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  1. Grant Allen (1881). Sight and Smell in Vertebrates. Mind 6 (24):453-471.
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  2. Uri Almagor (1990). Odors and Private Language: Observations on the Phenomenology of Scent. [REVIEW] Human Studies 13 (3):253-274.
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  3. Clare Batty (2011). Smelling Lessons. Philosophical Studies 153 (Mar.):161-174.
    Much of the philosophical work on perception has focused on vision. Recently, however, philosophers have begun to correct this ‘tunnel vision’ by considering other modalities. Nevertheless, relatively little has been written about the chemical senses—olfaction and gustation. The focus of this paper is olfaction. In this paper, I consider the question: does human olfactory experience represents objects as thus and so? If we take visual experience as the paradigm of how experience can achieve object representation, we might think that the (...)
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  4. Clare Batty (2010). A Representational Account of Olfactory Experience. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):511-538.
    Much of the philosophical work on perception has focused on vision, with very little discussion of the chemical senses—olfaction and gustation. In this paper, I consider the challenge that olfactory experience presents to upholding a representational view of the sense modalities. Given the phenomenology of olfactory experience, it is difficult to see what a representational view of it would be like. Olfaction, then, presents an important challenge for representational theories to overcome. In this paper, I take on this challenge and (...)
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  5. Clare Batty (2010). Olfactory Experience II: Objects and Properties. Philosophy Compass 5 (12):1147-1156.
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  6. Clare Batty (2010). Olfactory Experience I: The Content of Olfactory Experience. Philosophy Compass 5 (12):1137-1146.
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  7. Clare Batty (2010). Scents and Sensibilia. American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):103-118.
    This paper considers what olfactory experience can tell us about the controversy over qualia and, in particular, the debate that focuses on the alleged transparency of experience. The appeal to transparency is supposed to show that there are no qualia—intrinsic, non-intentional and directly accessible properties of experience that determine phenomenal character. It is most commonly used to motivate intentionalism—namely, the view that the phenomenal character of an experience is exhausted by its representational content. Although some philosophers claim that transparency holds (...)
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  8. Clare Batty (2010). What the Nose Doesn't Know: Non-Veridicality and Olfactory Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (3-4):10-17.
    We can learn much about perceptual experience by thinking about how it can mislead us. In this paper, I explore whether, and how, olfactory experience can mislead. I argue that, in the case of olfactory experience, the traditional distinction between illusion and hallucination does not apply. Integral to the traditional distinction is a notion of ‘object-failure’—the failure of an experience to present objects accurately. I argue that there are no such presented objects in olfactory experience. As a result, olfactory experience (...)
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  9. Clare Batty (2009). What's That Smell? Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):321-348.
    In philosophical discussions of the secondary qualities, color has taken center stage. Smells, tastes, sounds, and feels have been treated, by and large, as mere accessories to colors. We are, as it is said, visual creatures. This, at least, has been the working assumption in the philosophy of perception and in those metaphysical discussions about the nature of the secondary qualities. The result has been a scarcity of work on the “other” secondary qualities. In this paper, I take smells and (...)
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  10. Nalini Bhushan & Stuart Rosenfeld (eds.) (2000). Of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. New York: Oxford University Press.
    The essays, written by both chemists and philosophers, adopt distinctive philosophical perspectives on chemistry and collectively offer both a conceptualization ...
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  11. Neil Campbell (1996). Aquinas' Reasons for the Aesthetic Irrelevance of Tastes and Smells. British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (2):166-176.
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  12. Francis J. Coleman (1965). Can a Smell or a Taste or a Touch Be Beautiful? American Philosophical Quarterly 2 (4):319 - 324.
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  13. Ed Cooke & Erik Myin (2011). Is Trilled Smell Possible? How the Structure of Olfaction Determines the Phenomenology of Smell. Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (11-12):59-95.
    Smell 'sensations' are among the most mysterious of conscious experiences, and have been cited in defense of the thesis that the character of perceptual experience is independent of the physical events that seem to give rise to it. Here we review the scientific literature on olfaction, and we argue that olfaction has a distinctive profile in relation to the other modalities, on four counts: in the physical nature of the stimulus, in the sensorimotor interactions that characterize its use, in the (...)
