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  1. Joseph Agassi (1988). The Future of Big Science. Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (1):17-26.
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  2. Joseph Agassi (1986). The Politics of Science. Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (1):35-48.
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  3. M. Alfino (1996). Research Crimes, Misdemeanors, and Tolerated Deceptions. Journal of Information Ethics 5 (1):5-8.
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  4. Brian Allen (2009). Are Researchers Ethically Obligated to Report Suspected Child Maltreatment? A Critical Analysis of Opposing Perspectives. Ethics and Behavior 19 (1):15 – 24.
    A number of authors have commented on the topic of mandated reporting in cases of suspected child maltreatment and the application of this requirement to researchers. Most of these commentaries focus on the interpretation of current legal standards and offer opinions for or against the imposition of mandated reporting laws on research activities. Authors on both sides of the issue offer ethical arguments, although a direct comparison and analysis of these opposing arguments is rare. This article critically examines the ethical (...)
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  5. Jennifer Alvidrez & Patricia A. Areán (2002). Psychosocial Treatment Research with Ethnic Minority Populations: Ethical Considerations in Conducting Clinical Trials. Ethics and Behavior 12 (1):103 – 116.
    Because of historical mistreatment of ethnic minorities by research and medical institutions, it is particularly important for researchers to be mindful of ethical issues that arise when conducting research with ethnic minority populations. In this article, we focus on the ethical issues related to the inclusion of ethnic minorities in clinical trials of psychosocial treatments. We highlight 2 factors, skepticism and mistrust by ethnic minorities about research and current inequities in the mental health care system, that researchers should consider when (...)
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  6. Hanne Andersen, Demarcating Misconduct From Misinterpretations and Mistakes.
    Within recent years, scientific misconduct has become an increasingly important topic, not only in the scientific community, but in the general public as well. Spectacular cases have been extensively covered in the news media, such as the cases of the Korean stem cell researcher Hwang, the German nanoscientist Schön, or the Norwegian cancer researcher Sudbø. In Science's latest annual "breakthrough of the year" report from December 2006, the descriptions of the year's hottest breakthroughs were accompanied by a similar description of (...)
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  7. J. Anderson (1996). Digital Imaging: A Reaffirmation of Integrity in Research. Journal of Information Ethics 5 (1):52-58.
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  8. J. Anderson (1994). Fraud in Research, 1986-1992: An Annotated Bibliography. Journal of Information Ethics 3 (2):64.
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  9. Carusi Annamaria & De Grandis Giovanni (2012). The Ethical Work That Regulations Will Not Do. Information, Communication and Society 15 (1):124-141.
    Ethical concerns in e-social science are often raised with respect to privacy, confidentiality, anonymity and the ethical and legal requirements that govern research. In this article, the authors focus on ethical aspects of e-research that are not directly related to ethical regulatory framework or requirements. These frameworks are often couched in terms of benefits or harms that can be incurred by participants in the research. The authors shift the focus to the sources of value in terms of which benefits or (...)
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  10. Mark H. Ashcraft & Jeremy A. Krause (2007). Social and Behavioral Researchers' Experiences with Their Irbs. Ethics and Behavior 17 (1):1 – 17.
    A national survey on researchers’ experiences with their institutional review boards (IRBs) is presented, focused exclusively on social and behavioral researchers. A wide range of experiences is apparent in the data, especially in terms of turnaround time for submitted protocols, incidence of data collection without prior IRB approval, and stated reasons for "going solo." Sixty-two percent felt that the turnaround time they typically experience is "reasonable," and 44% said they had not experienced long delays in obtaining approval. However, 48% of (...)
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  11. Sara Ashencaen Crabtree (2012). Research Ethics and the Moral Enterprise of Ethnography: Conjunctions and Contradictions. Ethics and Social Welfare (4):1-20.
    This paper explores the perceptions and experiences of four doctoral researchers to examine how research ethics committee (REC) processes have shaped and influenced specific health-based ethnographic studies. This paper considers how a universal tightening of ethical REC scrutiny at university level, as well as those governing the health and social care sector in the United Kingdom, impacts upon social research involving the inclusion of participants from certain groups. Increased restrictions in ethics scrutiny is justified as protecting vulnerable people from intrusive (...)
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  12. Julie Aultman (2013). Dissolution of ESCROs and Evolution of a National Ethics Committee for Scientific Advancement. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):61-62.
