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  1. Andrew Altman (1996). Making Sense of Sexual Harassment Law. Philosophy and Public Affairs 25 (1):36–50.
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  2. Elizabeth Anderson (2006). Recent Thinking About Sexual Harassment: A Review Essay. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (3):284–312.
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  3. Jami L. Anderson (2009). Bodily Privacy, Toilets, and Sex Discrimination: The Problem of "Manhood" in a Women's Prison. In Olga Gershenson Barbara Penner (ed.), Ladies and Gents. 90.
    Unjustifiable assumptions about sex and gender roles, the untamable potency of maleness, and gynophobic notions about women's bodies inform and influence a broad range of policy-making institutions in this society. In December 2004, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit continued this ignoble cultural pastime when they decided Everson v. Michigan Department of Corrections. In this decision, the Everson Court accepted the Michigan Department of Correction's claim that “the very manhood” of male prison guards both threatens the safety (...)
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  4. David F. Austin, A Note on Universal Targeting and Hostile Environment Harassment.
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  5. David F. Austin (1999). (Sexual) Quotation Without (Sexual) Harassment?, Pornography in the College Classroom. In Vern Bullough & James Elias (eds.), Porn 101: Proceedings of the 1998 World Pornography Conference. Prometheus Books
  6. Benjamin Baez (2001). Sex Harassment in Schools: The Politics of Law, Power, Sexuality, and Speech. Educational Theory 51 (1):45-62.
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  7. Carl A. Bartling & Russell Eisenman (1993). Sexual Harassment Proclivities in Men and Women. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (3):189-192.
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  8. S. Gayle Baugh (1997). On the Persistence of Sexual Harassment in the Workplace. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (9):899-908.
    The persistence of sexual harassment in the workplace, despite the general abhorrence for the behavior and programs designed to eradicate it, is puzzling. This paper proposes that gender differences in perceptions of sexual harassment and power differentials in the workplace which permit men to legitimize and institutionalize their perspective are implicated. These two phenomena combine to result in blaming the victim of sexual harassment for her own plight. Shifting attention to the target of sexual harassment facilitates the persistence of sexual (...)
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  9. Myrtle P. Bell, Mary E. Mclaughlin & Jennifer M. Sequeira (2002). Discrimination, Harassment, and the Glass Ceiling: Women Executives as Change Agents. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 37 (1):65 - 76.
    In this article, we discuss the relationships between discrimination, harassment, and the glass ceiling, arguing that many of the factors that preclude women from occupying executive and managerial positions also foster sexual harassment. We suggest that measures designed to increase numbers of women in higher level positions will reduce sexual harassment. We first define and discuss discrimination, harassment, and the glass ceiling, relationships between each, and relevant legislation. We next discuss the relationships between gender and sexual harassment, emphasizing the influence (...)
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  10. Richard Bell (1998). Shielding Parties to Title VII Actions for Sexual Harassment From the Discovery of Their Sexual History - Should Rule 412 of the Federal Rules of Evidence Be Applicable to Discovery? Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 12 (1):285-342.
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  11. Piers Benn (1994). Sense and Sexual Harassment. Cogito 8 (2):135-141.
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  12. Ophelia Benson (2011). Sexual Harassment in Philosophy. The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):14-15.
    “Templeton is, to all intents and purposes, a propaganda organisation for religious outlooks; it should honestly say so and equally honestly devote its money to prop up the antique superstitions it favours, and not pretend that questions of religion are of the same kind and on the same level as those of science – by which means it persistently seeks to muddy the waters and keep religion credible in lay eyes.”.
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  13. Ophelia Benson (2011). Sexual Harassment in Philosophy. The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):14-15.
    “Templeton is, to all intents and purposes, a propaganda organisation for religious outlooks; it should honestly say so and equally honestly devote its money to prop up the antique superstitions it favours, and not pretend that questions of religion are of the same kind and on the same level as those of science – by which means it persistently seeks to muddy the waters and keep religion credible in lay eyes.”.
