This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
48 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Fred Adams & Robert Stecker (1994). Vacuous Singular Terms. Mind and Language 9 (4):387-401.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. István Aranyosi (2012). Talking About Nothing. Numbers, Hallucinations, and Fictions. Philosophy 87 (1):145-150.
    If everything exists, then it looks, prima facie, as if talking about nothing is equivalent to not talking about anything. However, we appear as talking or thinking about particular nothings, that is, about particular items that are not among the existents. How to explain this phenomenon? One way is to deny that everything exists, and consequently to be ontologically committed to nonexistent “objects”. Another way is to deny that the process of thinking about such nonexistents is a genuine singular thought. (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ermanno Bencivenga (1980). Truth, Correspondence, and Non-Denoting Singular Terms. Philosophia 9 (2):219-229.
    The correspondence theory of truth provides standard semantics with a simple scheme for evaluating sentences. This scheme however depends on the existence of basic correspondences between singular terms and objects, And thus breaks down in the case of non-Denoting singular terms. An alternative to the correspondence theory is thus called for in dealing with such terms. The author criticizes various positions discussed in the literature in this regard, And then presents a solution of his own.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Emma Borg (2001). The Metaphysics and Epistemology of Singular Terms. Philosophical Papers 30 (1):1-30.
    Abstract Can we draw apart questions of what it is to be a singular term (a metaphysical issue) from questions about how we tell when some expression is a singular term (an epistemological matter)? Prima facie, it might seem we can't: language, as a man-made edifice, might seem to prohibit such a distinction, and, indeed, some popular accounts of the semantics of singular terms make such an assumption. In this paper, however, I argue for a different kind of approach, one (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Robert B. Brandom (1987). Singular Terms and Sentential Sign Designs. Philosophical Topics 15 (1):125-167.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Tyler Burge (1974). Truth and Singular Terms. Noûs 8 (4):309-325.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Lauchlan Chipman (1982). Existence, Reference, and Definite Singular Terms. Mind 91 (361):96-101.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ronald L. Chrisley, Singular Terms and Reference: Evans and "Julius&Quot.
    used) (Evans 1982: 31). He dubbed these terms "descriptive names"1, and used them as a foil against which to test several theories of reference: Frege's, Russell's, and his own.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Monte Cook (1979). Singular Terms and Rigid Designators. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):157-162.
  10. Eros Corazza (2003). Complex Demonstratives Qua Singular Terms. Erkenntnis 59 (2):263 - 283.
    In a recent book, Jeffrey King (King 2001) argues that complexdemonstratives, i.e., noun phrases of the form `this/that F, are not singular terms. As such,they are not devices of direct reference contributing the referent to the proposition expressed.In this essay I challenge King's position and show how a direct reference view can handle the datahe proposes in favor of the quantificational account. I argue that when a complex demonstrativecannot be interpreted as a singular term, it is best understood as a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Michael Devitt (1980). Brian Loar on Singular Terms. Philosophical Studies 37 (3):271 - 280.
    In "the semantics of singular terms," brian loar described and criticized a "causal" theory of reference and offered a new "description" theory. It is argued that the particular causal theory described is not to be found in the papers by donnellan and kripke cited as evidence for it, And is a straw man. Further "prima facie", Loar's new description theory fails to meet kripke's noncircularity condition. Should loar attempt to meet it, His theory is likely to run foul of kripke's (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Michael Devitt (1974). Singular Terms. Journal of Philosophy 71 (7):183-205.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. George Englebretsen (1980). Singular Terms and the Syllogistic. New Scholasticism 54 (1):68-74.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Noel Fleming (1958). A Language Without Singular Terms. Mind 67 (265):97-99.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Peter J. Graham (1999). Brandom on Singular Terms. Philosophical Studies 93 (3):247-264.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Richard E. Grandy (1977). Predication and Singular Terms. Noûs 11 (2):163-167.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. William J. Greenberg (1985). Aspects of a Theory of Singular Reference: Prolegomena to a Dialectical Logic of Singular Terms. Garland Pub..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Bob Hale (1979). Strawson, Geach and Dummett on Singular Terms and Predicates. Synthese 42 (2):275 - 295.
    In the opening chapter of Subject and Predicate in Logic and Grammar, [1] Professor Strawson develops an explanation of the subjectpredicate distinction on the basis of a supposedly more fundamental distinction or contrast between, on the one hand, spatio-temporal particulars and, on the other, general concepts applicable to such particulars. At a basic level, he argues, these contrasted items occupy a central position in our thought about the world. They form the constituents of a fundamental type of judgment about the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Richard Heck, What Is a Singular Term?
    This paper discusses the question whether it is possible to explain the notion of a singular term without invoking the notion of an object or other ontological notions. The framework here is that of Michael Dummett's discussion in Frege: Philosophy of Language. I offer an emended version of Dummett's conditions, accepting but modifying some suggestions made by Bob Hale, and defend the emended conditions against some objections due to Crispin Wright. This paper dates from about 1989. It originally formed part (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Thomas Hofweber (2007). Innocent Statements and Their Metaphysically Loaded Counterparts. Philosophers' Imprint 7 (1):1-33.
    One puzzling feature of talk about properties, propositions and natural numbers is that statements that are explicitly about them can be introduced apparently without change of truth conditions from statements that don't mention them at all. Thus it seems that the existence of numbers, properties and propositions can be established`from nothing'. This metaphysical puzzle is tied to a series of syntactic and semantic puzzles about the relationship between ordinary, metaphysically innocent statements and their metaphysically loaded counterparts, statements that explicitly mention (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. C. A. Hooker (1970). Demonstratives, Definite Descriptions and the Elimination of Singular Terms. Journal of Philosophy 67 (22):951-961.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jennifer Hornsby (1977). Singular Terms in Contexts of Propositional Attitude. Mind 86 (341):31-48.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. John Justice (2007). Unified Semantics of Singular Terms. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (228):363–373.
    Singular-term semantics has been intractable. Frege took the referents of singular terms to be their semantic values. On his account, vacuous terms lacked values. Russell separated the semantics of definite descriptions from the semantics of proper names, which caused truth-values to be composed in two different ways and still left vacuous names without values. Montague gave all noun phrases sets of verb-phrase extensions for values, which created type mismatches when noun phrases were objects and still left vacuous names without values. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. MB Kac (1997). The Proper Treatment of Singular Terms in Ordinary English. Mind 106 (424):661-696.
    A free logical analysis of singular terms couched in terms of the semantic theory of Keenan and Faltz (1985) is shown to avoid problems with both Frege's and Russell's treatments. At its heart is the proposal of Keenan and Faltz to reverse the usual mode-theoretic conception of individuals and properties, taking the latter as primitive and the former as derived therefrom. A simple extension of the notion 'property' is then shown to enable a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Toomas Karmo (1985). Are Singular Terms Needed for Describing the World? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 63 (4):419 – 427.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jeffrey C. King (2006). Singular Terms, Reference and Methodology in Semantics. Philosophical Issues 16 (1):141–161.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Karel Lambert (1959). Singular Terms and Truth. Philosophical Studies 10 (1):1 - 5.
    A 'free logic' for singular terms with restrictions on existential generalization and universal instantiation is set out and argued for. Weaker logics, Such as lambert's fd and fd1 are held incapable of proving instances of tarski's truth schema for languages containing non-Denoting terms. Stronger logics, Such as scott's and lambert's fd2, Are held to yield false theorems when given natural interpretations. The logic defended conforms essentially to russell's semantical intuitions. Some consequences are drawn for the theory of identity.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Hugues Leblanc & Theodore Hailperin (1959). Nondesignating Singular Terms. Philosophical Review 68 (2):239-243.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Brian Loar (1976). The Semantics of Singular Terms. Philosophical Studies 30 (6):353 - 377.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Dan López de Sa (2007). On the Semantic Indecision of Vague Singular Terms. Sorites 19:88-91.
    Donald Smith (2006) argues that if ‘I’ is indeed vague, and the view of vagueness as semantic indecision correct after all, then ‘I’ cannot refer to a composite material object. But his considerations would, if sound, also establish that ‘Tibbles,’ ‘Everest,’ or ‘Toronto,’ do not refer to composite material objects either—nor hence, presumably, to cats, mountains, or cities. And they can be resisted, anyway. Or so I argue.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Gordon Matheson (1962). The Semantics of Singular Terms. Journal of Symbolic Logic 27 (4):439-466.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. T. Parent, Paradox with Just Self-Reference.
    If a semantically open language allows self-reference, one can show there is a predicate which is both satisfied and unsatisfied by a self-referring term. The argument requires something akin to diagonalization on substitution-instances of a definition-scheme (*): ‘x is Lagadonian iff in the nth substitution-instance of (*), the initial variable is replaced with x’. Given an appropriate enumeration of the instances, a self-referring term is counted as “Lagadonian” if the initial variable in (*) is replaced with the term itself. But (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Francis Jeffry Pelletier & Bernard Linsky (2009). Russell Vs. Frege on Definite Descriptions as Singular Terms. In Nicholas Griffin & Dale Jacquette (eds.), Russell Vs. Meinong: The Legacy of "on Denoting". Routledge.
    In ‘On Denoting’ and to some extent in ‘Review of Meinong and Others, Untersuchungen zur Gegenstandstheorie und Psychologie’, published in the same issue of Mind (Russell, 1905a,b), Russell presents not only his famous elimination (or contextual defi nition) of defi nite descriptions, but also a series of considerations against understanding defi nite descriptions as singular terms. At the end of ‘On Denoting’, Russell believes he has shown that all the theories that do treat defi nite descriptions as singular terms fall (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Andrew P. Rebera (2009). The Gray's Elegy Argument: Denoting Concepts, Singular Terms, and Truth-Value Dependence. Prolegomena 8 (2):207-232.
    In the notoriously obscure “Gray’s Elegy Argument” (GEA) of “On Denoting”, Russell argues against the theory of denoting concepts which he had set out in his earlier work The Principles of Mathematics (PoM). Nathan Salmon has argued that the GEA is intended to demonstrate the falsity of the thesis that definite descriptions are singular terms, a view which he attributes to the Russell of PoM. In a similar vein, Peter Hylton has argued that we can make sense of the GEA (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ian Rumfitt (2003). Singular Terms and Arithmetical Logicism. Philosophical Books 44 (3):193--219.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. David S. Schwarz (1979). Naming and Referring: The Semantics and Pragmatics of Singular Terms. De Gruyter.
    I. Introduction As I sketched in my Preface, what frames this discussion is the opposition between the conceptual and the objective approaches to the ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. David S. Schwarz (1976). Referring, Singular Terms, and Presupposition. Philosophical Studies 30 (1):63 - 74.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Barry Smith (1984). How Not To Talk About What Does Not Exist. In Rudolf Haller (ed.), Aesthetics. Hölder-Pichler-Tempsky.
    Defends a view of intentional directedness according to which those seemingly object-directed acts – involved for example in reading works of fiction – which lack existing objects as targets, are not intentional (thus: not directed towards any object). Rather, each such act seems to its subject as if it were so directed because it is associated with a belief of a certain special sort, whose intentional directedness is not towards any putative external object but rather towards the very act itself (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Paul Vincent Spade (1997). Walter Burley on the Simple Supposition of Singular Terms. Topoi 16 (1):7-13.
    This paper argues that Burley's theory of simple supposition is not as it has usually been presented. The prevailing view is that Burley and other authors agreed that simple supposition was in every case supposition for a universal, and that the disagreement over simple supposition between, say, Ockham and Burley was merely a disagreement over what a universal was (a piece of the ontology? a concept?), combined with a separate disagreement over what terms signify (the speaker's thoughts? the objects the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. William Stirton, Ontological Commitment by Singular Terms.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. P. F. Strawson (1968). Singular Terms and Predication. Synthese 19 (1-2):393-412.
    The aim is to uncover the foundations of quine's distinction between definite singular terms and general terms in predicative position, And hence of the general schema of predication, 'fx'. While each term in such a predication specifies its own item, The items so specified exhibit a typical difference exemplified in the basic case by the difference between spatio-Temporal particulars and properties of such particulars. A generally consequential difference of role is that while both terms are applied to the item of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. P. F. Strawson (1961). Singular Terms and Predication. Journal of Philosophy 58 (15):393-412.
    The aim is to uncover the foundations of quine's distinction between definite singular terms and general terms in predicative position, And hence of the general schema of predication, 'fx'. While each term in such a predication specifies its own item, The items so specified exhibit a typical difference exemplified in the basic case by the difference between spatio-Temporal particulars and properties of such particulars. A generally consequential difference of role is that while both terms are applied to the item of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. P. F. Strawson (1956). Singular Terms, Ontology and Identity. Mind 65 (260):433-454.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Manley Thompson (1959). On the Elimination of Singular Terms. Mind 68 (271):361-376.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. James E. Tomberlin (1993). Singular Terms, Quantification, and Ontology I. Philosophical Issues 4:297-309.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Rafal Urbaniak (2009). Bogus Singular Terms and Substitution Salva Denotatione. The Reasoner 3.
    This is the third installment of a paper which deals with comparison and evaluation of the standard slingshot argument (for the claim that all true sentences, if they refer, refer to the same object) with the doxastic formulation.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Bas C. van Fraassen (1966). Singular Terms, Truth-Value Gaps, and Free Logic. Journal of Philosophy 63 (17):481-495.
  48. Linda Wetzel (1990). Dummett's Criteria for Singular Terms. Mind 99 (394):239-254.
    In his excellent book Frege: Philosophy of Language, Michael Dummett proposes five criteria that are supposed to delimit formally the class of singular terms (in Frege's terminology, 'proper names'). I shall argue that Dummett's criteria, even as amended by Crispin Wright and Bob Hale, do not delimit the class of singular terms in English, that further refinements of the criteria probably will not help, and that in any event the criteria face other difficulties.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation