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  1. Donald C. Abel (1992). Plato and Freud: Two Theories of Love. Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):193-196.
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  2. Laird Addis (1988). Dispositional Mental States: Chomsky and Freud. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 19 (1):1-17.
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  3. Salman Akhtar (ed.) (2009). Freud and the Far East: Psychoanalytic Perspectives on the People and Culture of China, Japan, and Korea. Jason Aronson.
    The contributors to the book discuss the depth-psychological concepts of amae and wa, the Ajase complex, and the filial piety complex, underscoring the ...
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  4. Graham Allen (2010). J. Hillis Miller. The Medium is the Maker: Browning, Freud, Derrida and the New Telephonic Ecotechnologies. Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2009. P/Bk. 93pp.£14.95. [REVIEW] Derrida Today 3 (2):306-310.
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  5. Matthew C. Altman & Cynthia D. Coe (2007). The Self as Creature and Creator: Fichte and Freud Against the Enlightenment. Idealistic Studies 37 (3):179-202.
    The conception of subjectivity that dominates the Western philosophical tradition, particularly during the Enlightenment, sets up a simple dichotomy: either the subject is ultimately autonomous or it is merely a causally determined thing. Fichte and Freud challenge this model by formulating theories of subjectivity thattranscend this opposition. Fichte conceives of the subject as based in absolute activity, but that activity is qualified by a check for which it is not ultimately responsible. Freud explains the behavior of the self in terms (...)
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  6. Jacqueline Michèle Ansart (1977). Hobbes Et Freud. Par Jean Roy. La Philosophie au Canada: Une Série de Monographie — 3. Halifax, Canadian Association for Publishing in Philosophy, Dalhousie University Press, 1976. 95 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 16 (01):181-183.
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  7. Robert Arp (2000). Freud's Wretched Makeshift and Scheler's Religious Act. Journal of Philosophical Research 25:405-429.
    Freud finds it impossible to accept the existence of a Supreme Being because he thinks that there is no way to scientifically demonstrate or prove the existence of a being so defined. Consequently, Freud maintains that individuals who claim to have a religious experience of God suffer from a delusion. Such individuals remain in an infantile state of neurotic denial, fooling themselves about the reality of extramental existence.In contradistinction, Max Scheler, a student of Husserlian phenomenology, can accept the existence of (...)
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  8. Richard R. Askay (1999). A Philosophical Dialogue Between Heidegger and Freud. Journal of Philosophical Research 24:415-443.
    This essay presents imaginary philosophical debates between Heidegger and Freud exploring their views on science, philosophy, their interrelationship and the fundamental philosophical presuppositions of Freud’s metapsychology. In the final section, Heidegger presents a series of criticisms of Freud’s theory, to which ‘Freud’ posthumously responds.
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  9. Paul-Laurent Assoun (2000). Freud and Nietzsche. Distributed in the U.S. By Transaction Publishers.
    Many of the leading Freudian analysts, including in the early days, Jung, Adler, Reich and Rank, attempted to link the writings of Nietzsche with the clinical ...
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  10. K. Axelos (1970). Marx, Freud, and the Undertakings of Thought in the Future. Diogenes 18 (72):96-111.
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  11. Christopher Badcock (1994). Freud's Dream: A Complete Interdisciplinary Science of Mind. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 9 (2):245-247.
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  12. D. Bakan (1986). Book Reviews : Jung's Struggle with Freud. BY GEORGE B. HOGENSON. Notre Dame: Notre Dame Press, 1983. $13.95. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 16 (3):404-406.
  13. Etienne Balibar (2006). Constructions and Deconstructions of the Universal. Critical Horizons 7 (1):21.
    This paper presents the main directions of a new research project that centres on the paradox of the enunciation of the universal. Historical experience and the history of philosophy have made us highly sceptical towards the very possibility of enunciating the universal, yet the universal can be said to have become a fact of contemporary life, and the attempt at enunciating the universal remains an inescapable demand, in politics and notably in practice. Not to enunciate the universal is impossible, but (...)
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  14. Johannes Balthasar (1988). Philosophy and Psychoanalysis. The Concept of Hermeneutics in Paul Ricoeur's Interpretation of Freud. Philosophy and History 21 (1):47-48.
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  15. James Ralph Barclay (1961). Franz Brentano and Sigmund Freud: An Unexplored Influence Relationship. [Pocatello]Idaho State College.
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  16. G. William Barnard (2005). Pt. 3. James and Mysticism. For an Engaged Reading : William James and the Varieties of Postmodern Religious Experience / Grace M. Jantzen ; Asian Religions and Mysticism : The Legacy of William James in the Study of Religions / Richard King ; James and Freud on Mysticism / Robert A. Segal ; Mystical Assessments : Jamesian Reflections on Spiritual Judgments. [REVIEW] In Jeremy R. Carrette (ed.), William James and the Varieties of Religious Experience: A Centenary Celebration. Routledge.
  17. J. A. Barnes (1959). Anthropology After Freud. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):14 – 27.
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  18. Samuel Barondes (2009). After Locke : Darwin, Freud, and Psychiatric Assessment. In Debra J. H. Mathews, Hilary Bok & Peter V. Rabins (eds.), Personal Identity and Fractured Selves: Perspectives From Philosophy, Ethics, and Neuroscience. Johns Hopkins University Press.
  19. Pierluigi Barrotta, Anna Laura Lepschy & Emma Bond (eds.) (2008). Freud and Italian Culture. Peter Lang.
    This book explores the different ways in which psychoanalysis has been connected to various fields of Italian culture, such as literary criticism, philosophy ...
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  20. Debra Berghoffen (2001). Menage à Trois: Freud, Beauvoir, and the Marquis de Sade. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 34 (2):151-163.
    Without rejecting Simone de Beauvoir's often cited feminist agenda, this paper takes up her less frequently noted insight – that woman's existence as the inessential other is more than a consequence of material dependency, and political inequality. This insight traces women's subordinated status to the effect of a patriarchal desire that produces and is sustained by a political imaginary that is not economically grounded and is not undermined by women's economic or political progress. Taking up this insight, this paper reads (...)
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  21. Rudolf Bernet (2002). Unconscious Consciousness in Husserl and Freud. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):327-351.
    A clarification of Husserl's changing conceptions of imaginary consciousness ( phantasy ) and memory, especially at the level of auto-affective time-consciousness, suggests an interpretation of Freud's concept of the Unconscious. Phenomenology of consciousness can show how it is possible that consciousness can bring to present appearance something unconscious, that is, something foreign or absent to consciousness, without incorporating it into or subordinating it to the conscious present. This phenomenological analysis of Freud's concept of the Unconscious leads to a partial critique (...)
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  22. Rudolf Bernet (1994). Derrida-Husserl-Freud: The Trace of Transference. Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (S1):141-158.
  23. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Aggadic Moses: Spinoza and Freud on the Traumatic Legacy of Theological-Political Identity. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):3-21.
    This paper attempts to explore the problem of collective identity and its subsequent historical legacies through a reading of Spinoza’s and Freud’s respective accounts of Moses. In working their way through the aggadah (i.e., legend) of Moses, both Spinoza and Freud find the halakhic (i.e., legal) core of collectivity to be expressed in and as social mediation. Moreover, both thinkers discover that the occlusion of this core leads to a collective trauma (in Freud’s sense), the symptom of which is the (...)
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  24. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2008). Aggadic Moses. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):3-21.
    This paper attempts to explore the problem of collective identity and its subsequent historical legacies through a reading of Spinoza’s and Freud’s respective accounts of Moses. In working their way through the aggadah (i.e., legend) of Moses, both Spinoza and Freud find the halakhic (i.e., legal) core of collectivity to be expressed in and as social mediation. Moreover, both thinkers discover that the occlusion of this core leads to a collective trauma (in Freud’s sense), the symptom of which is the (...)
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  25. Richard J. Bernstein (2013). Ricœur's Freud. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 4 (1):130-139.
    Ricoeur’s reading of Freud is one of the most comprehensive, perceptive and judicious explications of Freudianism—one that begins with his early “Project” of 1895 and culminates with the last book that Freud published, Moses and Monotheism. Ricoeur is successful in exposing some of the weaknesses in Freud, and even more importantly, why we need to move beyond Freud. I am deeply sympathetic with his claim that there is a dialectical relationship between a hermeneutics of suspicion and a restorative hermeneutics of (...)
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  26. Daniel Berthold-Bond (1989). Freud's Critique of Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 20 (3-4):274-294.
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  27. Richard Bilsker (1997). Freud and Schopenhauer. Idealistic Studies 27 (1/2):79-90.
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  28. Paul Bishop (2003). Analysis or Synthesis? A Cassirerian Problem in the Work of Freud and Jung. In Paul Bishop & R. H. Stephenson (eds.), Cultural Studies and the Symbolic: Occasional Papers in Cassirer and Cultural Theory Studies, Presented at the University of Glasgow's Centre for Intercultural Studies. Northern Universities Press.
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  29. L. Bisin (2008). FS TRINCIA, Husserl, Freud e il problema dell'inconscio. Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 100 (4):692.
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  30. Andreas Blocdek (2005). Freud as an 'Evolutionary Psychiatrist' and the Foundations of a Freudian Philosophy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (4):315-324.
  31. Richard Boothby (2001). Freud as Philosopher: Metapsychology After Lacan. Routledge.
    Using Jacques Lacan's work as a key, this groundbreaking work reassesses the philosophical significance of Freud's most ambitious general theory of mental functioning: metapsychology. Richard Boothby forcefully argues that this theory has been misunderstood, and that therefore Freud's impact on philosophy has been unjustly muted. Freud as Philosopher illuminates in a fresh and newly accessible way the central points of Freud's metapsychology-including the guiding metaphor of psychical energy and the final, enigmatic theory of the twin drives of life and death-through (...)