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  14. Ophelia Benson (2011). Sexual Harassment in Philosophy. The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):14-15.
    “Templeton is, to all intents and purposes, a propaganda organisation for religious outlooks; it should honestly say so and equally honestly devote its money to prop up the antique superstitions it favours, and not pretend that questions of religion are of the same kind and on the same level as those of science – by which means it persistently seeks to muddy the waters and keep religion credible in lay eyes.”.
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  15. P. Benson (forthcoming). Jane Gallop, Feminist Accused of Sexual Harassment. Radical Philosophy.
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  16. Peter Benson (1998). Feminist Accused of Sexual Harassment. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 89.
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  17. M. J. Booker (1998). Can Sexual Harassment Be Salvaged? Journal of Business Ethics 17 (11):1171-1177.
    Cases of sexual harassment have become increasingly common in the courts, but there is at present no coherent definition of just what sexual harassment is supposed to consist. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines ultimately focus on issues of subjective victimization, a standard which is overly broad and prescriptively empty. In order to salvage the concept of sexual harassment, it is argued here that the element of unwelcomeness must be removed from it. Instead of considering welcomeness, it is argued that (...)
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  18. Vern Bullough & James Elias (eds.) (1999). Porn 101: Proceedings of the 1998 World Pornography Conference. Prometheus Books.
  19. Susan Carle, Acknowledging Informal Power Dynamics in the Workplace: A Proposal for Further Development of the Vicarious Liability Doctrine in Hostile Environment Sexual Harassment Cases.
    In this Article I assess courts' application of the U.S. Supreme Court's affirmative defense doctrine in hostile environment sexual harassment cases. This doctrine provides that employers may avoid being held vicariously liable for hostile environment sexual harassment by supervisors if they can establish that: (1) they have taken reasonable measures to prevent sexual harassment, including setting up adequate complaint procedures, and (2) the employee who suffered sexual harassment unreasonably failed to avail herself of these procedures. This affirmative defense doctrine is (...)
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  20. Pat K. Chew, Freeing Racial Harassment From the Sexual Harassment Model.
    Judges, academics, and lawyers alike base their legal analyses of workplace racial harassment on the sexual harassment model. Legal principles derived from sexual harassment jurisprudence are presumed to be equally appropriate for racial harassment cases. The implicit assumption is that the social harms and public policy goals of racial harassment and sexual harassment are sufficiently similar to justify analogous scrutiny and remedies. Parties to racial harassment cases cite the reasoning and elements of sexual harassment cases without hesitation, as if racial (...)
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  21. J. Caleb Clanton (2009). A Critical Response to Thomas Peard on Sexual Harassment and the Limits of Free Speech. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):57-61.
  22. J. Caleb Clanton (2009). A Critical Response to Thomas Peard on Sexual Harassment and the Limits of Free Speech. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):57-61.
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  23. David S. Cohen, Limiting Gebser: Institutional Liability for Non-Harassment Sex Discrimination Under Title IX.
    In Gebser v. Lago Vista Independent School District, the Supreme Court set an exacting standard for establishing institutional liability under Title IX for a teacher sexually harassing a student. That standard, rejecting the simple application of agency principles and instead requiring a student to notify the school of the harassment and then the school to be deliberately indifferent to the student's complaints, has been inconsistently applied by lower courts faced with other, non-harassment forms of sex discrimination under Title IX. In (...)
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  24. Jean L. Cohen (1999). Personal Autonomy and the Law: Sexual Harassment and the Dilemma of Regulating "Intimacy". Constellations 6 (4):443-472.
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  25. Jean L. Cohen (1999). The Hijacking of Sexual Harassment. Constellations 6 (2):142-144.
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  26. Joanne Conaghan (1999). Enhancing Civil Remedies for (Sexual) Harassment: S.3 of the Protection From Harassment Act 1997. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 7 (2):203-214.
    This commentary explores the scope and content of the Protection from Harassment Act, recently introduced in the UK, focusing in particular on s.3 which creates a civil cause of action for harassment. The author considers the strategic possibilities for feminists concerned with enhancing remedies for sexual harassment as well as the drawbacks of the Act, particularly its capacity to be deployed in a wide range of contexts not all of which necessarily promote justice or enhance civil and political rights. The (...)
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  27. Joanne Conaghan (1993). Harassment and the Law of Torts: Khorasandjian V. Bush. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 1 (2):189-197.
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  28. Karen A. Crain & Kenneth A. Heischmidt (1995). Implementing Business Ethics: Sexual Harassment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (4):299 - 308.
    Sexual harassment is a problem for many organizations. Organizations must understand that sexual harassment lies within the broader context of sex discrimination and inequality of opportunity in the workplace. Sexual harassment is both an illegal and unethical practice. Companies need to implement a policy which respects the rights of individual employees by prohibiting sexual harassment. This policy need to be clearly stated in the company Code of Ethics and enforced rigorously.
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  29. Jan Crosthwaite & Graham Priest (1996). The Definition of Sexual Harassment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (1):66 – 82.
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  30. Jan Crosthwaite & Christine Swanton (1986). On the Nature of Sexual Harassment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (sup1):91-106.
  31. Margaret Crouch (2009). Sexual Harassment in Public Places. Social Philosophy Today 25:137-148.
    Most discussions of sexual harassment and laws addressing sexual harassment focus solely on sexual harassment in the workplace and/or in academe. In this paper, I will explore sexual harassment in public spaces such as streets and public transportation. Street and/or transportation harassment is a major problem for women in a number of countries. These forms of harassment constrain women’s freedom of movement, preventing them from taking advantage of opportunities at school, at work, and in politics. I will argue that such (...)
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  32. Margaret A. Crouch (2001). Thinking About Sexual Harassment: A Guide for the Perplexed. OUP Usa.
    Thinking About Sexual Harassment aims to provide the information necessary for careful, critical thinking about the concept of sexual harassment. Part I traces the construction of the concept of sexual harassment from the first public uses of the term through its definitions in the law, in legal cases, and in empirical research. Part II analyses philosophical definitions of sexual harassment and a number of issues that have arisen in the law, including the reasonable woman standard and whether same-sex harassment should (...)
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  33. Margaret A. Crouch (1998). The "Social Etymology" of 'Sexual Harassment'. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (3):19-40.
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  34. A. E. Cudd (2003). Thinking About Sexual Harassment: A Guide for the Perplexed. Philosophical Review 112 (1):121-123.
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  35. Joan L. Curcio, Lois F. Berlin & Patricia F. First (1996). Sexuality and the Schools Handling the Critical Issues. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  36. Claire P. Curtis (2003). Sexual Harassment. Teaching Philosophy 26 (1):111-114.
  37. Vrinda Dalmiya (1999). Why Is Sexual Harassment Wrong? Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (1):46-64.
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  38. Natalie Dandekar (1990). Contrasting Consequences: Bringing Charges of Sexual Harassment Compared with Other Cases of Whistleblowing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 9 (2):151 - 158.
    The phenomenon of whistleblowing seems puzzling in that whistleblowing presumably brings a wrongful practice to the attention of those with power to correct the situation. In this respect, whistleblowers act to serve the public interest in defeating harmful, illegal and unjust practices. Yet these persons suffer vilification and worse, not only from their fellow employees, but from members of the general public as well. Cases in which members of a discriminated minority report instances of job discrimination, and especially instances of (...)
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  39. N. Davis (1990). Sexual Harassment in the University. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Morality, Responsibility, and the University: Studies in Academic Ethics. Temple University Press 150--176.
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  40. Debra A. DeBruin (1998). A Critique of Superson's Feminist Definition of Sexual Harassment. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (1):49-62.
