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Sexual Activities

Edited by Benjamin Smart (University of Birmingham, University of Johannesburg)
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Bestiality
  1. Jurgen Habermas (1999). Bestiality and Humanity: A War on the Border Between Legality and Morality. Constellations 6 (3):263-272.
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  2. Neil Levy (2003). What (If Anything) is Wrong with Bestiality? Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (3):444–456.
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Fetishism
  1. Meter Amevans (1950). Fetishism in the Existentialism of Sartre. Journal of Philosophy 47 (14):407-411.
  2. David Andrews (2002). Commodity Fetishism as a Form of Life: Language and Value in Wittgenstein and Marx. In G. N. Kitching & Nigel Pleasants (eds.), Marx and Wittgenstein: Knowledge, Morality and Politics. Routledge. 35--78.
  3. Bettina Bergo (2007). Commentary on Tina Chanter's “Antigone's Excessive Relationship to Fetishism”. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 11 (2):261-273.
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  4. Allen Buchanan (1980). The Fetishism of Democracy: A Reply to Professor Gould. Journal of Philosophy 77 (11):729-731.
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  5. Antonio Calcagno, The Fetishism of Modernities: Epochal Self-Consciousness in Contemporary Social and Political Thought. By Bernard Yack (University of Notre Dame Press, South Bend, 1997).
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  6. Terrell Carver (1975). Marx's Commodity Fetishism. Inquiry 18 (1):39 – 63.
    Marx's work in the first chapters of Capital is sometimes taken to be ?metaphysical?, since his remarks do not lend themselves to ?scientific? testing against quantitative data. I argue that Marx aimed to re?present the economic theory of his day in order to reveal the characteristic presuppositions of capitalist society, and ? in the first instance ? to rid the theory of logical confusions. Though his distinctions are ingenious and his arguments consistent, the enterprise fails in certain respects, because he (...)
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  7. Tina Chanter (2007). Antigone's Excessive Relationship to Fetishism. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 11 (2):231-260.
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  8. Tina Chanter (2004). Abjection, or Why Freud Introduces the Phallus: Identification, Castration Theory, and the Logic of Fetishism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):48-66.
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  9. Kit R. Christensen (1987). Marx, Human Nature, and the Fetishism of Concepts. Studies in East European Thought 34 (3):135-171.
  10. Rebecca Comay (1999). Perverse History: Fetishism and Dialectic in Walter Benjamin. Research in Phenomenology 29 (1):51-62.
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  11. Enrique Dussel (2003). The Concept of Fetishism in Marx's Thought (Elements for a General Marxist Theory of Religion), Part II of II. Radical Philosophy Review 6 (2):93-129.
    In this essay, Enrique Dussel provides a textual “rereading” of Karl Marx’s theory of fetishism according to his scattered but significant comments on religion as they extend throughout the whole of his work. In Part I, “The Place of the Subject of Religion in the Whole Work of Marx,” Dussel demonstrates Marx’s differentiation between a critique of the essence of religion and its manifestations, arguing that there is a space in Marx for a anti-fetishized liberatory religion. In Part II, “Toward (...)
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  12. Steven Farrelly-Jackson (1997). Fetishism and the Identity of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 37 (2):138-154.
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  13. Maurice A. Finocchiaro (1989). Fetishism, Argument, and Judgment Incapital. Studies in East European Thought 38 (3):237-244.
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  14. Gavin Fridell (2007). Fair-Trade Coffee and Commodity Fetishism: The Limits of Market-Driven Social Justice. Historical Materialism 15 (4):79-104.
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  15. Sean Homer (2005). Cinema and Fetishism: The Disavowal of a Concept. Historical Materialism 13 (1):85-116.
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  16. M. W. Howard (1980). Reviews : Mickael W. Howard -- From Commodity Fetishism to Market Socialism: Critical Notes on Stanley Moore. Philosophy and Social Criticism 7 (2):184-214.
  17. Robin M. James (2007). Deconstruction, Fetishism, and the Racial Contract: On the Politics of "Faking It" in Music. CR 7 (1):45-80.
    I read Sara Kofman's work on Nietzsche, Charles Mills' _The Racial Contract_, and Kodwo Eshun's Afrofuturist musicology to argue that most condemnations of "faking it" in music rest on a racially and sexually problematic fetishization of "the real.".
