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  1. Malcolm Acock (1985). Vision: A Computational Investigation Into the Human Representation and Processing of Visual Information. By David Marr. Modern Schoolman 62 (2):141-142.
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  2. E. Q. Adams & P. W. Cobb (1922). The Effect on Foveal Vision of Bright (and Dark) Surroundings. V. Journal of Experimental Psychology 5 (1):39.
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  3. K. Albus (1985). A Microelectrode Study of the Spatial Arrangement of Iso-Orientation Bands in the Cat's Striate Cortex. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons. 485--491.
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  4. Hartley B. Alexander (1914). The Perception of Motion. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 11 (11):281-290.
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  5. L. T. Alexander & A. S. Cooperband (1966). Visual Detection of Compound Motion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (6):816.
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  6. Britt Anderson & David L. Sheinberg (2010). Neurophysiology of Temporal Orienting in Ventral Visual Stream. In Anna C. Nobre & Jennifer T. Coull (eds.), Attention and Time. Oup Oxford. 407.
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  7. Ronald W. Angel, Harry Garland & Martin Fischler (1971). Tracking Errors Amended Without Visual Feedback. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (2):422.
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  8. Mark Augath, fMRI Measurements of Color in Macaque and Human.
    We have used fMRI to measure responses to chromatic and achromatic contrast in retinotopically defined regions of macaque and human visual cortex. We make four observations. Firstly, the relative amplitudes of responses to color and luminance stimuli in macaque area V1 are similar to those previously observed in human fMRI experiments. Secondly, the dorsal and ventral subdivisions of macaque area V4 respond in a similar way to opponent (L j M)-cone chromatic contrast suggesting that they are part of a single (...)
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  9. Sunny Auyang, What Do You See, and How? The Cognitive Infrastructure of Vision.
    Seeing a rose or hearing the doorbell is among the most common and immediate of experiences. Sense perceptions are also most fundamental and important; on them base all our factual knowledge and empirical science. Does their epistemological priority stem from their being unanalyzable primitives given to us? Do they have structures? If so, what are the structures and where do they come from? The importance of these questions extends beyond psychology to the justification of all knowledge and science.
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  10. Leonardo Badino, Alessandro D'Ausilio, Luciano Fadiga & Giorgio Metta (2014). Computational Validation of the Motor Contribution to Speech Perception. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):461-475.
    Action perception and recognition are core abilities fundamental for human social interaction. A parieto-frontal network (the mirror neuron system) matches visually presented biological motion information onto observers' motor representations. This process of matching the actions of others onto our own sensorimotor repertoire is thought to be important for action recognition, providing a non-mediated “motor perception” based on a bidirectional flow of information along the mirror parieto-frontal circuits. State-of-the-art machine learning strategies for hand action identification have shown better performances when sensorimotor (...)
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  11. J. F. Bales & G. L. Follansbee (1935). The After-Effect of the Perception of Curved Lines. Journal of Experimental Psychology 18 (4):499.
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  12. S. H. Bartley (1940). The Relation Between Cortical Response to Visual Stimulation and Changes in the Alpha Rhythm. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):624.
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  13. Aaron Ben-Zeev (1981). J.J. Gibson and the Ecological Approach to Perception. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 12 (2):107-139.
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  14. Patrick J. Bennett (2002). Vision: Early Psychological Processes. In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
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  15. Ryad Benosman (2010). Vision Without Frames: A Semiotic Paradigm of Event Based Computer Vision. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (1):1-16.
    Conventional imagers and almost all vision processes use and rely on theories that are based on the principle of static image-frames. A frame is a 2D matrix that represents the spatial locations of intensities of a scene projected on the imager. The notion of a frame itself is so embedded in machine vision, that it is usually taken for granted that this is how biological systems store light information. This paper presents a biosinpired event-based image formation principle, which output data (...)
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  16. Stephen Biggs, Mohan Matthen & Dustin Stokes (2014). Sorting the Senses. In Dustin Stokes, Mohan Matthen & Stephen Biggs (eds.), Perception and its Modalities. Oxford University Press. 1-19.
    We perceive in many ways. But several dubious presuppositions about the senses mask this diversity of perception. Philosophers, scientists, and engineers alike too often presuppose that the senses (vision, audition, etc.) are independent sources of information, perception being a sum of these independent contributions. We too often presuppose that we can generalize from vision to other senses. We too often presuppose that vision itself is best understood as a passive receptacle for an image thrown by a lens. In this essay (...)
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  17. M. E. Bitterman (1945). Heart Rate and Frequency of Blinking as Indices of Visual Efficiency. Journal of Experimental Psychology 35 (4):279.
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  18. Howard T. Blane (1962). Space Perception Among Unilaterally Paralyzed Children and Adolescents. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (3):244.
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  19. David A. Leopold & Bondar & Igor (2005). Adaptation to Complex Visual Patterns in Humans and Monkeys. In Colin W. G. Clifford & Gillian Rhodes (eds.), Fitting the Mind to the World: Adaptation and After-Effects in High-Level Vision. Oup Oxford.
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  20. Claude Bonnet, Jorge Gurlekian & Paula Harris (1992). Reaction Time and Visual Area: Searching for the Determinants. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (5):396-398.
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  21. D. C. Bradley (2001). Motion Perception: Psychological and Neural Aspects. In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. 10099--10105.
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  22. Justin Broackes (2011). Where Do the Unique Hues Come From? Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (4):601-628.
    Where are we to look for the unique hues? Out in the world? In the eye? In more central processing? 1. There are difficulties looking for the structure of the unique hues in simple combinations of cone-response functions like ( L − M ) and ( S − ( L + M )): such functions may fit pretty well the early physiological processing, but they don’t correspond to the structure of unique hues. It may seem more promising to look to, (...)
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  23. Carl R. Brown & J. W. Gebhard (1948). Visual Field Articulation in the Absence of Spatial Stimulus Gradients. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (2):188.
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  24. Thomas Busey, Chen Yu, Dean Wyatte & John Vanderkolk (2013). Temporal Sequences Quantify the Contributions of Individual Fixations in Complex Perceptual Matching Tasks. Cognitive Science 37 (4):731-756.
    Perceptual tasks such as object matching, mammogram interpretation, mental rotation, and satellite imagery change detection often require the assignment of correspondences to fuse information across views. We apply techniques developed for machine translation to the gaze data recorded from a complex perceptual matching task modeled after fingerprint examinations. The gaze data provide temporal sequences that the machine translation algorithm uses to estimate the subjects' assumptions of corresponding regions. Our results show that experts and novices have similar surface behavior, such as (...)
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  25. Robert A. Butler (1954). Incentive Conditions Which Influence Visual Exploration. Journal of Experimental Psychology 48 (1):19.
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  26. Clotilde Calabi (2009). Filosofia Della Percezione. Laterza.
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  27. V. R. Carlson (1959). Aftereffect of a Moving Pattern. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (1):31.
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  28. H. Carr (1921). The Influence of Visual Guidance in Maze Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 4 (6):399.
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  29. Paul G. Cheatham (1952). Visual Perceptual Latency as a Function of Stimulus Brightness and Contour Shape. Journal of Experimental Psychology 43 (5):369.
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  30. Patricia Smith Churchland (1982). Is the Visual System as Smart as It Looks? PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:541 - 552.
    Irvin Rock's hypothesis that certain stages of perceptual processing resemble problem solving in cognition is contrasted to some recent work in computer vision (Marr, Ullman) which tries to reduce intelligence in perception to computational organization. The focal example is subjective contours which Marr thought could be handled by computational modules without descending control, and which Rock thinks are the outcome of intelligent processing.
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  31. David E. Cooper (2009). Filling the Whole. The Philosophers' Magazine 45 (45):83-83.
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  32. David E. Cooper (2009). Filling the Whole. The Philosophers' Magazine 45 (45):83-83.
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  33. Alan Costall & Arthur Still (1989). Gibson's Theory of Direct Perception and the Problem of Cultural Relativism. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 19 (4):433–441.
  34. M. R. D'Amato, D. P. Salmon & M. Puopolo (1981). Long-Delay Visual Discrimination Learning in Monkeys (Cebus Apella). Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (2):89-91.
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  35. N. K. Logothetis D. A. Leopold (1999). Multistable Phenomena: Changing Views in Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3:254-264.
    Traditional explanations of multistable visual phenomena (e.g. ambiguous figures, perceptual rivalry) suggest that the basis for spontaneous reversals in perception lies in antagonistic connectivity within the visual system. In this review, we suggest an alternative, albeit speculative. explanation for visual multistability - that spontaneous alternations reflect responses to active, programmed events initiated by brain areas that integrate sensory and non-sensory information to coordinate a diversity of behaviors. Much evidence suggests that perceptual reversals are themselves more closely related to the expression (...)
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  36. Dennis Dacey (2004). 20 Origins of Perception: Retinal Ganglion Cell Diversity and the Creation of Parallel Visual Pathways. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. Mit Press. 281.
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  37. R. H. Day & G. Singer (1964). Spatial Aftereffects Within and Between Kinesthesis and Vision. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (4):337.
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  38. J. J. de Lucio-Meyer (1973). Visual Aesthetics.
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  39. Maria Lúcia B. De Simas & José Aparecido Da Silva (1989). Brazilian Studies on Visual Psychophysics and Neurophysiology. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (3):249-252.
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  40. L. Deouell (2002). Pre-Requisites for Conscious Awareness: Clues From Electrophysiological and Behavioral Studies of Unilateral Neglect Patients. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):546-567.
    Encoding sensory events entails processing of several physical attributes. Is the processing of any of these attributes a pre-requisite of conscious awareness? This selective review examines a recent set of behavioral and event-related potentials, studies conducted in patients with visual and auditory unilateral neglect or extinction, with the aim of establishing what aspects of initial processing are impaired in these patients. These studies suggest that extinguished visual stimuli excite the sensory cortices, but perhaps to a lesser degree than acknowledged stimuli (...)
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  41. Tony Dickinson (2003). Looking and Seeing with the Mind’s I, and its Brain A Review of Visual Attention and Cortical Circuits by Braun, J., Koch, C. And Davis, J.L. [REVIEW] Psyche 9.
    Contributions to this edited volume argue for the existence of top-down, context- and task-dependant modulating mechanisms of attention occurring in the mammalian brain. Such positions support the view that areas of the brain traditionally thought to be involved in relatively 'late' stages of visual processing activity can, and do affect the response properties of 'early' visual processing neurons, including primary visual cortex . Neural circuitries concerned with the processing of visual information should now be viewed less as involving unidirectional mappings (...)
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  42. Ian Dove & Marcello Guarini, Visual Analogies and Arguments.
    I argue that a basic similarity analysis of analogical reasoning handles many apparent cases of visual analogy. I consider how the visual and verbal elements interact in analogical cases. Finally, I offer two analyses of visual elements. One analysis is evidential. The visual elements are evidence for their ver-bal counterparts. One is non-evidential: the visual elements link to verbal elements without providing evi-dence for those elements. The result is to make more room for the logical analysis of visual argumentation.
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  43. Robert G. Eason (1981). Visual Evoked Potential Correlates of Early Neural Filtering During Selective Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (4):203-206.
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  44. Andreas K. Engel (2003). Time and Conscious Visual Processing. In Hede Helfrich (ed.), Time and Mind II: Information Processing Perspectives. Hogrefe & Huber Publishers. 141-159.
  45. R. Fabian (ed.) (1986). Christian von Ehrenfels: Leben und Werk. Rodopi.
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  46. Paul M. Fitts, Meyer Weinstein, Maurice Rappaport, Nancy Anderson & J. Alfred Leonard (1956). Stimulus Correlates of Visual Pattern Recognition: A Probability Approach. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (1):1.
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  47. Risieri Frondizi (1950). On the Nature of the Self. Review of Metaphysics 3 (June):437-452.
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  48. Maxwell Garnett (1943). Gestalt Psychology. Philosophy 18 (69):37 - 49.
    The aim of psychology is first of all to describe how we think, or the flow of our consciousness, and then to sum up the facts in terms of principles, generalizations, or “laws” which “govern” our thinking. These laws must enable us to foretell what a man will think and how he will act when we know his environment and the state of his thought at any given moment, provided that no unforeseeable exercise of free will intervenes. Psychology has also (...)
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  49. M. M. Gassel (1969). Occipital Lobe Syndromes (Excluding Hemianopia). In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland. 2--700.
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  50. W. Geisler & D. Albrecht (2000). Spatial Vision. In K. K. De Valois (ed.), Seeing. Academic Press. 79--128.
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