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  41. Moisés del Pino Peña (2008). Towards a Phenomenology of Harassment (Mobbing) at the Company. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 7:35-41.
    In industrial societies workplace is the only battlefield where people can kill another without running the risk of facing the courts (Leynman, 1996). This picture of dehumanization work reveals that organizations stand as the scene of the permissibility and the justification of harassment at the workplace (mobbing), whichincreased gradually and adverse effects are alarming at the moment, without considering the quality of working life because so far few companies have woken to the fact that it can no longer continue explaining (...)
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  42. Moisés del Pino Peña (2008). Towards a Phenomenology of Harassment (Mobbing) at the Company. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 7:35-41.
    In industrial societies workplace is the only battlefield where people can kill another without running the risk of facing the courts (Leynman, 1996). This picture of dehumanization work reveals that organizations stand as the scene of the permissibility and the justification of harassment at the workplace (mobbing), whichincreased gradually and adverse effects are alarming at the moment, without considering the quality of working life because so far few companies have woken to the fact that it can no longer continue explaining (...)
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  43. Moisés del Pino Peña (2008). Towards a Phenomenology of Harassment (Mobbing) at the Company. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 7:35-41.
    In industrial societies workplace is the only battlefield where people can kill another without running the risk of facing the courts (Leynman, 1996). This picture of dehumanization work reveals that organizations stand as the scene of the permissibility and the justification of harassment at the workplace (mobbing), whichincreased gradually and adverse effects are alarming at the moment, without considering the quality of working life because so far few companies have woken to the fact that it can no longer continue explaining (...)
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  44. Moisés del Pino Peña (2008). Towards a Phenomenology of Harassment (Mobbing) at the Company. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 7:35-41.
    In industrial societies workplace is the only battlefield where people can kill another without running the risk of facing the courts (Leynman, 1996). This picture of dehumanization work reveals that organizations stand as the scene of the permissibility and the justification of harassment at the workplace (mobbing), whichincreased gradually and adverse effects are alarming at the moment, without considering the quality of working life because so far few companies have woken to the fact that it can no longer continue explaining (...)
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  45. Filio Diamanti (2000). The Treatment of the 'Woman Question' in Radical Utopian Political Thought. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (2-3):116-139.
    (2000). The treatment of the ‘woman question’ in radical utopian political thought. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 3, The Philosophy of Utopia, pp. 116-139.
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  46. Susan M. Dodds, Lucy Frost, Robert Pargetter & Elizabeth W. Prior (1988). Sexual Harassment. Social Theory and Practice 14 (2):111-130.
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  47. Keith Dromm (2012). Sexual Harassment: An Introduction to the Conceptual and Ethical Issues. Broadview Press.
    Sexual Harassment: An Introduction to the Conceptual and Ethical Issues covers the most important normative, conceptual, and legal issues associated with sexual harassment. Keith Dromm provides an insightful introduction to the theoretical and practical discussion, examining the most influential approaches to sexual harassment and offering his own analyses. Each chapter ends with review questions, discussion questions, and suggestions for group activities.
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  48. Keith Dromm (2008). The Hostile Office : Michael as a Sexual Harasser (US). In Jeremy Wisnewski (ed.), The Office and Philosophy: Scenes From the Unexamined Life. Blackwell Pub.
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  49. Russell Eisenman (1999). Sexual Harassment Charges Against University Faculty: Three Case Histories. Journal of Information Ethics 8 (2):59-75.
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  50. Vaughana Macy Feary (1994). Sexual Harassment: Why the Corporate World Still Doesn't “Get It”. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (8):649 - 662.
    This paper shows that in order to understand and to resolve the problem of sexual harassment in the workplace, the corporate world will have to relinquish some myths. Sexual harassment does not result from ignorance about fact or law. It is not merely a cultural, gender, or communication problem. It is a problem which will be resolved only when the corporate world recognizes that sexual harassment is a moral problem and provides moral education for employees. Until then, it will remain (...)
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