Bookmark and Share

Sex Selection

Edited by Ruchika Mishra (Program in Medicine and Human Values, California Pacific Medical Center)
Related categories
Siblings:
35 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Jonny Anomaly (forthcoming). Public Goods and Procreation. Monash Bioethics Review.
    Procreation is the ultimate public goods problem. Each new child affects the welfare of many other people, and some (but not all) children produce uncompensated value that future people will enjoy. This essay addresses challenges that arise if we think of procreation and parenting as public goods. These include whether private choices are likely to lead to a socially desirable outcome, and whether changes in laws, social norms, or access to genetic engineering and embryo selection might improve the aggregate outcome (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. T. Chappell (1997). Sex Selection for Non-Medical Reasons: Advisory Report of the Standing Committee on Medical Ethics and Health Law of the Health Council of the Netherlands. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (2):120-121.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Carl H. Coleman (2001). Is There a Constitutional Right to Preconception Sex Selection? American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):27 – 28.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jenny Dai (2001). Preconception Sex Selection: The Perspective of a Person of the Undesired Gender. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):37 – 38.
    (2001). Preconception Sex Selection: The Perspective of a Person of the Undesired Gender. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 37-38.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín (2013). Sex Selection and the Procreative Liberty Framework. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (1):1-18.
    Although surprising to some proponents of sex selection for non-medical reasons (Dahl 2005), a considerable amount of critical debate has been raised by this practice (Blyth, Frith, and Crawshaw 2008; Dawson and Trounson 1996; Dickens 2002; Harris 2005; Heyd 2003; Holm 2004; Macklin 2010; Malpani 2002; McDougall 2005; Purdy 2007; Seavilleklein and Sherwin 2007; Steinbock 2002; Strange and Chadwick 2010; Wilkinson 2008). While abortion or infanticide has long been used as means of sex selection, a new technology—preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)—has (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. B. M. Dickens (2002). Can Sex Selection Be Ethically Tolerated? Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (6):335-336.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Richard V. Grazi, Joel B. Wolowelsky & David J. Krieger (2008). Sex Selection by Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) for Nonmedical Reasons in Contemporary Israeli Regulations. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (03):293-299.
    We report here on recent developments in Israel on the issue of sex selection for nonmedical reasons by preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Sex selection for medical reasons (such as in cases of sex-linked genetic diseases) is generally viewed as uncontroversial and legal in European and American law. Its use for nonmedical reasons (like the gender ratio in a family) is generally illegal in European countries. In the United States, it is not illegal, although in the opinion of the Ethics Committee (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Louis Marx Hall, The Ethics of Using Genetic Engineering for Sex Selection.
    It is quite probable that one will soon be able to use genetic engineering to select the gender of one’s child by directly manipulating the sex of an embryo. Some might think that this method would be a more ethical method of sex selection than present technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), since, unlike PGD, it does not need to create and destroy “wrong-gendered” embryos. This paper argues that those who object to present technologies on the ground that the (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. J. Harris (2005). No Sex Selection Please, We're British. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (5):286-288.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. J. Harris (2005). Sex Selection and Regulated Hatred. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (5):291-294.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Peter Herissone-Kelly (2007). Parental Love and the Ethics of Sex Selection. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (03):326-335.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Peter Herissone-Kelly (2007). The “Parental Love” Objection to Nonmedical Sex Selection: Deepening the Argument. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (04):446-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Peter Herissone-Kelly (2006). The Prohibition of Sex Selection for Social Reasons in the United Kingdom: Public Opinion Trumps Reproductive Liberty? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (03):261-272.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Søren Holm (2004). Like a Frog in Boiling Water: The Public, the HFEA and Sex Selection. Health Care Analysis 12 (1):27-39.
    This paper analyses the British Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority's 2002 public consultation on sex selection, a consultation that was mainly concerned with sex selection for non-medical reasons. Based on a close reading of the consultation document and questionnaire it is argued that the consultation is biased towards certain outcomes and can most plausibly be construed as an attempt not to investigate but to influence public opinion.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Sheri L. Johnson & Neil J. Gemmell (2012). Are Old Males Still Good Males and Can Females Tell the Difference? Bioessays 34 (7):609-619.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Owen D. Jones (2001). Controlling Consequences of Preconception Sex Selection. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):19 – 20.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Kusum (1993). The Use of Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques for Sex Selection: The Indian Scene. Bioethics 7 (2-3):149-165.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. R. Landau (2008). Sex Selection for Social Purposes in Israel: Quest for the "Perfect Child" of a Particular Gender or Centuries Old Prejudice Against Women? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e10-e10.
  19. S. Matthew Liao (2005). The Ethics of Using Genetic Engineering for Sex Selection. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):116-118.