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  13. Yatan Balhara (2011). Rights of Authors: Do We Need Guidelines for Editors as Well? [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (3):225-226.
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  14. Karin Bckstrand (2004). Precaution, Scientization or Deliberation? Prospects for Greening and Democratizing Science. In M. L. J. Wissenburg & Yoram Levy (eds.), Liberal Democracy and Environmentalism: The End of Environmentalism? Routledge.
  15. Roger N. Beachy (1991). The Very Structure of Scientific Research Does Not Mitigate Against Developing Products to Help the Environment, the Poor, and the Hungry. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 4 (2):159-165.
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  16. Fabiana Bekerman (2013). The Scientific Field During Argentina's Latest Military Dictatorship (1976–1983): Contraction of Public Universities and Expansion of the National Council for Scientific and Technological Research (CONICET). [REVIEW] Minerva 51 (2):253-269.
    This study looks at some of the traits that characterized Argentina’s scientific and university policies under the military regime that spanned from 1976 through 1983. To this end, it delves into a rarely explored empirical observation: financial resource transfers from national universities to the National Scientific and Technological Research Council (CONICET, for its Spanish acronym) during that period. The intention is to show how, by reallocating funds geared to Science and Technology, CONICET was made to expand and decentralize to the (...)
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  17. Marianne Benard, Huib de Vriend, Paul van Haperen & Volkert Beekman (2010). Science and Society in Dialogue About Marker Assisted Selection. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (4):317-329.
    Analysis of a European Union funded biotechnology project on plant genomics and marker assisted selection in Solanaceous crops shows that the organization of a dialogue between science and society to accompany technological innovations in plant breeding faces practical challenges. Semi-structured interviews with project participants and a survey among representatives of consumer and other non-governmental organizations show that the professed commitment to dialogue on science and biotechnology is rather shallow and has had limited application for all involved. Ultimately, other priorities tend (...)
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  18. Dale Benos & Sara Vollmer (2010). Generalizing on Best Practices in Image Processing: A Model for Promoting Research Integrity. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (4):669-673.
    Modifying images for scientific publication is now quick and easy due to changes in technology. This has created a need for new image processing guidelines and attitudes, such as those offered to the research community by Doug Cromey (Cromey 2010). We suggest that related changes in technology have simplified the task of detecting misconduct for journal editors as well as researchers, and that this simplification has caused a shift in the responsibility for reporting misconduct. We also argue that the concept (...)
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  19. Miriam Bentwich (2012). It's About Scientific Secrecy, Dummy: A Better Equilibrium Among Genomics Patenting, Scientific Research and Health Care. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):263-284.
    This paper offers a different pragmatic and patent-based approach to concerns regarding the negative effects of genetic-based patenting on advancing scientific research and providing adequate and accessible health care services. At the basis of this approach lies an explication of a mandatory provisional patented paper procedure (PPPA), designed for genetic-based patents and administered by leading scientific journals in the field, while officially acknowledged by the USPTO, and subsequently by other patent offices as well. It is argued that the uniqueness of (...)
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  20. Louise Bezuidenhout (2013). Data Sharing and Dual-Use Issues. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):83-92.
    The concept of dual-use encapsulates the potential for well-intentioned, beneficial scientific research to also be misused by a third party for malicious ends. The concept of dual-use challenges scientists to look beyond the immediate outcomes of their research and to develop an awareness of possible future (mis)uses of scientific research. Since 2001 much attention has been paid to the possible need to regulate the dual-use potential of the life sciences. Regulation initiatives fall under two broad categories—those that develop the ethical (...)
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  21. Stephanie Bird (2010). Responsible Research: What is Expected? Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (4):693-696.
    Responsible research and good science are concepts with various meanings depending on one’s perspective and assumptions. Fellow researchers, research participants, policy makers and the general public also have differing expectations of the benefits of research ranging from accurate and reliable data that extend the body of knowledge, to solutions to societal concerns. Unless these differing constituencies articulate their differing views they may fail to communicate and undermine the value of research to society.
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  22. Arthur Bonito, Sandra Titus & David Wright (2012). Assessing the Preparedness of Research Integrity Officers (RIOs) to Appropriately Handle Possible Research Misconduct Cases. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (4):605-619.
