousness III: The Third Tucson Discussions and Debates. MIT Press.
    The first two conferences and books have become touchstones for the field. This volume presents a selection of invited papers from the third conference.
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  36. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (1996). Ways of Knowing. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (3):359-367.
  37. Dave Hawkey (unknown). Postgraduate Conference 2005. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3).
  38. Katharina Henke, Theodor Landis & Hans J. Markowitsch (1993). Subliminal Perception of Pictures in the Right Hemisphere. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (3):225-236.
    We addressed the questions whether stimuli presented below the threshold of verbal awareness are nevertheless perceived and whether there are perceptual differences between the two cerebral hemispheres. Pictures of line drawn objects and animals were subliminally presented to each visual half-field for subsequent identification in a form as fragmented as possible. The performance of 40 healthy subjects was compared to that of 63 controls. Whereas identification performance after blank presentation in the experimental group did not differ from that of controls, (...)
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  39. Steven A. Hillyard (1997). Commentary on Article by John, Easton, and Isenhart. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (1):50-55.
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  40. Jean Khalfa (2001). Comments on John Horgan's the Undiscovered Mind. Brain and Mind 2 (2):249-252.
  41. William G. Lycan (1989). Reply to Lakoff. Philosophical Psychology 2 (1):77 – 84.
  42. William G. Lycan (1989). Reply to McCarthy. Philosophical Psychology 2 (1):51 – 53.
  43. J.& Proust M., J., J., J., Beran, Brandl, Perner (ed.) (2012). The Foundations of Metacognition. Oxford University Press.
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  44. Riccardo Manzotti & Paolo Moderato, Riccardo Manzotti, Paolo Moderato.
    The widespread use of brain imaging techniques encourages conceiving of neuroscience as the forthcoming “mindscience.” Perhaps surprisingly for many, this conclusion is still largely unwarranted. The present paper surveys various shortcomings of neuroscience as a putative “mindscience.” The analysis shows that the scope of mind (both cognitive and phenomenal) falls outside that of neuroscience. Of course, such a conclusion does not endorse any metaphysical or antiscientific stance as to the nature of the mind. Rather, it challenges a series of assumptions (...)
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  45. Paul E. Meehl (1978). Precognitive Telepathy I: On the Possibility of Distinguishing It Experimentally From Psychokinesis. Noûs 12 (3):235-266.
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  46. Angela Mendelovici (2013). Review of Tim Bayne's The Unity of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 26 (1):158-162.
  47. Michele Merritt (2015). Thinking-is-Moving: Dance, Agency, and a Radically Enactive Mind. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):95-110.
    Recently, in cognitive science, the enactivist account of cognition has been gaining ground, due in part to studies of movement in conjunction with thought. The idea, as Noë , has put it, that “cognition is not something happening inside us or to us, but it’s something we do, something we achieve,” is increasingly supported by research on joint attention, movement coordination, and gesture. Not surprisingly, therefore, enactivists have also begun to look at “movement specialists”—dancers—for both scientific and phenomenological accounts of (...)
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  48. Dennis Norris, James M. McQueen & Anne Cutler (2000). Merging Information in Speech Recognition: Feedback is Never Necessary. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):299-325.
    Top-down feedback does not benefit speech recognition; on the contrary, it can hinder it. No experimental data imply that feedback loops are required for speech recognition. Feedback is accordingly unnecessary and spoken word recognition is modular. To defend this thesis, we analyse lexical involvement in phonemic decision making. TRACE (McClelland & Elman 1986), a model with feedback from the lexicon to prelexical processes, is unable to account for all the available data on phonemic decision making. The modular Race model (Cutler (...)
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  49. Fotini Pallikari (2003). Must the'Magic'of Psychokinesis Hinder Precise Scientific Measurement? Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (6-7):6-7.
    Although evidential reports of paranormal phenomena have been accumulating over the last 50 years, scepticism within the scientific community at large against the very existence of psi has not retreated in proportion. Strong criticism has been voiced and it is worth taking it under serious consideration while attempting to understand psi. This article reviews the micro- psychokinesis phenomenon, aiming to reconcile evidence that favours it with other evidence that seems to refute it. To achieve this challenging task, some seemingly irrelevant (...)
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  50. David Pritchett, Alberto Gallace & Charles Spence (2011). Implicit Processing of Tactile Information: Evidence From the Tactile Change Detection Paradigm. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):534-546.
    People can maintain accurate representations of visual changes without necessarily being aware of them. Here, we investigate whether a similar phenomenon also exists in touch. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants detected the presence of a change between two consecutively-presented tactile displays. Tactile change blindness was observed, with participants failing to report the presence of tactile change. Critically, however, when participants had to make a forced choice response regarding the number of stimuli presented in the two displays, their performance was (...)
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