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  18. Louise J. Kaplan (2006). Cultures of Fetishism. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In her latest book, Dr. Louise Kaplan, author of the groundbreaking Female Perversions, explores the fetishism strategy, a psychological defense that aims to tame, subdue, and if necessary, murder human vitalities. Through an exploration of such cultural phenomena as footbinding, reality television, and the construction of robots, Kaplan demonstrates how, in a technology-driven world, an understanding of the fetishism strategy can help to preserve the human dialogue that is the basis of all human relationships. Kaplan writes from the heart as (...)
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  19. Igor E. Klyukanov (2001). Semiotic Fetishism in Intercultural Communication. American Journal of Semiotics 17 (2):253-267.
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  20. A. Lang (1879). Mr. Max Müller and Fetishism. Mind 4 (16):453-469.
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  21. John Milios & Dimitri Dimoulis (2004). Commodity Fetishism Vs. Capital Fetishism: Marxist Interpretations Vis-à-Vis Marx's Analyses in Capital. Historical Materialism 12 (3):3-42.
  22. Donovan Miyasaki (2003). The Evasion of Gender in Freudian Fetishism. Psychoanalysis, Culture, and Society 8 (2):289-98.
    In Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality, Freud rejects the notion of a biologically determined connection of instinct to object, a position which helps him avoid the designation of all variations from heterosexuality as either “degenerate” or “pathological.” However, the gender roles and relations commonly attributed to heterosexuality are already implicit in his understanding of sexual instinct and aim. Consequently, even variations from the normal sexual object and aim exemplify, on his interpretation, the clichéd hierarchical opposition of femininity and (...)
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  23. Donovan Miyasaki (2002). The Confusion of Marxian and Freudian Fetishism in Adorno and Benjamin. Philosophy Today 46 (4):429-43.
    Both Theodor Adorno and Walter Benjamin borrow from Freudian theory in their analyses of fetishism’s relation to the contemporary reception of cultural products. I will argue that both authors have confused the Marxian and Freudian theories of fetishism, resulting in mistaken conclusions about artistic reception. By disentangling the Marxian and Freudian elements in both authors’ positions, I want to show that 1) Adorno’s characterization of regressive listening implies, contrary to his intentions, that the current reception of artwork is in fact (...)
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  24. Angela B. Moorjani (2000). Beyond Fetishism and Other Excursions in Psychopragmatics. St. Martin's Press.
    Do the meanings of the innumerable fetish-signs appearing in recent artworks depend on the senders' intentions? Is the meaning of postfeminist glamour the celebration of femininity that its practitioners tout to counter ersatz macho posturing? To fully examine and clarify these and other issues involving gender, postcolonial, and artistic otherness, this book argues for a more adequate view of performativity than presently available from speech-act theory and certain strains of linguistic pragmatics. In drawing simultaneously on Charles Sander Peirce’s pragmatic analysis (...)
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  25. Maurice Natanson (1951). Sartre's Fetishism: A Reply to Van Meter Ames. Journal of Philosophy 48 (4):95-99.
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  26. Elizabeth Purcell (2011). Fetishizing Ontology. Radical Philosophy Review 14 (1):67-84.
    Recently Slavoj Žižek has critiqued certain "feminist" readings of Lacan's feminine structure of desire, including Julia Kristeva, for postulating a feminine discourse which is supposedly beyond the phallic economy. This paper defends Kristeva's position, both by noting how Žižek Hegelian ontology prevents him from utilizing the resources of sexual difference and by clarifying Kristeva's double account of maternity. One consequence of this investigation is that a Kristevean theory of desire will provide one with a new form of political intervention by (...)
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  27. David M. Rasmussen (1975). The Symbolism of Marx: From Alienation to Fetishism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 3 (1):41-55.
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  28. G. W. Smith (2000). Book Reviews:The Fetishism of Modernities: Epochal Self‐Consciousness in Contemporary Social and Political Thought. [REVIEW] Ethics 111 (1):194-196.
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  29. Susan Squier (2000). Fetishism and Hysteria: The Economies of Feminism Ex Uterod. Journal of Medical Humanities 21 (2):59-69.
    Laurie Foos's feminist novel Ex Utero is a comic exploration of the value of the uterus. Simultaneously recursive and resistant, Foos's novel reenacts, with a difference, two confining essentialisms: hysteria, a female disorder, and fetishism, whether understood as the psychosexual response to female lack, or as capitalism's motor, the displacement of desire onto commodities. The essay explores how, if we think of the womb neither as individual possession or commodified object, we can create a new space of possibility for women (...)
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  30. Fred Stockholder (1990). Economic Fetishism and the Communications Model. World Futures 28 (1):121-140.
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  31. Eli Thorkelson (2008). Social Order, Fetishism and Reflexivity. Social Epistemology 22 (2):219 – 226.
    In response to Strydom, Nicoll and Gregg's queries, I draw out some further implications of my analysis of theory classrooms. I aim to clarify the theoretical basis of my concepts of social order and fetishism. I end by considering the pedagogical implications of my analysis. It seems to me that the contradiction between critical values and the classroom's forms of authority remain irresolvable.
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  32. Mike Wayne (2005). Fetishism and Ideology: A Reply to Dimoulis and Milios. Historical Materialism 13 (3):193-218.
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Flirting and Seduction
  1. C. S. Jenkins, The Philosophy of Flirting.
    I attempt to give necessary and sufficient conditions for when an act of flirtation has taken place.
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Incest
  1. Alfred Owen Aldridge (1951). The Meaning of Incest From Hutcheson to Gibbon. Ethics 61 (4):309-313.
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  2. Vera Bergelson (2013). Vice is Nice But Incest is Best: The Problem of a Moral Taboo. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):43-59.
    Incest is a crime in most societies. In the United States, incest is punishable in almost every state with sentences going as far as 20 and 30 years in prison, and even a life sentence. Yet the reasons traditionally proffered in justification of criminalization of incest—respecting religion and universal tradition; avoiding genetic abnormalities; protecting the family unit; preventing sexual abuse and sexual imposition; and precluding immorality—at a close examination, reveal their under- and over-inclusiveness, inconsistency or outright inadequacy. It appears that (...)
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  3. C. Farrelly (2008). The Case for Re-Thinking Incest Laws. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e11-e11.
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  4. Robert William Fischer (2012). Why Incest is Usually Wrong. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 19 (1):17-31.
    I contend that there are strong moral reasons for most adult family members to avoid having sex with one another; indeed, I argue that even among consenting adults, incestuous sex is usually wrong. The argument is simple. Absent compelling reasons, it's wrong to take a significant risk with something that's extremely valuable. But having sex with a family member takes a significant risk with something extremely valuable—namely, a family relationship. And since compelling reasons for taking such a risk are very (...)
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  5. George F. Franko (1995). Incest and Ridicule in the Poenulus of Plautus. Classical Quarterly 45 (01):250-.
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  6. Peter Hadreas (2002). Phenomenology and the Incest Taboo. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 33 (2):203-222.
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  7. Patricia A. Halliday (2005). Book Review: Tales of Trauma: A Review of Leigh Gilmore's the Limits of Autobiography: Trauma and Testimony (Cornell University Press, 2001) and Janice Doane and Devon Hodges's Telling Incest: Narratives of Dangerous Remembering From Stein to Sapphire (University of Michigan Press, 2001). [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (2):210-213.
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  8. S. J. Harrison (1996). Mythological Incest: Catullus 88. Classical Quarterly 46 (02):581-.
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  9. R. Higgs (1985). Mum's the Word: Confidentiality and Incest. Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (2):100-104.
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  10. Christian kerslake (2004). Rebirth Through Incest. Angelaki 9 (1):135 – 157.
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  11. Justin Leiber (2006). Instinctive Incest Avoidance: A Paradigm Case for Evolutionary Psychology Evaporates. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 36 (4):369–388.
  12. R. Makarius & E. P. Halperin (1960). The Incest Prohibition and Food Taboos. Diogenes 8 (30):41-61.
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  13. Andrew F. March, Is There a Right to Polygamy and Incest? Should a Liberal State Replace "Marriage" with "Registered Domestic Partnerships"?
    If a state with liberal political and justificatory commitments extends benefits of various kinds to persons forming families, what qualifications may such a state place on the right to access to those benefits? I will make two assumptions for the purposes of this paper. The first is the political and justificatory terrain of some form of political or otherwise non-perfectionist liberalism. The assumption is that we are considering the resources and limitations of a community of persons who accept moral pluralism (...)
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  14. Andrew F. March, Marriage, Sex and Future Persons in Liberal Public Justification: Is There a Right to Incest?
    In this article I consider whether there a right to incestuous marriage. I begin by suggesting that the liberal state get out of the "marriage" business by leveling down to a universal civil union or "registered domestic partnership" status. Removing the symbolism of the term "marriage" from political conflict, privatizing it in the same way as religion, would have the advantage of both consistency and political reconciliation. The question is then whether incestuous unions should be both legal and eligible for (...)
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