    Institutions receiving federal funding for research from the U.S.Public Health Service need to have policies and procedures to both prevent research misconduct and to adjudicate it when it occurs. The person who is designated to handle research misconduct is typically referred to as the research integrity officer (RIO). In this interview study we report on 79 RIOs who describe how they would handle allegations of research misconduct. Their responses were compared to two expert RIOs. The responses to the allegations in (...)
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  23. L. Bornmann, R. Mutz, C. Neuhaus & HD Daniel (2008). Citation Counts for Research Evaluation: Standards of Good Practice for Analyzing Bibliometric Data and Presenting and Interpreting Results. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 8 (1):93-102.
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  24. Tomislav Bracanovic (2002). The Referee's Dilemma. The Ethics of Scientific Communities and Game Theory. Prolegomena 1 (1):55-74.
    This article argues that various deviations from the basic principles of the scientific ethos – primarily the appearance of pseudoscience in scientific communities – can be formulated and explained using specific models of game theory, such as the prisoner’s dilemma and the iterated prisoner’s dilemma. The article indirectly tackles the deontology of scientific work as well, in which it is assumed that there is no room for moral skepticism, let alone moral anti-realism, in the ethics of scientific communities. Namely, on (...)
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  25. Adam Briggle (2012). Ethics and Science: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; 1. Introduction and overview; 2. Ethical concepts and theories; 3. Science and its norms; 4. Research ethics I: misconduct and the responsible conduct of research; 5. Research ethics II: science involving humans; 6. Research ethics III: science involving animals; 7. The science of ethics; 8. Transition: from ethics to politics and policy; 9. Science and politics I: policy for science; 10. Science and politics II: science for policy; 11. Science and ideational culture; 12. Science applied: (...)
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  26. Mindaugas Broga, Goran Mijaljica, Marcin Waligora, Aime Keis & Ana Marusic (2013). Publication Ethics in Biomedical Journals From Countries in Central and Eastern Europe. Science and Engineering Ethics (1):1-11.
    Publication ethics is an important aspect of both the research and publication enterprises. It is particularly important in the field of biomedical science because published data may directly affect human health. In this article, we examine publication ethics policies in biomedical journals published in Central and Eastern Europe. We were interested in possible differences between East European countries that are members of the European Union (Eastern EU) and South-East European countries (South-East Europe) that are not members of the European Union.The (...)
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  27. Jeanne Brooks-Gunn & Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus (1994). Rights to Privacy in Research: Adolescents Versus Parents. Ethics and Behavior 4 (2):109 – 121.
    Conducting research on adolescents raises a number of ethical issues not often confronted in research on younger children. In part, these differences are due to the fact that although assent is usually not an issue, given cognitive and social competencies, the life situations and behavior of youth make it more difficult to balance rights and privacy of the adolescents. In this article, the three ethical principles of beneficence, justice, and respect for persons are discussed in terms of their application to (...)
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  28. Amy L. Brown (2013). Gabriela Soto Laveaga: Jungle Laboratories—Mexican Peasants, National Projects, and the Making of the Pill. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (4):913-915.
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  29. Sarah L. Bunnell & John-Paul Legerski (2011). The Risks, Benefits, and Ethics of Trauma-Focused Research Participation. Ethics and Behavior 20 (6):429-442.
    With the rising interest in the field of trauma research, many Institutional Review Boards, policymakers, parents, and others grapple with the impact of trauma-research participation on research participants' well-being. Do individuals who participate in trauma-focused research risk experiencing lasting negative effects from participation? What are the potential benefits that may be gleaned from participation in this work? How can trauma research studies be designed ethically, minimizing the risk to participants? The following review seeks to answer these questions. This review indicates (...)
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  30. Lisa Cacari-Stone & Magdalena Avila (2012). Rethinking Research Ethics for Latinos: The Policy Paradox of Health Reform and the Role of Social Justice. Ethics and Behavior 22 (6):445-460.
    This article discusses the paradox of exclusion/inclusion: U.S. health policy prohibits Latinos who fall under certain classifications from accessing health services and insurance yet permits them to be ?human subjects? in health research. We aim to advance the discussion of health research ethics post the Tuskegee syphilis experiment in Latinos by (a) tracing the impacts of policy exclusion and the social context of anti-Latino sentiment on Latinos' low participation rates in health research and inequitable access to treatment modalities; (b) challenging (...)
