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  1. Philip Alperson (ed.) (1992). The Philosophy of the Visual Arts. Oxford University Press.
    Most instructors who teach introductory courses in aesthetics or the philosophy of arts use the visual arts as their implicit reference for "art" in general, yet until now there has been no aesthetics anthology specifically orientated to the visual arts. This text stresses conceptual and theoretical issues, first examining the very notion of "the visual arts " and then investigating philosophical questions raised by various forms, from painting, the paradigmatic form, to sculpture, photography, film, dance, kitsch, and other forms on (...)
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  2. Rudolf Arnheim (1984). Notes on Seeing Sculpture. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 42 (3):319-321.
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  3. Rudolf Arnheim (1948). The Holes of Henry Moore: On the Function of Space in Sculpture. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 7 (1):29-38.
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  4. A. Berleant (1985). Art, Artistry and Sculpture. [REVIEW] Human Studies 8 (2):183-190.
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  5. Donald Brook (1969). Perception and the Appraisal of Sculpture. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 27 (3):323-330.
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  6. Stanley Casson (1935). An Approach to Greek Sculpture An Approach to Greek Sculpture. By A. J. B. Wace. Pp. 52. Cambridge: University Press, 1935. Paper, 2s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 49 (05):183-184.
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  7. Chung-yuan Chang (1969). On Stephen C. Pepper's "on the Uses of Symbolism in Sculpture and Painting". Philosophy East and West 19 (3):279-283.
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  8. George Combe (1855). Phrenology Applied to Painting and Sculpture.
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  9. Paul Crowther (2007). Space, Place, and Sculpture: Working with Heidegger. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 40 (2):151-170.
    Heidegger’s paper ‘Art and Space’ (1969, Man and world 6. Bloomington: Indiana university Press) is the place where he gives his fullest discussion of a major art medium which is somewhat neglected in aesthetics, namely sculpture. The structure of argument in ‘Art and Space’ is cryptic even by Heidegger’s standards. The small amount of literature tends to focus on the paper’s role within Heidegger’s own oeuvre as an expression of changes in his understanding of space. This is ironic; for Heidegger’s (...)
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  10. Arnold Cusmariu (2015). Baudelaire's Critique of Sculpture. Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (3):96-124.
    Am şlefuit materia pentru a afla linia continuă.Und das Problem ensteht: was is das, was übrigbleibt, wenn ich von der Tatsache, daß ich meinen Arm hebe, die abziehe, daß mein Arm sich hebt?Acknowledged to have launched modern poetry with Les Fleurs du mal, Charles Baudelaire was also a prolific and influential art critic, a close friend of Edouard Manet, and an early champion of Eugène Delacroix. At one time decidedly not a friend of sculpture, Baudelaire published a critique of this (...)
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  11. Arnold Cusmariu (2009). The Structure of an Aesthetic Revolution. Journal of Visual Arts Practice 8 (3):163-179.
    Brought about through philosophical analysis – a first in the history of art – paradigm shifts in the ontology and epistemology of sculpture are described, motivated, and exemplified with pieces they inspired. Navigating the new aesthetic environment requires an ‘escape from Plato's Cave’ by means of a kind of phenomenological reduction. The new conceptual foundation allows artists unprecedented levels of freedom to explore and innovate, connects sculpture to music, and has the potential to enhance significantly the appreciation of art and (...)
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  12. A. M. Daniel (1908). Roman Sculpture Roman Sculpture From Augustus to Constantine, by Mrs. Arthur Strong. Pp. Xx + 410; 130 Plates. London (Duckworth and Co.) and New York (Charles Scribner's Sons). 1907. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 22 (03):85-87.
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  13. Johan de Smedt & Helen de Cruz (2011). A Cognitive Approach to the Earliest Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):379-389.
    This paper takes a cognitive perspective to assess the significance of some Late Palaeolithic artefacts (sculptures and engraved objects) for philosophicalconcepts of art. We examine cognitive capacities that are necessary to produceand recognize objects that are denoted as art. These include the ability toattribute and infer design (design stance), the ability to distinguish between themateriality of an object and its meaning (symbol-mindedness), and an aesthetic sensitivity to some perceptual stimuli. We investigate to what extent thesecognitive processes played a role in (...)