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  14. Lara Feigel (2009). The Unfilmable Sense? The Philosophers' Magazine 45 (45):57-62.
    The sensation of smell at its most powerful is more about a peculiarly immediate kind of intellectual association than about pure sensory delight or horror. The most evocative odours resonate with other fragrances in our individual smell vocabulary, and film as a medium is equal to literature in capturing the more peculiar or unconscious workings of the mind. Indeed, this seems to be what cinema does most naturally; it is better placed than literature to make effortless subliminal connections.
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  15. Chantal Jaquet (2010). Philosophie de L'Odorat. Presses Universitaires de France.
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  16. Thomas K. Johansen (1996). Aristotle on the Sense of Smell. Phronesis 41 (1):1-19.
  17. Mark A. Johnstone (2012). Aristotle on Odour and Smell. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 43:143-83.
    The sense of smell occupies a peculiar intermediate position within Aristotle's theory of sense perception: odours, like colours and sounds, are perceived at a distance through an external medium of air or water; yet in their nature they are intimately related to flavours, the proper objects of taste, which for Aristotle is a form of touch. In this paper, I examine Aristotle's claims about odour and smell, especially in De Anima II.9 and De Sensu 5, to see what light they (...)
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  18. Eric B. Keverne (2002). The Nature of Smell. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (2):281-286.
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  19. Francis Lions (1929). Odour. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 7 (4):286 – 293.
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  20. Donald McQueen (1993). Aquinas on the Aesthetic Relevance of Tastes and Smells. British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (4):346-356.
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  21. Vivian Mizrahi (2013). Sniff, Smell, and Stuff. Philosophical Studies:1-18.
    Most philosophers consider olfactory experiences to be very poor in comparison to other sense modalities. And because olfactory experiences seem to lack the spatial content necessary to object perception, philosophers tend to maintain that smell is purely sensational or abstract. I argue in this paper that the apparent poverty and spatial indeterminateness of odor experiences does not reflect the “subjective” or “abstract” nature of smell, but only that smell is not directed to particular things. According to the view defended in (...)
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  22. Christopher Mole (2010). The Contents of Olfactory Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (11-12):173-79.
    Clare Batty has recently argued that the content of human olfactory experience is 'a very weak kind of abstract, or existentially quantified content', and so that 'there is no way things smell'. Her arguments are based on two claims. Firstly, that there is no intuitive distinction between olfactory hallucination and olfactory illusion. Secondly, that olfaction 'does not present smell at particular locations', and 'seems disengaged from any particular object'. The present article shows both of these claims to be false. It (...)
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  23. Thomas H. Morton (2000). Archiving Odors. In Bhushan & Rosenfeld (eds.), Of Minds and Molecules: New Philosophical Perspectives on Chemistry. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  24. Harold Osborne (1977). Odours and Appreciation. British Journal of Aesthetics 17 (1):37-48.
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  25. Daniel Press & Steven C. Minta (2000). The Smell of Nature: Olfaction, Knowledge and the Environment. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (2):173 – 186.
    Olfaction offers unique entry into the non-human world, but Western culture constrains such opportunities because of the dominance of the visual mode of perception. We begin by briefly reviewing philosophical arguments against olfaction as a reliable cognitive input. We then build a biological case for the similarity of non-human and human olfaction. Subsequently, we argue that some contemporary societies still make use of olfaction for organizing themselves in space and time. We end by suggesting that olfaction offers promise for advancing (...)
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  26. Jake Quilty-Dunn (2013). Reid on Olfaction and Secondary Qualities. Frontiers in Psychology 4:974.
    Thomas Reid is one of the primary early expositors of the "dual-component" theory of perception, according to which conscious perception constitutively involves a non-intentional sensation accompanied by a noninferential perceptual belief. In this paper, I will explore Reid's account of olfactory perception, and of odor as a secondary quality. Reid is often taken to endorse a broadly Lockean picture of secondary qualities, according to which they are simply dispositions to cause sensations. This picture creates problems, however, for Reid's account of (...)
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  27. Louise Richardson (2013). Flavour, Taste and Smell. Mind and Language 28 (3):322-341.