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  31. Kathleen Carter, Sarah Banks, Andrea Armstrong, Sara Kindon & Ingrid Burkett (2013). Issues of Disclosure and Intrusion: Ethical Challenges for a Community Researcher. Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (1):92-100.
    This case study focuses on some of the ethical issues that arise in community-based participatory research, drawing on an example from practice in the UK. It comprises a case example written by a community researcher, followed by two commentaries, which analyse the case and offer different perspectives on the issues raised from the commentators' experiences in Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia. The case example highlights the challenges faced by volunteer action researchers undertaking research interviews and mentoring on sensitive topics in (...)
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  32. L. B. Cebik (1993). A Bill of Rights for Human Subjects of Research. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (1):25-33.
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  33. Don Chalmers (2004). Research Involving Humans: A Time for Change? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):583-595.
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  34. Craig A. Childress & Joy K. Asamen (1998). The Emerging Relationship of Psychology and the Internet: Proposed Guidelines for Conducting Internet Intervention Research. Ethics and Behavior 8 (1):19 – 35.
    The Internet is rapidly developing into an important medium of communication in modem society, and both psychological research and therapeutic interventions are being increasingly conducted using this new communication medium. As therapeutic interventions using the Internet are becoming more prevalent, it is becoming increasingly important to conduct research on psychotherapeutic Internet interventions to assist in the development of an appropriate standard of practice regarding interventions using this new medium. In this article, we examine the Internet and the current psychological uses (...)
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  35. Steve Clarke (1999). Justifying Deception in Social Science Research. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):151–166.
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  36. Henriikka Clarkeburn (2002). A Test for Ethical Sensitivity in Science. Journal of Moral Education 31 (4):439-453.
    The Test for Ethical Sensitivity in Science (TESS) described in this article is a pen-and-paper measure for studying ethical sensitivity development in young adults. It was developed to evaluate the impact of a short ethics discussion course for university science students. TESS requires students to respond to an unstructured story and their responses are scored according to the level of recognition of the ethical issues in the scenario provided. When TESS was used in conjunction with ethics teaching it showed that (...)
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  37. James A. Coan (1997). Lost in a Shopping Mall: An Experience with Controversial Research. Ethics and Behavior 7 (3):271 – 284.
    In the 16th century Bruno asserted that the earth revolves around the sun. This notion violated the Catholic Church's teaching that the earth was the center of the universe, and his suggestion proved he was a heretic. He was promptly burned at the stake. One hundred years later Galileo said the same thing, and provided evidence. He was forced to recant his views, but he gave the world telescopes so that people could learn for themselves. Today, his assertion is held (...)
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  38. James A. Coan (1997). Perspectives: Lost in a Shopping Mall: An Experience with Controversial Research. Ethics and Behavior 7 (3):271 – 284.
    In the 16th century Bruno asserted that the earth revolves around the sun. This notion violated the Catholic Church's teaching that the earth was the center of the universe, and his suggestion proved he was a heretic. He was promptly burned at the stake. One hundred years later Galileo said the same thing, and provided evidence. He was forced to recant his views, but he gave the world telescopes so that people could learn for themselves. Today, his assertion is held (...)
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  39. Perrin S. Cohen (1994). Taking Science to Heart: A Personal Ethic for Responsible Science. Ethics and Behavior 4 (1):59 – 67.
    In this article, I describe the need for tomorrow's scientists to be tutored in a personal ethic that values ethical responsiveness as the core, organizing principle for guiding research, teaching, application, and career direction. To address this need, I describe a teaching approach that instills science students with an understanding that moral reflection and action are the core tenets of scientific thinking and practice. The approach empowers students to reflect openly and discuss ongoing, ethical concerns as they face them in (...)
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  40. Cory A. Crane, Samuel W. Hawes, Dolores Mandel & Caroline J. Easton (2013). Informed Consent: An Ethical Issue in Conducting Research with Male Partner Violent Offenders. Ethics and Behavior 23 (6):477-488.
    Ethical codes help guide the methods of research that involves samples gathered from ?at-risk? populations. The current article reviews general as well as specific ethical principles related to gathering informed consent from partner violent offenders mandated to outpatient treatment, a group that may be at increased risk of unintentional coercion in behavioral sciences research due to court mandates that require outpatient treatment without the ethical protections imbued upon prison populations. Recommendations are advanced to improve the process of informed consent within (...)