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  14. William Dean (1983). Sculpture and Enlivened Space. Process Studies 13 (1):113-116.
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  15. Eliot S. Deutsch (1965). Śakti in Medieval Hindu Sculpture. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (1):81-89.
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  16. ErikKoed (2005). Sculpture and the Sculptural. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (2):147–154.
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  17. Philipp P. Fehl (1973). On the Representation of Character in Renaissance Sculpture. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (3):291-307.
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  18. Filippo Fimiani (2012). Fantasmi Dell'arte: Sei Storie Con Spettatore. Liguori.
    « The destiny of Art—a revenant». « The object of Art might be to seek to eliminate the necessity of the object ». This book’s theme and method stand halfway between these two assertions—the first by the German romantic poet Novalis, the second by the Californian post-minimalist artists Robert Irwin and James Turrell about a research program on art and technology in the late 1960s. Neither of these statements declares that art is dead. On the contrary, they announce that art (...)
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  19. Thomas Frangenberg (1995). The Art of Talking About Sculpture: Vasari, Borghini and Bocchi. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 58:115-131.
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  20. Kate Gordon (1909). Ildebrand's Problem of Form in Painting and Sculpture. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 6 (5):136.
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  21. James Hall (2013). The Blind Spot: An Essay on the Relations Between Painting and Sculpture in the Modern Age. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (4):ayt005.
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  22. Johann Gottfried Herder (2002). Sculpture: Some Observations on Shape and Form From Pygmalion's Creative Dream. University of Chicago Press.
    "The eye that gathers impressions is no longer the eye that sees a depiction on a surface it becomes a hand, the ray of light becomes a finger, and the imagination becomes a form of immediate touching."-Johann Gottfried Herder Long recognized as one of the most important eighteenth-century works on aesthetics and the visual arts, Johann Gottfried Herder's Plastik (Sculpture, 1778) has never before appeared in a complete English translation. In this landmark essay, Herder combines rationalist and empiricist thought with (...)
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  23. Adolf Hildebrand, Max Meyer & Robert Morris Ogden (1909). The Problem of Form in Painting and Sculpture. Philosophical Review 18 (1):91-92.
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  24. Robert Hopkins (2005). Sculpture. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. OUP Oxford 572-582.
    What, if anything, is aesthetically distinctive about sculpture? Some think that sculpture differs from painting in being a specially tactile art. Different things might be meant by this, but it is anyway unhelpful to focus on our means of access to sculpture’s aesthetic properties, rather than those properties themselves. A more promising idea is that, while painting provides its own space, sculpture exists in the space of the gallery. To pursue this thought, I expound and develop the views of Susanne (...)
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  25. Robert Hopkins (2004). Painting, Sculpture, Sight, and Touch. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):149-166.
    I raise two questions that bear on the aesthetics of painting and sculpture. First, painting involves perspective, in the sense that everything represented in a painting is represented from a point, or points, within represented space; is sculpture also perspectival? Second, painting is specially linked to vision; is sculpture linked in this way either to vision or to touch? To clarify the link between painting and vision, I describe the perspectival structure of vision. Since this is the same structure we (...)
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  26. Robert Hopkins (2003). Sculpture and Space. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge 272-290.
    What is distinctive about sculpture as an artform? I argue that it is related to the space around it as painting and the other pictorial arts are not. I expound and develop Langer's suggestive comments on this issue, before asking what the major strengths and weaknesses of that position might be.
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  27. Robert Hopkins (1994). Resemblance and Misrepresentation. Mind 103 (412):421-438.
    One problem faced by resemblance views of depiction is posed by the misrepresentation. Another is to specify the respect in which pictures resemble their objects. To isolate the first, I discuss resemblance in the context of sculpture, where the solution to the second is, prima facie, obvious. The point of appealing to resemblance is to explain how the representation has the content it does. In the case of misrepresenting sculptures, this means appealing to resemblance, not between the sculpture and the (...)
