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  1. Mengistu Amberber (ed.) (2007). The Language of Memory in a Cross-Linguistic Perspective. John Benjamins.
    ... volume explores the language of memory in a cross-linguistic perspective. The term memory is to be understood broadly as the "capacity to encode, store, ...
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  2. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2005). Memory, Identity, and Cultural Authority. Social Philosophy Today 21:249-252.
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  3. Vera Apfelthaler & Julia B. Köhne (2007). Introduction : Memory, Media, Gender, and Transgressions in/Via Film and Theater. In Vera Apfelthaler & Julia Köhne (eds.), Gendered Memories: Transgressions in German and Israeli Film and Theatre. Turia + Kant.
  4. Maurice Apprey (2001). Fieldnotes on Staging and Transforming Historical Grievances: From Cultural Memory to a Reconstructable Future. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 32 (1):71-83.
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  5. Maurice Aymard (2004). History and Memory: Construction, Deconstruction and Reconstruction. Diogenes 51 (1):7-16.
    Memory is currently an important concern for our societies, as well as for the social and human sciences. This article discusses aspects of memory and history. Never have memory’s tools been more powerful or more efficient, yet never has the relationship between history and memory seemed more uncertain. History has lost its monopoly over the production and conservation of memory; memory has developed independently and is inspiring new partners, for example in science and literature.
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  6. Siyaves Azeri (2013). Hume's Social Theory of Memory. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):53-68.
    Traditionally, Hume's account of memory is considered an individualist-atomic representational theory. However, textual evidence suggests that Hume's account is better seen as a first attempt to create a social theory of memory that considers social context, custom and habits, language, and logical structures as constitutive elements of memory.
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  7. Egbert Bakker (2009). Speech in Homer. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):12-.
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  8. Jeffrey Andrew Barash (2010). The Place of Remembrance: Reflections on Paul Ricoeur's Theory of Collective Memory. In Brian Treanor & Henry Isaac Venema (eds.), A Passion for the Possible: Thinking with Paul Ricoeur. Fordham University Press.
  9. Amanda Barnier, John Sutton, Celia Harris & Robert A. Wilson (2008). A Conceptual and Empirical Framework for the Social Distribution of Cognition: The Case of Memory. Cognitive Systems Research 9 (1):33-51.
  10. Kathy Behrendt (2013). Hirsch, Sebald, and the Uses and Limits of Postmemory. In Russell J. A. Kilbourn & Eleanor Ty (eds.), The Memory Effect: The Remediation of Memory in Literature and Film. Wilfrid Laurier University Press. 51-67.
    Marianne Hirsch’s influential concept of postmemory articulates the ethical significance of representing trauma in art and literature. Postmemory, for Hirsch, “describes the relationship of children of survivors of cultural or collective trauma to the experiences of their parents, experiences that they ‘remember’ only as the narratives and images with which they grew up, but that are so powerful, so monumental, as to constitute memories in their own right”. Through appeal to recent philosophical work on memory, the ethics of remembering, and (...)
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  11. Kathy Behrendt (2010). Scraping Down the Past: Memory and Amnesia in W. G. Sebald's Anti-Narrative. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):394-408.
    Vanguard anti-narrativist Galen Strawson declares personal memory unimportant for self-constitution. But what if lapses of personal memory are sustained by a morally reprehensible amnesia about historical events, as happens in the work of W.G. Sebald? The importance of memory cannot be downplayed in such cases. Nevertheless, contrary to expectations, a concern for memory needn’t ally one with the narrativist position. Recovery of historical and personal memory results in self-dissolution and not self-unity or understanding in Sebald’s characters. In the end, Sebald (...)
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  12. Duncan Bell (2008). Agonistic Democracy and the Politics of Memory. Constellations 15 (1):148-166.
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  13. Silvia Benso (2003). A Politics of Witnessing: History, Memory, and the Third—Beyond Levinas. Studies in Practical Philosophy 3 (2):4-18.
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  14. Carole Blair, Greg Dickinson & Brian L. Ott (2010). Introduction : Rhetoric/Memory/Place. In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.
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  15. Jeffrey Blustein (2010). Forgiveness, Commemoration, and Restorative Justice: The Role of Moral Emotions. Metaphilosophy 41 (4):582-617.
    Abstract: Forgiveness of wrongdoing in response to public apology and amends making seems, on the face of it, to leave little room for the continued commemoration of wrongdoing. This rests on a misunderstanding of forgiveness, however, and we can explain why there need be no incompatibility between them. To do this, I emphasize the role of what I call nonangry negative moral emotions in constituting memories of wrongdoing. Memories so constituted can persist after forgiveness and have important moral functions, and (...)
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  16. Jeffrey Blustein (2008). The Moral Demands of Memory. Cambridge University Press.