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  41. Lisa DeMarni Cromer, Jennifer J. Freyd, Angela K. Binder, Anne P. DePrince & Kathryn Becker-Blease (2006). What's the Risk in Asking? Participant Reaction to Trauma History Questions Compared with Reaction to Other Personal Questions. Ethics and Behavior 16 (4):347 – 362.
    Does asking about trauma history create participant distress? If so, how does it compare with reactions to other personal questions? Do participants consider trauma questions important compared to other personal questions? Using 2 undergraduate samples (Ns = 240 and 277), the authors compared participants' reactions to trauma questions with their reactions to other possibly invasive questions through a self-report survey. Trauma questions caused relatively minimal distress and were perceived as having greater importance and greater cost-benefit ratings compared to other kinds (...)
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  42. Martha Crouch (1991). The Very Structure of Scientific Research Mitigates Against Developing Products to Help the Environment, the Poor, and the Hungry. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 4 (2):151-158.
    From the arguments I have presented, I hope it is clear that the distinction between basic and applied research is tenuous. Certain areas of research and methods may be favoured over others because of intrinsic biases, which are predictive of the type of application possible. Believing in the neutrality of pure knowledge is like wearing blinders: scientists need not be too concerned about the way in which the knowledge they generate is used. In my own case, this belief led to (...)
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  43. Amedeo D'Angiulli & Lavonia Smith LeBeau (2002). On Boredom and Experimentation in Humans. Ethics and Behavior 12 (2):167 – 176.
    This article discusses the ethical and methodological issues associated with boredom experienced by human participants during psychological experiments. Ways are suggested in which informed consent, briefing, and debriefing can be used to prevent or remedy boredom induced during experiments. We address methodological and ethical concerns, and we discuss the advantages of the proposed approach for experimenters' practice and training of undergraduate students. Future directions for much needed research on these topics are also emphasized.
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  44. Rafael Dal-Re, Xavier Carné & Diego Gracia (eds.) (2013). Luces y sombras en la investigación clínica. Triacastela, Fundació Víctor Grífols I Lucas.
    La investigación clínica, entendida como la búsqueda de soluciones para los problemas que acechan a la salud es, por su objetivo, una de las actividades de mayor trascendencia para el ser humano. Esta obra colectiva, como su propio título indica, explora no solo lo mucho que de positivo (las luces) tiene la investigación clínica, cómo se realiza, qué problemas encuentra y qué soluciones se plantean, sino también algunos aspectos negativos (las sombras) que la comunidad científica ha sido, hasta la fecha, (...)
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  45. Arlene M. Davis, Sara Chandros Hull, Christine Grady, Benjamin S. Wilfond & Gail E. Henderson (2002). The Invisible Hand in Clinical Research: The Study Coordinator's Critical Role in Human Subjects Protection. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (3):411-419.
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  46. Michael Davis (1990). The New World of Research Ethics: A Preliminary Map. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (1):1-10.
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  47. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2013). Patenting and the Gender Gap: Should Women Be Encouraged to Patent More? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):491-504.
    The commercialization of academic science has come to be understood as economically desirable for institutions, individual researchers, and the public. Not surprisingly, commercial activity, particularly that which results from patenting, appears to be producing changes in the standards used to evaluate scientists’ performance and contributions. In this context, concerns about a gender gap in patenting activity have arisen and some have argued for the need to encourage women to seek more patents. They believe that because academic advancement is mainly dependent (...)
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  48. Inmaculada de Melo-Martin (2009). How Do Disclosure Policies Fail? Let Us Count the Ways. FASEB Journal 23 (6):1638-42.
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  49. Raymond De Vries, Debra A. DeBruin & Andrew Goodgame (2004). Ethics Review of Social, Behavioral, and Economic Research: Where Should We Go From Here'. Ethics and Behavior 14 (4):351 – 368.
    It is not unusual for researchers to complain about institutional review board (IRB) oversight, but social scientists have a unique set of objections to the work of ethics committees. In an effort to better understand the problems associated with ethics review of social, behavioral, and economic sciences (SBES) research, this article examines 3 different aspects of research ethics committees: (a) the composition of review boards; (b) the guidelines used by these boards to review SBES - and in particular, behavioral health (...)
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  50. Evan G. DeRenzo (1997). Decisionally Impaired Persons in Research: Refining the Proposed Refinements. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (2-3):139-149.
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