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  28. Stephen Houlgate (2007). Hegel on the Beauty of Sculpture. In Hegel and the Arts. Northwestern University Press
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  29. James Jackson Jarves (1855). Art-Hints. Architecture, Sculpture, and Painting. Harper & Brothers, Publishers, Franklin Square.
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  30. Gavin Keeney, Vertiginous Acedie.
    Review of “Gaiety is the Most Outstanding Feature of the Soviet Union: New Art from Russia,” Saatchi Gallery, London, England, and “Calder After the War,” Pace Gallery, London, England, April 2013. A version of this essay appeared in the Appendices of Gavin Keeney, Not-I/Thou: The Other Subject of Art and Architecture (CSP, 2014), pp. 157-60.
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  31. Juliette Kennedy (forthcoming). Kant, Co-Production, Actuality and Pedestrian Space: On the Philosophical Writings of Fred Sandback. In Roman Kossak & Philip Ording (eds.), Simplicity. Springer
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  32. Haig Khatchadourian (1974). On the Nature of Painting and Sculpture. British Journal of Aesthetics 14 (4):326-343.
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  33. A. W. Lawrence (1936). Illustrations of Greek Sculpture D. C. Wilkinson : Greek Sculpture. Pp. Xvi; 104 Half-Tone Plates. London : Chatto and Windus, 1936. Cloth, 5s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (05):186-.
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  34. F. David Martin (1980). Sculpture and Enlivened Space Aesthetics and History /F. David Martin. --. --. University Press of Kentucky, C1981.
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  35. F. David Martin (1978). Sculpture, Painting, and Damage. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (1):47-52.
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  36. F. David Martin (1976). Sculpture and Place. Dialectics and Humanism 3 (2):45-55.
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  37. F. David Martin (1976). Sculpture and Place. Dialectics and Humanism 3 (2):45-55.
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  38. F. David Martin (1976). The Autonomy of Sculpture. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (3):273-286.
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  39. Charles W. Millard (1975). Sculpture and Theory in Nineteenth Century France. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (1):15-20.
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  40. Micheline Montgomery (1991). What is Mask for Sculptor and for Sculpture.
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  41. Prithwish Neogy (1969). On Stephen C. Pepper's "on the Uses of Symbolism in Sculpture and Painting". Philosophy East and West 19 (3):284-285.
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  42. Leslie B. Nerio (1969). On Stephen C. Pepper's "on the Uses of Symbolism in Sculpture and Painting". Philosophy East and West 19 (3):286-289.
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  43. Michel Onfray (1993). La Sculpture de Soi la Morale Esthétique. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  44. Stephen C. Pepper (1969). On the Uses of Symbolism in Sculpture and Painting. Philosophy East and West 19 (3):265-278.
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  45. Ellen Perry (2004). The Aesthetics of Emulation in the Visual Arts of Ancient Rome. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  46. A. D. Potts (1980). Greek Sculpture and Roman Copies I: Anton Raphael Mengs and the Eighteenth Century. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 43:150-173.
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  47. George Lansing Raymond (1909). Painting, Sculpture and Architecture as Representative Arts an Essay in Comparative Æthetics. G.P. Putnam's Sons.
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  48. D. S. Robertson (1933). Daedalus and Thespis: The Contributions of the Ancient Dramatic Poets to Our Knowledge of the Arts and Crafts of Greece. By Walter Miller. Vol. II: Sculpture. Pp. Xv + 331–597 (Continuous with Paging of Vol. I); 45 Plates. University of Missouri, Columbia, 1931. 2½ Dollars. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 47 (04):148-.
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  49. L. R. Rogers (1984). The Role of Subject-Matter in Sculpture. British Journal of Aesthetics 24 (1):14-26.
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  50. L. R. Rogers (1983). Sculpture, Space and Being Within Things. British Journal of Aesthetics 23 (2):164-168.
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