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  1. Andrew Altman (1996). Making Sense of Sexual Harassment Law. Philosophy and Public Affairs 25 (1):36–50.
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  2. Elizabeth Anderson (2006). Recent Thinking About Sexual Harassment: A Review Essay. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (3):284–312.
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  3. Jami L. Anderson (2009). Bodily Privacy, Toilets, and Sex Discrimination: The Problem of "Manhood" in a Women's Prison. In Olga Gershenson Barbara Penner (ed.), Ladies and Gents.
    Unjustifiable assumptions about sex and gender roles, the untamable potency of maleness, and gynophobic notions about women's bodies inform and influence a broad range of policy-making institutions in this society. In December 2004, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit continued this ignoble cultural pastime when they decided Everson v. Michigan Department of Corrections. In this decision, the Everson Court accepted the Michigan Department of Correction's claim that “the very manhood” of male prison guards both threatens the safety (...)
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  4. David F. Austin, A Note on Universal Targeting and Hostile Environment Harassment.
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  5. David F. Austin (1999). (Sexual) Quotation Without (Sexual) Harassment?, Pornography in the College Classroom. In Vern Bullough & James Elias (eds.), Porn 101: Proceedings of the 1998 World Pornography Conference. Prometheus Books.
  6. Benjamin Baez (2001). Sex Harassment in Schools: The Politics of Law, Power, Sexuality, and Speech. Educational Theory 51 (1):45-62.
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  7. S. Gayle Baugh (1997). On the Persistence of Sexual Harassment in the Workplace. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (9):899-908.
    The persistence of sexual harassment in the workplace, despite the general abhorrence for the behavior and programs designed to eradicate it, is puzzling. This paper proposes that gender differences in perceptions of sexual harassment and power differentials in the workplace which permit men to legitimize and institutionalize their perspective are implicated. These two phenomena combine to result in blaming the victim of sexual harassment for her own plight. Shifting attention to the target of sexual harassment facilitates the persistence of sexual (...)
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  8. Piers Benn (1994). Sense and Sexual Harassment. Cogito 8 (2):135-141.
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  9. M. J. Booker (1998). Can Sexual Harassment Be Salvaged? Journal of Business Ethics 17 (11):1171-1177.
    Cases of sexual harassment have become increasingly common in the courts, but there is at present no coherent definition of just what sexual harassment is supposed to consist. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines ultimately focus on issues of subjective victimization, a standard which is overly broad and prescriptively empty. In order to salvage the concept of sexual harassment, it is argued here that the element of unwelcomeness must be removed from it. Instead of considering welcomeness, it is argued that (...)
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  10. J. Caleb Clanton (2009). A Critical Response to Thomas Peard on Sexual Harassment and the Limits of Free Speech. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):57-61.
  11. Jean L. Cohen (1999). Personal Autonomy and the Law: Sexual Harassment and the Dilemma of Regulating "Intimacy". Constellations 6 (4):443-472.
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  12. Jean L. Cohen (1999). The Hijacking of Sexual Harassment. Constellations 6 (2):142-144.
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  13. Karen A. Crain & Kenneth A. Heischmidt (1995). Implementing Business Ethics: Sexual Harassment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 14 (4):299 - 308.
    Sexual harassment is a problem for many organizations. Organizations must understand that sexual harassment lies within the broader context of sex discrimination and inequality of opportunity in the workplace. Sexual harassment is both an illegal and unethical practice. Companies need to implement a policy which respects the rights of individual employees by prohibiting sexual harassment. This policy need to be clearly stated in the company Code of Ethics and enforced rigorously.
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  14. Jan Crosthwaite & Graham Priest (1996). The Definition of Sexual Harassment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (1):66 – 82.
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  15. Jan Crosthwaite & Christine Swanton (1986). On the Nature of Sexual Harassment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (sup1):91-106.
  16. Margaret Crouch (2009). Sexual Harassment in Public Places. Social Philosophy Today 25:137-148.
    Most discussions of sexual harassment and laws addressing sexual harassment focus solely on sexual harassment in the workplace and/or in academe. In this paper, I will explore sexual harassment in public spaces such as streets and public transportation. Street and/or transportation harassment is a major problem for women in a number of countries. These forms of harassment constrain women’s freedom of movement, preventing them from taking advantage of opportunities at school, at work, and in politics. I will argue that such (...)
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  17. Margaret A. Crouch (2001). Thinking About Sexual Harassment: A Guide for the Perplexed. OUP USA.
    Thinking About Sexual Harassment aims to provide the information necessary for careful, critical thinking about the concept of sexual harassment. Part I traces the construction of the concept of sexual harassment from the first public uses of the term through its definitions in the law, in legal cases, and in empirical research. Part II analyses philosophical definitions of sexual harassment and a number of issues that have arisen in the law, including the reasonable woman standard and whether same-sex harassment should (...)
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  18. Margaret A. Crouch (1998). The "Social Etymology" of 'Sexual Harassment'. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (3):19-40.
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  19. A. E. Cudd (2003). Thinking About Sexual Harassment: A Guide for the Perplexed. Philosophical Review 112 (1):121-123.
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  20. Claire P. Curtis (2003). Sexual Harassment. Teaching Philosophy 26 (1):111-114.
  21. Vrinda Dalmiya (1999). Why Is Sexual Harassment Wrong? Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (1):46-64.
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  22. Natalie Dandekar (1990). Contrasting Consequences: Bringing Charges of Sexual Harassment Compared with Other Cases of Whistleblowing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 9 (2):151 - 158.
    The phenomenon of whistleblowing seems puzzling in that whistleblowing presumably brings a wrongful practice to the attention of those with power to correct the situation. In this respect, whistleblowers act to serve the public interest in defeating harmful, illegal and unjust practices. Yet these persons suffer vilification and worse, not only from their fellow employees, but from members of the general public as well. Cases in which members of a discriminated minority report instances of job discrimination, and especially instances of (...)
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  23. Debra A. DeBruin (1998). A Critique of Superson's Feminist Definition of Sexual Harassment. Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (1):49-62.
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  24. Filio Diamanti (2000). The Treatment of the 'Woman Question' in Radical Utopian Political Thought. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (2-3):116-139.
    (2000). The treatment of the ‘woman question’ in radical utopian political thought. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 3, The Philosophy of Utopia, pp. 116-139.
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  25. Susan M. Dodds, Lucy Frost, Robert Pargetter & Elizabeth W. Prior (1988). Sexual Harassment. Social Theory and Practice 14 (2):111-130.
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  26. Keith Dromm (2008). The Hostile Office : Michael as a Sexual Harasser (US). In Jeremy Wisnewski (ed.), The Office and Philosophy: Scenes From the Unexamined Life. Blackwell Pub..
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  27. Vaughana Macy Feary (1994). Sexual Harassment: Why the Corporate World Still Doesn't “Get It”. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (8):649 - 662.
    This paper shows that in order to understand and to resolve the problem of sexual harassment in the workplace, the corporate world will have to relinquish some myths. Sexual harassment does not result from ignorance about fact or law. It is not merely a cultural, gender, or communication problem. It is a problem which will be resolved only when the corporate world recognizes that sexual harassment is a moral problem and provides moral education for employees. Until then, it will remain (...)
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  28. Leslie Francis (2003). Book Review: Jane Flax. The American Dream in Black and White: The Clarence Thomas Hearings. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):232-235.
  29. Jane Gallop (1998). Book Review: Feminist Accused of Sexual Harassment. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 22 (2).
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  30. Mane Hajdin (1997). Sexual Harassment and Negligence. Journal of Social Philosophy 28 (1):37-53.
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  31. Mane Hajdin (1994). Sexual Harassment in the Law: The Demarcation Problem. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (3):102-122.
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  32. Carol Hay (2005). Whether to Ignore Them and Spin: Moral Obligations to Resist Sexual Harassment. Hypatia 20 (4):94-108.
    : In this essay, I consider the question of whether women have an obligation to confront men who sexually harass them. A reluctance to be guilty of blaming the victims of harassment, coupled with other normative considerations that tell in favor of the unfairness of this sort of obligation, might make us think that women never have an obligation to confront their harassers. But I argue that women do have this obligation, and it is not overridden by many of the (...)
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  33. M. Sandy Hershcovis, Sharon K. Parker & Tara C. Reich (2010). The Moderating Effect of Equal Opportunity Support and Confidence in Grievance Procedures on Sexual Harassment From Different Perpetrators. Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):415 - 432.
    This study drew on three theoretical perspectives – attribution theory, power, and role identity theory – to compare the job-related outcomes of sexual harassment from organizational insiders (i.e., supervisors and co-workers) and organizational outsiders (i.e., offend- ers and members of the public) in a sample ( n = 482) of UK police officers and police support staff. Results showed that sexual harassment from insiders was related (...)
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  34. Robert L. Holmes (1996). Sexual Harassment and the University. The Monist 79 (4):499-518.
  35. John C. Hughes & Larry May (1980). Sexual Harassment. Social Theory and Practice 6 (3):249-280.
  36. William B. Irvine (2000). Beyond Sexual Harassment. Journal of Business Ethics 28 (4):353 - 360.
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  37. Joann Keyton & Steven C. Rhodes (1997). Sexual Harassment: A Matter of Individual Ethics, Legal Definitions, or Organizational Policy? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (2):129-146.
    Although interest in business ethics has rapidly increased, little attention has been drawn to the relationship between ethics and sexual harassment. While most companies have addressed the problem of sexual harassment at the organizational level with corporate codes of ethics or sexual harassment policies, no research has examined the ethical ideology of individual employees. This study investigates the relationship between the ethical ideology of individual employees and their ability to identify social-sexual behaviors in superior-subordinate interactions. The results indicate that ethical (...)
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  38. Iddo Landau (2004). Sexual Harassment and the "Repetition Requirement". Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (1):79-83.
    In his "Reply to Iddo Landau," Edmund Wall responds to the author’s critique of some of the views expressed in his "Sexual Harassment and Wrongful Communication." The present article concentrates on what the author takes to be the main problem in Wall’s definition: by requiring that any act, even if intentional and cruel in nature, needs to be repeated to count as sexual harassment, Wall allows too much leeway and renders permissible a wide range of intentional, mean, and harmful actions (...)
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  39. Iddo Landau (2003). Sexual Harassment as "Wrongful Communication". Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (2):225-234.
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  40. Iddo Landau (1999). On the Definition of Sexual Harassment. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (2):216 – 223.
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  41. Jeffrey Paul Minson (1993). The Justification of Sexual Harassment. In K. B. Agrawal & R. K. Raizada (eds.), Sociological Jurisprudence and Legal Philosophy: Random Thoughts On. University Book House.
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  42. Ramona L. Paetzold & Bill Shaw (1994). A Postmodern Feminist View of “Reasonableness” in Hostile Environment Sexual Harassment. Journal of Business Ethics 13 (9):681 - 691.
  43. Thomas Peard (2009). Sexual Harassment in the Classroom. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (1):181-188.
  44. Lucia Peek, Maria Roxas, George Peek, Yves Robichaud, Blanca E. Covarrubias Salazar & Jose N. Barragan Codina (2007). NaFTA Students' Whistle-Blowing Perceptions: A Case of Sexual Harassment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):219 - 231.
    Business students from the three NAFTA countries were shown a possible Sexual Harassment scenario from Arthur Andersen’s Business Ethics Program. They were asked to respond to a pre-questionnaire concerning the three characters’ behaviors and possible actions and a post-questionnaire after writing a report from the points of view of the three characters in the scenario. The students were asked to consider whether the characters should report the possible harasser to their supervisor, and thus engage in whistle-blowing behavior, as well as (...)
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  45. James Rocha (2011). The Sexual Harassment Coercive Offer. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):203-216.
    There is disagreement in the coercion literature over whether an offer, which necessarily lacks a threat, could be coercive, which tends to imply at least some affinity with coercion, which, in paradigm cases, includes a threat. In one difficult sexual harassment case, someone is offered a promotion in exchange for sex, but there is, due to the arrangement of the case, no implied threat or repercussion for refusal. I argue this case counts as coercive since the offer-making attempts to recast (...)
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  46. Mattie Scott (1996). Sexual Harassment. Semiotics:26-37.
  47. Brian B. Stanko & Mark Schneider (1999). Sexual Harassment in the Public Accounting Profession? Journal of Business Ethics 18 (2):185 - 200.
    Federal discrimination laws have defined two distinct types of activity that constitute sexual harassment – "hostile environment" and "quid pro quo." The Civil Rights Act of 1991 and more recent Supreme Court rulings make it easier for workers to win lawsuits claiming they were sexually harassed in the work environment.While the public accounting profession continues to address gender-related problems, it remains vulnerable to claims of sexual harassment. In an attempt to better understand the underlying risk the public accounting profession faces, (...)
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  48. James P. Sterba (1996). Feminist Justice and Sexual Harassment. Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (1):103-122.
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  49. Anita M. Superson (1993). A Feminist Definition of Sexual Harassment. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (1):46-64.
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  50. James Stacey Taylor (2007). Autonomy, Responsibility, and Women's Obligation to Resist Sexual Harrassment. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (1):55-63.
    In a recent paper Carol Hay has argued for the conclusion that “a woman who has been sexually harassed has a moral obligation to confront her harasser.” I will argue in this paper that Hay’s arguments for her conclusion are unsound, for they rest on both a misconstrual of the nature of personal autonomy, and a misunderstanding of its relationship to moral responsibility. However, even though Hay’s own arguments do not support her conclusion that women have a duty to resist (...)
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