    I consider the role of psychology and other sciences in telling us about our senses, via the issue of whether empirical findings show us that flavours are perceived partly with the sense of smell. I argue that scientific findings do not establish that we're wrong to think that flavours are just tasted. Non-naturalism, according to which our everyday conception of the senses does not involve empirical commitments of a kind that could be corrected by empirical findings is, I suggest, a (...)
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  28. Louise Richardson (2013). Sniffing and Smelling. Philosophical Studies 162 (2):401-419.
    In this paper I argue that olfactory experience, like visual experience, is exteroceptive: it seems to one that odours, when one smells them, are external to the body, as it seems to one that objects are external to the body when one sees them. Where the sense of smell has been discussed by philosophers, it has often been supposed to be non-exteroceptive. The strangeness of this philosophical orthodoxy makes it natural to ask what would lead to its widespread acceptance. I (...)
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  29. Louise Richardson, Fiona Macpherson, Mohan Matthen & Matthew Nudds, Symposium on Louise Richardson’s “Flavour, Taste and Smell”. Mind and Language Symposia at Brains.
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  30. Gary E. Schwartz (2000). Individual Differences in Subtle Awareness and Levels of Awareness: Olfaction as a Model System. In Robert G. Kunzendorf & B. Alan Wallace (eds.), Individual Differences in Conscious Experience. John Benjamins. 209.
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  31. R. W. Sharples (1993). Smells and Odours. The Classical Review 43 (01):28-.
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  32. Richard J. Stevenson (2009). Phenomenal and Access Consciousness in Olfaction. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):1004-1017.
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  33. Marta Tafalla (2013). Anosmic Aesthetics. Estetika 50 (1):53-80.
    Anosmia is a sensory disability that consists of the inability to perceive odours. The sense of smell can be lost at any time during life, but people suffering from congenital anosmia, as I do, have never had any experience of smelling. My question is whether such an impairment of olfaction impoverishes aesthetic appreciation or makes it different in any way. I hypothesize that congenital anosmia entails two different kinds of loss in aesthetic appreciation. In order to test my hypothesis, I (...)
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  34. Benjamin D. Young (2014). Smelling Phenomenal. Frontiers in Psychology 5 (713):doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00713.
    Qualitative-consciousness arises at the sensory level of olfactory processing and pervades our experience of smells to the extent that qualitative character is maintained whenever we are aware of undergoing an olfactory experience. Building upon the distinction between Access and Phenomenal Consciousness the paper offers a nuanced distinction between Awareness and Qualitative-consciousness that is applicable to olfaction in a manner that is conceptual precise and empirically viable. Mounting empirical research is offered substantiating the applicability of the distinction to olfaction and showing (...)
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  35. Benjamin D. Young (2012). Stinking Consciousness! Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (3-4):223-243.
    Contemporary neuroscientific theories of consciousness are typically based on the study of vision and have neglected olfaction. Several of these (e.g. Global Workspace Theories, the Information Integration theory, and the various theories offered by Crick and Koch) claim that a thalamic relay is necessary for consciousness. Studies on olfaction and the olfactory system's anatomical structure show this claim to be incorrect, thus showing these theories to be either false or inadequate as general and comprehensive accounts of consciousness. Attempts to rescue (...)
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  36. Benjamin D. Young, Andreas Keller & David Rosenthal (2014). Quality-Space Theory in Olfaction. Frontiers in Psychology:doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00001.
    Quality-space theory (QST) explains the nature of the mental qualities distinctive of perceptual states by appeal to their role in perceiving. QST is typically described in terms of the mental qualities that pertain to color. Here we apply QST to the olfactory modalities. Olfaction is in various respects more complex than vision, and so provides a useful test case for QST. To determine whether QST can deal with the challenges olfaction presents, we show how a quality space could be constructed (...)
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  37. Tzachi Zamir (2004). The Sense of Smell: Morality and Rhetoric in the Bramhall-Hobbes Controversy. Sophia 43 (2):49-61.
    Olfactoric imagery is abundantly employed in the Bramhall-Hobbes controversy. I survey some examples and then turn to the possible significance of this. I argue that by forcing Hobbes into the figurative exchange Bramhall scores points in terms of moving the controversy into ground that is not covered by the limited view of rationality that Hobbes is committed to according to his rhetoric (at least as Bramhall perceives it). Bramhall clearly wants to move from cool argument to a more affluent rhetorical (...)
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