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  1. Alastair Blanshard (2003). Amor Graecus —or Romanus ? C. A. Williams: Roman Homosexuality. Ideologies of Masculinity in Classical Antiquity . Pp. XII + 395, Pls. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. Cases, £40. Isbn: 0-19-511300-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (02):468-.
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  2. Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.) (2011). Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi.
    One WHY LOVERS CAN'T BE FRIENDS James Conlon That one's spouse is also one's closest friend is a common claim and seems innocent enough. ...
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  3. Christine Overall (1991). AIDS and Women: The (Hetero)Sexual Politics of HIV Infection. In Christine Overall & William Zion (eds.), Perspectives On AIDS: Ethical and Social Issues. Oxford University Press.
  4. Brent Pickett, Homosexuality. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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Bisexuality
  1. Barbara S. Andrew (2001). Identity Without Selfhood: Bisexuality and Simone de Beauvoir (Review). Hypatia 16 (3):161-163.
  2. Barbara S. Andrew (2001). Book Review: Mariam Fraser. Identity Without Selfhood: Bisexuality and Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (3):161-163.
  3. C. R. Austin (1978). Bisexuality and the Problem of its Social Acceptance. Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (3):132-137.
    Professor Austin explores four main areas in this paper. First of all he outlines the physical development of sex differentiation in the embryo. He develops this by describing the clinical manifestations of abnormality which can appear at that stage. Professor Austin points out that there are relatively few people with abnormalities and that those who do show homosexual tendencies are not noticeably different from the norm in terms of their sexual equipment and hormone levels. It is much more likely that (...)
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  4. Corrinne Bedecarré (1997). Swear by the Moon. Hypatia 12 (3):189 - 197.
    In this article I discuss the argument/criticism/concerns of bisexuality that arise from within progressive communities which already accept gay and lesbian rights. Issues discussed include trust, heterosexuality and the body, the power dynamics of patriarchal oppression and subjective verification. The moon is evoked as a material metaphor for phases and changes. I argue that conditions of the world preclude political attachment to an excessively fixed standard of many things, including sexual orientation.
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  5. Melissa Burchard (2006). What's My Line? Gender, Performativity, and Bisexual Identity. Radical Philosophy Today 3:91-99.
    Although gay and lesbian theory may posit homosexuality as an oppositional challenge to heteronormativity, the author argues that homosexuality and heterosexuality share a common structure of desire that is based upon choosing the gender of one’s partner from only one gender in a binary gender framework. For this reason, the author introduces the term ‘monosexual’ to designate any sexual orientation, whether homosexual or heterosexual, which makes a single gender category into an exclusive criterion for selecting partners. As an alternative to (...)
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  6. E. Cantarella (2005). The Androgynous and Bisexuality in Ancient Legal Codes. Diogenes 52 (4):5-14.
    The word 'bisexuality', unknown to the ancients, is used here in two senses to indicate an individual with male and female sex organs or who copulates with people of both sexes. The phenomenon of bisexuality is then analysed with reference to the Greek myth of Hermaphrodite, a 'bisexual' being, born of a nymph's love for a young man of divine descent: in the guise of a fable, the myth recounts the birth of a 'monster', who raises a question-mark over the (...)
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  7. Elisabeth D. Däumer (1992). Queer Ethics; Or, The Challenge of Bisexuality to Lesbian Ethics. Hypatia 7 (4):91 - 105.
    Due to its problematic political and social position between two opposed sexual cultures, bisexuality has often been ignored by feminist and lesbian theorists both as a concept and a realm of experiences. The essay argues that bisexuality, precisely because it transgresses bipolar notions of fixed gendered and sexed identities, is usefully explored by lesbian and feminist theorists, enhancing our effort to devise an ethics of difference and to develop nonoppressive ways of responding to alterity.
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  8. Andreas De Block & Pieter Adriaens (2004). Darwinizing Sexual Ambivalence: A New Evolutionary Hypothesis of Male Homosexuality. Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):59 – 76.
    At first sight, homosexuality has little to do with reproduction. Nevertheless, many neo-Darwinian theoreticians think that human homosexuality may have had a procreative value, since it enabled the close kin of homosexuals to have more viable offspring than individuals lacking the support of homosexual siblings. In this article, however, we will defend an alternative hypothesis - originally put forward by Freud in "A phylogenetic phantasy" - namely that homosexuality evolved as a means to strengthen social bonds. Consequently, from an evolutionary (...)
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  9. W. Doniger (2005). Bisexuality in the Mythology of Ancient India. Diogenes 52 (4):50-60.
    Hindu texts call into question our own gender conceptions; they tell us that desire for bisexual pleasure and the wish to belong to both sexes at the same time are very real, but unrealizable, except by those with magic gifts. Many myths bear witness to the existential perception of human beings as bisexual and to active bisexual transformations. Some may show the desire to be androgynous and, contrary to the dominant homophobic paradigm, present veiled images of a bisexuality fulfilled in (...)
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  10. Kenneth Dover (1994). Bisexuality Eva Cantarella (CORMAC Ó CUILLEANÁIN, Tr.): Bisexuality in the Ancient World. Pp. Xii+284. New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, 1992. Cased, £19.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (01):140-141.
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  11. Lisa Heldke (1997). In Praise of Unreliability. Hypatia 12 (3):174 - 182.
    Bisexuality challenges familiar assumptions about love, family, and sexual desire that are shared by both heterosexual and homosexual communities. In particular, it challenges the assumption that a person's desire can and should run in only one direction. Furthermore, bisexuality questions the legitimacy, rigidity, and presumed ontological priority of the categories "heterosexual" and "homosexual." Bisexuals are often assumed to be dishonest and unreliable. I suggest that dishonesty and unreliability can be resources for undermining normative sexualities.
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  12. Peg O'Connor (1997). Warning! Contents Under Heterosexual Pressure. Hypatia 12 (3):183 - 188.
    This essay examines some stereotypes of bisexuals held by some lesbians. I argue that the decision that a lesbian makes not to become involved with a bisexual woman because she is bisexual can recenter men in lesbian desire, a consequence many lesbians would find deeply problematic. The acceptance of these stereotypes also results in sex becoming the defining characteristic of one's sexual orientation, thus privileging sex over any emotional, affectional, and political commitments to women.
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Heterosexuality
  1. Daryl Bem, Exotic Becomes Erotic: Explaining the Enigma of Sexual Orientation.
    In this address, I outline my “Exotic-Becomes-Erotic" theory of sexual orientation (Bem, 1996) , which provides the same basic account for both opposite-sex and same-sex erotic desire—and for both men and women. It proposes that biological variables do not code for sexual orientation per se but for childhood temperaments that influence a child’s preferences for sextypical or sex-atypical activities. These preferences lead children to feel different from opposite-sex or same-sex peers—to perceive them as “exotic.” This, in turn, produces heightened physiological (...)
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  2. Orly Benjamin (2003). The Power of Unsilencing: Between Silence and Negotiation in Heterosexual Relationships. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 33 (1):1–19.
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  3. Ann J. Cahill (2014). Recognition, Desire, and Unjust Sex. Hypatia 29 (2):303-319.
    In this article I will revisit the question of what I term the continuum of heteronormative sexual interactions, that is, the idea that purportedly ethically acceptable heterosexual interactions are conceptually, ethically, and politically associated with instances of sexual violence. Spurred by recent work by psychologist Nicola , I conclude that some of my earlier critiques of Catharine MacKinnon's theoretical linkages between sexual violence and normative heterosex are wanting. In addition, neither MacKinnon's theory nor my critique of it seem up to (...)
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  4. Joan C. Callahan, Bonnie Mann & Sara Ruddick (2007). Editors' Introduction To. Hypatia 22 (1).
  5. Joan Callahan, Bonnie Mann & Sara Ruddick (2007). Editors' Introduction to Writing Against Heterosexism. Hypatia 22 (1).
  6. Andreas De Block & Pieter Adriaens (2004). Darwinizing Sexual Ambivalence: A New Evolutionary Hypothesis of Male Homosexuality. Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):59 – 76.
    At first sight, homosexuality has little to do with reproduction. Nevertheless, many neo-Darwinian theoreticians think that human homosexuality may have had a procreative value, since it enabled the close kin of homosexuals to have more viable offspring than individuals lacking the support of homosexual siblings. In this article, however, we will defend an alternative hypothesis - originally put forward by Freud in "A phylogenetic phantasy" - namely that homosexuality evolved as a means to strengthen social bonds. Consequently, from an evolutionary (...)
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  7. Jarnes A. Gould (1988). The “Natural” and Homosexuality. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (2):51-54.
  8. Peter Higgins (2005). Sexual Disorientation: Moral Implications of Gender Norms. In Lisa Gurley, Claudia Leeb & Anna Aloisia Moser (eds.), Feminists Contest Politics and Philosophy. PIE - Peter Lang.
    This paper argues that participating exclusively or predominantly in heterosexual romantic or sexual relationships is prima facie morally impermissible. It holds that this conclusion follows from three premises: (1) gender norms are on-balance harmful; (2) conforming to harmful social norms is prima facie morally impermissible; and (3) participating exclusively or predominantly in heterosexual romantic or sexual relationships is a way of conforming to gender norms.
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  9. Sarah Lucia Hoagland (1990). Some Thoughts About Heterosexualism. Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):98-107.
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  10. Christopher Horvath (2007). Biological Explanations of Human Sexuality: The Genetic Basis of Sexual Orientation. In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
  11. Kathy Miriam (2007). Toward a Phenomenology of Sex-Right: Reviving Radical Feminist Theory of Compulsory Heterosexuality. Hypatia 22 (1):210-228.
    : In this essay, Miriam argues for a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach to the radical feminist theory of sex-right and compulsory heterosexuality. Against critics of radical feminism, she argues that when understood from a phenomenological-hermeneutic perspective, such theory does not foreclose female sexual agency. On the contrary, men's right of sexual access to women and girls is part of our background understanding of heteronormativity, and thus integral to the lived experience of female sexual agency.
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Homosexuality
  1. Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas De Block (2006). The Evolution of a Social Construction: The Case of Male Homosexuality. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (4):570-585.
  2. Annette C. Baier (1982). Caring About Caring: A Reply to Frankfurt. Synthese 53 (2):273 - 290.
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  3. Daryl Bem, Exotic Becomes Erotic: Explaining the Enigma of Sexual Orientation.
    In this address, I outline my “Exotic-Becomes-Erotic" theory of sexual orientation (Bem, 1996) , which provides the same basic account for both opposite-sex and same-sex erotic desire—and for both men and women. It proposes that biological variables do not code for sexual orientation per se but for childhood temperaments that influence a child’s preferences for sextypical or sex-atypical activities. These preferences lead children to feel different from opposite-sex or same-sex peers—to perceive them as “exotic.” This, in turn, produces heightened physiological (...)
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  4. Daryl Bem, Exotic Becomes Erotic: A Political Postscript.
    This article is a postscript to Bem's (1996) theory of sexual orientation, which claims that an individual's sexual orientation is more directly the result of childhood experiences than of inborn biological factors. The possibility that the theory provides a successful strategy for preventing gender-nonconforming children from becoming homosexual adults is considered and rejected. So, too, is the thesis that biological explanations of homosexuality are more likely than experience-based explanations to promote gay-positive attitudes and practices.
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  5. Claudia Card (1990). Review: Why Homophobia? [REVIEW] Hypatia 5 (3):110 - 117.
    Suzanne Pharr's Homophobia: A Weapon of Sexism may be an effective tool for women committed to overcoming their own homophobia who want practical advice on recognizing and eradicating it, although as an essay in theory it does not advance the issues. The author seems unaware that Celia Kitzinger has argued recently that "homophobia" is not a helpful concept because it individualizes problems better seen as political and begs the question of the rationality of the fear. I argue that "homophobia" has (...)
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  6. Andreas De Block & Pieter Adriaens (2004). Darwinizing Sexual Ambivalence: A New Evolutionary Hypothesis of Male Homosexuality. Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):59 – 76.
    At first sight, homosexuality has little to do with reproduction. Nevertheless, many neo-Darwinian theoreticians think that human homosexuality may have had a procreative value, since it enabled the close kin of homosexuals to have more viable offspring than individuals lacking the support of homosexual siblings. In this article, however, we will defend an alternative hypothesis - originally put forward by Freud in "A phylogenetic phantasy" - namely that homosexuality evolved as a means to strengthen social bonds. Consequently, from an evolutionary (...)