    It is quite probable that one will soon be able to use genetic engineering to select the gender of one’s child by directly manipulating the sex of an embryo. Some might think that this method would be a more ethical method of sex selection than present technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), since, unlike PGD, it does not need to create and destroy “wrong-gendered” embryos. This paper argues that those who object to present technologies on the ground that the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. S. Matthew Liao (2005). The Ethics of Using Genetic Engineering for Sex Selection. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):116-118.
    It is quite probable that one will soon be able to use genetic engineering to select the gender of one’s child by directly manipulating the sex of an embryo. Some might think that this method would be a more ethical method of sex selection than present technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), since, unlike PGD, it does not need to create and destroy “wrong-gendered” embryos. This paper argues that those who object to present technologies on the ground that the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. S. Matthew Liao (2005). The Ethics of Using Genetic Engineering for Sex Selection. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (2):116-118.
    It is quite likely that parents will soon be able to use genetic engineering to select the sex of their child by directly manipulating the sex of an embryo. Some might think that this method would be a more ethical method of sex selection than present technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) because, unlike PGD, it does not need to create and destroy “wrong gendered” embryos. This paper argues that those who object to present technologies on the grounds that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. R. McDougall (2005). Acting Parentally: An Argument Against Sex Selection. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (10):601-605.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Anna Mudde (2010). "Before You Formed in the Womb I Knew You": Sex Selection and Spaces of Ambiguity. Hypatia 25 (3):553 - 576.
    The spaces provided by biotechnologies of sex selection are rich with epistemological, ontological, and ethical considerations that speak to broadly held social values and epistemic frameworks. In much of the discourse about sex sehction that is not medically indicated, the figure of the "naturally" conceived (future) child is treated as a problem f or parents who want to select the sex of their child. As unknown, that child is ambiguous in terms of sex — "it" is both and neither, and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Bang Nguyen Pham, Wayne Hall, Peter S. Hill & Chalapati Rao, Analysis of Socio-Political and Health Practices Influencing Sex Ratio at Birth in Viet Nam.
    Viet Nam has experienced rapid social change over the last decade, with a remarkable decline in fertility to just below replacement level. The combination of fertility decline, son preference, antenatal sex determination using ultrasound and sex selective abortion are key factors driving increased sex ratios at birth in favour of boys in some Asian countries. Whether or not this is taking place in Viet Nam as well is the subject of heightened debate. In this paper, we analyse the nature and (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David B. Resnik (2001). Difficulties with Regulating Sex Selection. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):21 – 22.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Rosamond Rhodes (2001). Acceptable Sex Selection. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):31 – 32.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Mark V. Sauer (2001). Preconception Sex Selection: A Commentary. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):28 – 29.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Rosamund Scott (2007). Choosing Between Possible Lives: Law and Ethics of Prenatal and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis. Hart.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Victoria Seavilleklein & Susan Sherwin (2006). The Myth of the Gendered Chromosome: Sex Selection and the Social Interest. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (01):7-19.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jenny Slatman, Annemie Halsema & Guy Widdershoven (2010). Sex and Enhancement: A Phenomenological-Existential View. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):20-22.
  31. Holly Smith, Amniocentesis for Sex Selection.
    in Ethics, Humanism, and Medicine, ed. Marc Basson (New York: Alan R. Liss, 1980), pp. 81-94.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Juliet Tizzard (2004). Sex Selection, Child Welfare and Risk: A Critique of the HFEA's Recommendations on Sex Selection. Health Care Analysis 12 (1):61-68.
    This paper will examine the recent Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority public consultation on sex selection. It will review the current regulation on sex selection in the United Kingdom and critically examine the outcomes of the HFEA consultation. The paper will argue that the current ban on embryo sex selection for social reasons and a proposed ban on sperm selection are not justified. There is no evidence for sex selection causing an increase in sex discrimination; creating a slippery slope towards (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Dorothy C. Wertz (2001). Preconception Sex Selection: A Question of Consequences. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):36 – 37.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Sophia Isako Wong (2002). At Home with Down Syndrome and Gender. Hypatia 17 (3):89-117.
    : I argue that there is an important analogy between sex selection and selective abortion of fetuses diagnosed with Down syndrome. There are surprising parallels between the social construction of Down syndrome as a disability and the deeply entrenched institutionalization of sexual difference in many societies. Prevailing concepts of gender and mental retardation exert a powerful influence in constructing the sexual identities and life plans of people with Down syndrome, and also affect their families' lives.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Julie Zilberberg (2007). Sex Selection and Restricting Abortion and Sex Determination. Bioethics 21 (9):517–519.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation