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Sexual Activities

Edited by Benjamin Smart (University of Birmingham, University of Johannesburg)
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  1. Nancy L. Arbuthnot (1983). Incest Avoidance. Nexus 3 (1):1.
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  2. L. Armstrong (1996). The Great Incest Hijack. In Diane Bell & Renate Klein (eds.), Radically Speaking: Feminism Reclaimed. Spinifex Press. 87--91.
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  3. Phd Arthur Wolf (2002). Is This Incest? Lahey Clinic Medical Ethics Journal 9 (2):3-7.
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  4. Ros Ballaster (2005). Incest and the English Novel, 1684-1814. [REVIEW] Clio 34:480-485.
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  5. B. Bawinlegros & Sa Salvaggio (1990). Prometheus Against the Moralists-From Incest to Sexual Abuse-Ethical Rereading. Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie 88:141-155.
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  6. Norbert Bischof, The Biological Foundations of the Incest Taboo.
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  7. Udo Borgert (2008). Society's Secret Crime. Thomas Baum's Kalte Hande in the Context of Contemporary Incest Dramas. Literature & Aesthetics 18 (2):9-38.
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  8. RogerV Burton (1973). Folk Theory and the Incest Taboo. Ethos 1 (4):504-516.
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  9. Kathleen Chatman (2001). Seeing Reason: Incest, Ideology, Institutions. Dissertation, University of Kansas
    Seeing Reason is an essay in feminist philosophy, which investigates epistemological issues related to the scholarly understanding of incest in the modern social sciences and to recent controversies about the truth or falsehood of long-forgotten and later recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse . ;The dissertation explores the difficulties women have faced in becoming knowing subjects of their own lives under patriarchy. Masculinist discourses have traditionally denied that incest occurred, either because exogamous marriage customs were assumed to have effectively outlawed (...)
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  10. Amanda Fernbach (2002). Fantasies of Fetishism From Decadence to the Post-Human. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  11. Siby K. George (2010). The Cosmopolitan Self and the Fetishism of Identity. In Stan van Hooft & Wim Vandekerckhove (eds.), Questioning Cosmopolitanism. Springer. 63--82.
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  12. Gillian Gillison (1987). Incest and the Atom of Kinship: The Role of the Mother's Brother in a New Guinea Highlands Society. Ethos 15 (2):166-202.
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  13. Patricia A. Halliday (2004). Conceptions of Agency and Responsibility in the Language of Incest. Dissertation, University of Oregon
    Incest is a highly charged issue in our society, and although many groups and individuals have tried for more than thirty years to eradicate the practice of incest, our society remains incest-prone. Through a careful feminist analysis of incest discourses, I argue that the concept of agency embedded in some traditional epistemological and current ethical/political theories reinforces the practice of incest in our society. In response, I propose an alternative conception of agency, one that will encourage new knowledge practices and (...)
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  14. Sandra L. Hampson (1996). The Decadent Decades: A Phenomenology of Fetishism in the Turn-of-the-Century French Novel: The Case of Huysmans. Dissertation, Cornell University
    Traditionally, the fetish is a material object invested with religious significance by a human subject, but the contemporary concept subsumes any form of human obsession for any object, on the part of the perceiving subject. Fetishism occurring in aesthetic production is the construction of a material Other. The fetish is constituted as a fictionalization; as the agency of human obsession governing materially significant details. ;Chapter One charts an overview of fetishism and its subsequent adoption by contemporary theorists as an interpretive (...)
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  15. Christopher Hitchens (2005). Fetishism. Free Inquiry 25.
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  16. Sigal Klipstein (2001). New Reproductive Options and the Incest Taboo. Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (3):234-240.
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  17. Laura Makarius (1960). The Incest Prohibition and Food Taboos. Diogenes 30:41.
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  18. Keizaburo Maruyama (1984). Bunka No Fetishizumu. Keiso Shobo.
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  19. E. L. Mccallum (1999). Object Lessons How to Do Things with Fetishism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  20. Ellen Lee Mccallum (1996). Object Lessons: Fetishism, Subjective Knowledge, and Objective Desire. Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
    This dissertation examines theories of fetishism, with the aim both to redefine fetishism as a positive strategy for postmodern thought and to examine the implications fetishism holds for modern assumptions about the nature of the world and its inhabitants. It is a serious effort not just to think about fetishism, but more importantly to think through fetishism, using it as a strategic perspective for analysing assumptions about subjects and objects, desire and knowledge, identity and sexual differences. The method incorporates close (...)
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  21. E. Mornin (2000). The German Bildungsroman: Incest and Inheritance. By Michael Minden. The European Legacy 5 (4):596-596.
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  22. Andrea Nicki (2009). Incest Survivors and "Borderline Personality Disorder". Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 4:1-3.
    This essay is about the common experiences of survivors of incest trauma and the psychiatric label of “borderline personality disorder” which harms their interests by keeping attention away from much needed societal changes. I draw a parallel with the survivors of a severe storm, seeking to illustrate the severe dii culties of incest survivors in a society that stigmatizes and marginalizes them. Because of negative thinking about incest survivors and their personalities and the societal minimization of incest as a serious (...)
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  23. Arthur Ripstein (1987). Commodity Fetishism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):733 - 748.
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  24. Eugene Rochberg-Halton (1984). The Fetishism of Signs. Semiotics:409-418.
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  25. Linda Rouillard (2003). Incest and the Medieval Imagination. [REVIEW] The Medieval Review 1.
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  26. Elizabeth Scala (1995). Incest Narratives and the Structure of Gower's “Confessio Amantis.”. [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (4):900-902.
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  27. Nancy Scheper-Hughes (2001). Commodity Fetishism in Organs Trafficking. Body and Society 7 (2-3):31-62.
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  28. Naomi Schor (1992). Fetishism. In Elizabeth Wright (ed.), Feminism and Psychoanalysis: A Critical Dictionary. Blackwell. 113--17.
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  29. R. Schott (1985). Morality and Fetishism. Cogito 3 (4).
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  30. David H. Spain (1990). Structure, Function, and the Continuing Discussion of the Westermarck‐Freud Incest‐Theory Debate: A Response to Walter. Ethos 18 (4):447-453.
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  31. Iris Marion Young (1993). Sexual Ethics in the Age of Epidemic. Hypatia 8 (3):184-193.
    In this essay I follow one argument strand from Linda Singer's Erotic Welfare. How can we have a forward-looking and affirmative ideal of sexual freedom when the AIDS panic has altered the sexual landscape and instigated new justifications for oppressive sexual disciplines? How can we be sexual subjects when processes of commodification and disciplinary practices have constrained sexual expression while proliferating sexual fetishes? These are some of the questions this book formulates, without answering.
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Bestiality
  1. Jurgen Habermas (1999). Bestiality and Humanity: A War on the Border Between Legality and Morality. Constellations 6 (3):263-272.
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  2. Neil Levy (2003). What (If Anything) is Wrong with Bestiality? Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (3):444–456.
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Fetishism
  1. Meter Amevans (1950). Fetishism in the Existentialism of Sartre. Journal of Philosophy 47 (14):407-411.
  2. David Andrews (2002). Commodity Fetishism as a Form of Life: Language and Value in Wittgenstein and Marx. In G. N. Kitching & Nigel Pleasants (eds.), Marx and Wittgenstein: Knowledge, Morality and Politics. Routledge. 35--78.
  3. Bettina Bergo (2007). Commentary on Tina Chanter's “Antigone's Excessive Relationship to Fetishism”. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 11 (2):261-273.
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  4. Allen Buchanan (1980). The Fetishism of Democracy: A Reply to Professor Gould. Journal of Philosophy 77 (11):729-731.
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  5. Antonio Calcagno, The Fetishism of Modernities: Epochal Self-Consciousness in Contemporary Social and Political Thought. By Bernard Yack (University of Notre Dame Press, South Bend, 1997).
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  6. Terrell Carver (1975). Marx's Commodity Fetishism. Inquiry 18 (1):39 – 63.
    Marx's work in the first chapters of Capital is sometimes taken to be ?metaphysical?, since his remarks do not lend themselves to ?scientific? testing against quantitative data. I argue that Marx aimed to re?present the economic theory of his day in order to reveal the characteristic presuppositions of capitalist society, and ? in the first instance ? to rid the theory of logical confusions. Though his distinctions are ingenious and his arguments consistent, the enterprise fails in certain respects, because he (...)
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  7. Tina Chanter (2007). Antigone's Excessive Relationship to Fetishism. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 11 (2):231-260.
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  8. Tina Chanter (2004). Abjection, or Why Freud Introduces the Phallus: Identification, Castration Theory, and the Logic of Fetishism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):48-66.
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  9. Kit R. Christensen (1987). Marx, Human Nature, and the Fetishism of Concepts. Studies in East European Thought 34 (3):135-171.
  10. Rebecca Comay (1999). Perverse History: Fetishism and Dialectic in Walter Benjamin. Research in Phenomenology 29 (1):51-62.
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  11. Alexandra Dobra (2010). What Does Marx Mean by the "Fetishism of Commodities" ? E-Logos Electronic Journal for Philosophy 10 (7):1-9.
    The present paper aims to analyse Marx’s concept of “fetishism of commodities” by explaining the mechanism of a social genesis of determined illusions, arising in the sphere of production and circulation of commodities. It highlights the existence of an auto-sustained autarkic system of 4 variables – reification, objectification, duplicity and habit - sustaining and leading to the fetishism of commodities.
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  12. Enrique Dussel (2003). The Concept of Fetishism in Marx's Thought (Elements for a General Marxist Theory of Religion), Part II of II. Radical Philosophy Review 6 (2):93-129.
    In this essay, Enrique Dussel provides a textual “rereading” of Karl Marx’s theory of fetishism according to his scattered but significant comments on religion as they extend throughout the whole of his work. In Part I, “The Place of the Subject of Religion in the Whole Work of Marx,” Dussel demonstrates Marx’s differentiation between a critique of the essence of religion and its manifestations, arguing that there is a space in Marx for a anti-fetishized liberatory religion. In Part II, “Toward (...)
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  13. Steven Farrelly-Jackson (1997). Fetishism and the Identity of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 37 (2):138-154.
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  14. Maurice A. Finocchiaro (1989). Fetishism, Argument, and Judgment Incapital. Studies in East European Thought 38 (3):237-244.
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  15. Gavin Fridell (2007). Fair-Trade Coffee and Commodity Fetishism: The Limits of Market-Driven Social Justice. Historical Materialism 15 (4):79-104.
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  16. Sean Homer (2005). Cinema and Fetishism: The Disavowal of a Concept. Historical Materialism 13 (1):85-116.
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  17. M. W. Howard (1980). Reviews : Mickael W. Howard -- From Commodity Fetishism to Market Socialism: Critical Notes on Stanley Moore. Philosophy and Social Criticism 7 (2):184-214.
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