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  7. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2011). Transsexuality: Reconciling Christianity and Science. Toronto Journal of Theology 27 (1):51-71.
    Furthering the dialogue with J. Wentzel van Huyssteen over his way of reconciling Christianity and science while reflecting on human uniqueness, I offer a philosophical analysis of the phenomenon of transsexuality. The focus of my analysis is the implications of transsexuality for the metaphysics of reductive naturalism. Envisioning a pluralistic ontology of the sexed human body, I propose to account for human sexuality within the general framework of normative pragmatism. The context of my reflections is a theology of sexual diversity, (...)
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  8. James Gould (1994). Is Homosexuality Natural? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (2):57-58.
  9. R. W. Hierholzer (2004). Are We Ready for Sexual Reorientation Therapy in the U.S. Military? A Response to David W. Lutz. Christian Bioethics 10 (2-3):227-238.
    In his paper “The Catholic Church, the American Military, and Homosexual Reorientation Therapy,” David W. Lutz ultimately concludes that it is “appropriate, and highly ethical” for the American military to offer reorientation therapy to help homosexuals overcome “the vice of sodomy.” The major thrust of his paper, however, is to call for abandonment of the “Don't Ask/Don't Tell” policy currently in place in the military. Lutz's paper covers much ground, and this review begins by examining whether such a wide view (...)
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  10. Christopher Horvath (2007). Biological Explanations of Human Sexuality: The Genetic Basis of Sexual Orientation. In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
  11. Diane Raymond (1983). Homosexuality and Feminism. Teaching Philosophy 6 (4):355-365.
  12. Krzysztof Saja (2013). O dyskryminacji małżeństw homoseksualnych. Odpowiedź Tomaszowi Sieczkowskiemu. Diametros 37:193–209.
    My paper is a reaction to polemic of Tomasz Sieczkowski "Discrimination nonetheless. A reply to Krzysztof Saja” [ICF "Diametros" (36) 2013] that he wrote against my paper "Discrimination against same-sex couples" [ICF “Diametros" (34) 2012]. The purpose of the paper is to refute Sieczkowski’s objections that rely on wrong interpretation of the structure of my main argument. I will describe the proper course of the reasoning that I have expressed in the first article and undermine the Sieczkowski’s proposal to justify (...)
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  13. Charles Weijer, Queer Science: The Use and Abuse of Research Into Homosexuality.
Lesbianism
  1. Tangren Alexander (1992). Lesbian Slip. Hypatia 7 (4):14-30.
  2. Barbara S. Andrew (2001). Identity Without Selfhood: Bisexuality and Simone de Beauvoir (Review). Hypatia 16 (3):161-163.
  3. Cheshire Calhoun (2007). Lesbian Philosophy. In Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
  4. Cheshire Calhoun (1999). Alan Soble, Sexual Investigations:Sexual Investigations. Ethics 109 (4):928-931.
  5. Cheshire Calhoun (1996). Book Review:Lesbian Choices. Claudia Card. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (4):862-.
  6. Cheshire Calhoun (1994). Separating Lesbian Theory From Feminist Theory. Ethics 104 (3):558-581.
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  7. Mariella de Simone (2008). The 'Lesbian' Muse in Tragedy: Euripides Meλ o∏ Oioσ in Aristoph. Ra. 1301–28. Classical Quarterly 58 (02):479-.
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  8. K. J. Dover (1981). Byrne R. S. Fone (Ed.): Hidden Heritage. History and the Gay Imagination. An Anthology. Pp. Xviii + 323. New York: Avocation Publishers, N.D. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 31 (02):326-327.
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  9. Mel Duffy (2011). Lesbian Women's Experiences of Being Different in Irish Health Care. In Gill Thomson, Fiona Dykes & Soo Downe (eds.), Qualitative Research in Midwifery and Childbirth Phenomenological Approaches. Routledge.
  10. G. P. Edwards (1979). J. T. Hooker: The Language and Text of the Lesbian Poets. (Innsbrucker Beiträge Zur Sprachwissenschaft, 26.) Pp. 107. Innsbruck: Inst. Für Sprachwiss. Der Univ., 1977. Paper, 160 Öst. Sch. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 29 (02):306-.
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