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  32. Robert F. Bornstein & Joseph M. Masling (eds.) (1998). Empirical Perspectives on the Psychoanalytic Unconscious. American Psychological Association.
  33. Gregory Boudreaux (1977). Freud on the Nature of Unconscious Mental Processes. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 7 (March):1-32.
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  34. J. Bouveresse (1995). Wittgenstein Reads Freud: The Myth of the Unconscious. Princeton University Press.
    Did Freud present a scientific hypothesis about the unconscious, as he always maintained and as many of his disciples keep repeating? This question has long prompted debates concerning the legitimacy and usefulness of psychoanalysis, and it is of utmost importance to Lacanian analysts, whose main project has been to stress Freud's scientific grounding. Here Jacques Bouveresse, a noted authority on Ludwig Wittgenstein, contributes to the debate by turning to this Austrian-born philosopher and contemporary of Freud for a candid assessment of (...)
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  35. L. E. Braddock (2006). Psychoanalysis as Functionalist Social Science: The Legacy of Freud's 'Project for a Scientific Psychology'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (3):394-413.
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  36. G. S. Brett (1939). Aquinas, Hollywood, and Freud. Ethics 49 (2):204-211.
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  37. G. S. Brett (1931). Book Review:Freud and His Time. Fritz Wittels. [REVIEW] Ethics 42 (1):23-.
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  38. Claude Brodeur (1981). Freud et le Problème de la Culpabilité. Par Ghyslain Charron. Ottawa: Editions de l'Université d'Ottawa. 1979. Dialogue 20 (01):149-152.
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  39. Somer Brodribb (1992). Nothing Mat(T)Ers: A Feminist Critique of Postmodernism. Spinifex Press.
    "An eloquent work. Somer Brodribb not only gives us a feminist critique of postmodernism with its masculinist predeterminants in existentialism, its Freudian footholdings and its Sadean values, but in the very form and texture of the critique, she literally creates new discourse in feminist theory. Brodribb has transcended not only postmodernism but its requirement that we speak in its voice even when criticizing it. She creates a language that is at once poetic and powerfully analytical. Her insistent and compelling radical (...)
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  40. Andrew Brook (1998). Neuroscience Versus Psychology in Freud. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 843 (1):66-79.
    In the 1890's, Freud attempted to lay out the foundations of a complete, interdisciplinary neuroscience of the mind. The conference that gave rise to this collection of papers, Neuroscience of the Mind on the Centennial of Freud's Project for a Scientific Psychology, celebrated the centrepiece of this work, the famous Project (1895a). Freud never published this work and by 1896 or 1897 he had abandoned the research programme behind it. As he announced in the famous Ch. VII of The Interpretation (...)
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  41. J. F. Brown (1934). Freud and the Scientific Method. Philosophy of Science 1 (3):323-337.
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  42. Gerald L. Bruns (1974). Freud, Structuralism, and "the Moses of Michelangelo". Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (1):13-18.
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  43. Daniel Burston (1987). Review of Psychoanalysis: Freud's Cognitive Psychology. [REVIEW] Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 7 (2):124-129.
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  44. Clark Butler (1976). Hegel and Freud: A Comparison. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (4):506-522.
    This article compares Freud and Hegel, arguing that Freud independently uncovered and used the Hegelian dialectical method. It is argued that Freud used the method in reconstructing the psycho-sexual development of the individual begining with sense-certainty in the Phenomenology of Spirit and proceeding through the dialectic of self-consciousness. The development in prehistory from food-gathering (oral assimilative stage) through hunting (anal aggressive stage), the pastoral and agricultural stages (lordship and bondage) to the city state (stoici stage), is briefly presented. This article (...)
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  45. Alex Calder (1988). Chance and the Text of Experience: Freud, Nietzsche, and Shakespeare's Hamlet (Review). Philosophy and Literature 12 (1):136-138.
  46. David Carr (1987). Freud and Sexual Ethics. Philosophy 62 (241):361 - 373.
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  47. H. Wildon Carr (1914). The Philosophical Aspect of Freud's Theory of Dream Interpretation. Mind 23 (91):321-334.
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  48. Edward Casey (1978). The Image/Sign Relation in Husserl and Freud. In. In Ronald Bruzina & Bruce W. Wilshire (eds.), Crosscurrents in Phenomenology. Martinus Nijhoff. 120--143.
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  49. Marcia Cavell (1994). Book Review:The Cambridge Companion to Freud. Jerome Neu. [REVIEW] Ethics 104 (4):902-.
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  50. Marcia Cavell (1993). The Psychoanalytic Mind: From Freud to Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
    Cavell elaborates the view, traceable from Wittgenstein to Davidson, that there is no thought, and thus no meaning, without language, and shows how this concurs ...
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