    There is considerable contemporary interest in memory, both within the academy and in the public sphere. Little has been written by moral philosophers on the subject, however. In this timely book, Jeffrey Blustein explores the moral aspects and implications of memory, both personal and collective. He provides a systematic and philosophically rigorous account of a morality of memory, focusing on the value of memory, its relationship to identity, and the responsibilities associated with memory.
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  17. R. Bodei (1992). Farewell to the Past: Historical Memory, Oblivion and Collective Identity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 18 (3-4):251-265.
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  18. John Bodnar (2010). Memory. Bad Dreams About the Good War : Bataan. In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.
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  19. Bob Brecher (2006). Reparation, Responsibility and the Memory Game. Res Publica 12 (2):213-221.
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  20. David Bromwich (1990). Whitman and Memory: A Response to Kateb. Political Theory 18 (4):572-576.
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  21. Jeffrey Cain (2009). After Utopia: Three Post-Personal Subjects Consider the Possibilities William E. Connolly (2008) Capitalism and Christianity, American Style, Durham and London: Duke University Press.Alexander García Düttmann (2007) Philosophy of Exaggeration, Trans. James Phillips, London: Continuum.Adrian Parr (2008) Deleuze and Memorial Culture: Desire, Singular Memory, and the Politics of Trauma, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. [REVIEW] Deleuze Studies 3 (2):138-143.
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  22. Sue Campbell (2009). Inside the Frame of the Past : Memory, Diversity, and Solidarity. In Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press. 211--33.
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  23. Sue Campbell (1997). Women, "False" Memory, and Personal Identity. Hypatia 12 (2):51 - 82.
    We contest each other's memory claims all the time. I am concerned with how the contesting of memory claims and narratives may be an integral part of many abusive situations. I use the writings of Otto Weininger and the False Memory Syndrome Foundation to explore a particular strategy of discrediting women as rememberers, making them more vulnerable to sexual harm. This strategy relies on the presentation of women as unable to maintain a stable enough sense of self or identity to (...)
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  24. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2009). Cultural Memory, Empathy, and Rape. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (1):25-42.
    Assuming a relational understanding of the self, I argue that empathy is necessary for individual and cultural recovery from rape. However, gender affects our ability to listen with empathy to rape survivors. For women, the existence of cultural memories discourages empathy either by engendering fear of their own future rape or by provoking sympathy rather than empathy. For men, the lack of cultural memories makes rape what Arendt calls an "unreality," thus diminishing the possibility for empathy. Although empathetic listeningpresents gender (...)
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  25. David Carrier (2003). Remembering the Past: Art Museums as Memory Theatres. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (1):61–65.
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  26. Edward S. Casey (1987). Remembering: A Phenomenological Study. Indiana University Press.
    Edward S. Casey provides a thorough description of the varieties of human memory, including recognizing and reminding, reminiscing and commemorating, body memory and place memory. The preface to the new edition extends the scope of the original text to include issues of collective memory, forgetting, and traumatic memory, and aligns this book with Casey's newest work on place and space. This ambitious study demonstrates that nothing in our lives is unaffected by remembering.
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  27. Paolo Cherchi Usai (2001). The Death of Cinema: History, Cultural Memory, and the Digital Dark Age. Bfi Pub..
    It is estimated that about one and a half billion hours of moving images were produced in 1999, twice as many as a decade before. If that rate of growth continues, one hundred billion hours of moving images will be made in the year 2025. In 1895 there were just above forty minutes of moving images to be seen, and most of them are now preserved. Today, for every film made, thousands of them disappear forever without leaving a trace. Meanwhile, (...)
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  28. Patricia Cook (ed.) (1993). Philosophical Imagination and Cultural Memory: Appropriating Historical Traditions. Duke University Press.
    In this volume some of today's most influential thinkers face the question of philosophy's future and find an answer in its past.
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  29. Susan A. Crane (1997). Memory, Distortion, and History in the Museum. History and Theory 36 (4):44–63.
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  30. Sharon Crowley (2000). Memory, Identity, Community: The Idea of Narrative in the Human Sciences (Review). [REVIEW] Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (2):187-191.
  31. Fred Dallmayr (2001). Memory and Social Imagination: Latin American Reflections. Critical Horizons 2 (2):153-171.
    The imagination opens onto a reconciliation of the past with the future, especially when it is activated as a retrieval of the memories of collective suffering. This is especially the case with the Latin American experience, with its history of military governments and their 'dirty wars' against their civilians. Using Ricoeur's notion of the metaphorical imagination, and drawing on Dussel's work on ethical hermeneutics, this paper argues that, in the act of remembering, other social imaginaries can be created as possibilities (...)
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  32. Francisco Delich (2004). The Social Construction of Memory and Forgetting. Diogenes 51 (1):65-75.
    Half a century after Halbwachs laid the foundations of a sociology of memory, a new edition of his work Les cadres sociaux de la mémoire has allowed scholars both to understand it more fully and to appreciate its limitations. This article attempts to elucidate the problem of collective memory, distinguishing different forms of memory in the state and civil society. In this dialectic between state and society, collective memory is constructed. This is the main hypothesis of the article. The author (...)
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  33. Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.) (2010). Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.
    introduction Rhetoric/Memory/Place Carole Blair, Greg Dickinson, and Brian L. Ott The story is told of the poet Simonides of Ceos who, after chanting a poem ...
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  34. D. Dryden (2004). Memory, Imagination, and the Cognitive Value of the Arts. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):254-267.
  35. Pieter Duvenage (1999). The Politics of Memory and Forgetting After Auschwitz and Apartheid. Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (3):1-28.
    This article focuses on the politics of memory and forgetting after Auschwitz and apartheid. In the first two sections Habermas' critical contribution to the German Historikerstreit is discussed. Important in this regard is the moral dimension of our relation to the past. In the next two sections the emphasis shifts to South Africa and more specifically the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC). The article ends with a general discussion of the dilemma of historical 'truth' and representation in (...)
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  36. Richard J. Evans (2002). History, Memory, and the Law: The Historian as Expert Witness. History and Theory 41 (3):326–345.
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  37. Johannes Fabian (2007). Memory Against Culture: Arguments and Reminders. Duke University Press.
    Together the essays illuminate Fabianrs"s pluralist vision of an anthropology that always makes the other present by opening itself to conversational and ...
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  38. Marco Fantuzzi (2002). Homer and Memory. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (02):233-.
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  39. Steven P. Feldman (2007). Moral Memory: Why and How Moral Companies Manage Tradition. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (4):395 - 409.
    Recent research on the role of ethics in the organizational culture literature found practically the whole literature reduced to a debate between ethical rationalism and ethical relativism. The role of the past in the form of tradition to maintain and improve moral reflection is completely missing. To address this gap in the literature on the level of practice, the concepts of moral memory and moral tradition are applied to data on 22 companies that have long-standing moral practices. In this way, (...)
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  40. Laura Feldt (2010). Fantastic Re-Collection : Cultural Vs. Autobiographical Memory in the Exodus Narrative. In Armin W. Geertz & Jeppe Sinding Jensen (eds.), Religious Narrative, Cognition, and Culture: Image and Word in the Mind of Narrative. Equinox Pub. Ltd..
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  41. James Field (2010). The Changing Vessel of Memory -Identity and Text in Religion and Cultural Memory by Jan Assmann. Critical Horizons 11 (1):133-147.
    J. Assmann, Religion and Cultural Memory: Ten Studies (R. Livingstone trans; Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2006), ISBN 0804745226, 222 pp.
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  42. G. A. Fine (2007). Rumor, Trust and Civil Society: Collective Memory and Cultures of Judgment. Diogenes 54 (1):5-18.
    Contemporary societies are awash in rumor. Truth claims may have an uncertain provenance, but we tend to incorporate them into our belief system, act upon them, and recall them through collective memory. The question becomes who, what, where and when do we trust. The analysis of rumor belongs to the sociology of action. This paper sketches a brief analysis of the intersection of trust and rumors through the concepts of plausibility, credibility, frequency, diffusion, boundaries, divisiveness and stability or rumor. The (...)
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  43. Marilyn Fischer (2004). Democracy and Social Ethics, And: The Long Road of Woman's Memory (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (1):85-88.
  44. Bridget Fowler (2007). The Obituary as Collective Memory. Routledge Advances in Sociology.
    The first serious academic study of obituaries, this book focuses on how societies remember.
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  45. Dov Fox (2008). Brain Imaging and the Bill of Rights: Memory Detection Technologies and American Criminal Justice. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):34 – 36.
  46. Bruno S. Frey (2005). ''Just Forget It.'' Memory Distortions as Bounded Rationality. Mind and Society 4 (1):13-25.
    Distortions in memory impose important bounds on rationality but have been largely disregarded in economics. While it is possible to learn, it is more difficult, and sometimes impossible, to unlearn. This retention effect lowers individual utility directly or via reduced productivity, and adds costs to principal-agent relationships. The engraving effect states that the more one tries to forget a piece of information the more vivid it stays in memory, leading to a paradoxical outcome. The effects are based on, and are (...)
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  47. Victoria J. Gallagher & Margaret R. LaWare (2010). Sparring with Public Memory : The Rhetorical Embodiment of Race, Power, and Conflict in the Monument to Joe Louis. In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.
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  48. Grant Gillett (2009). The Moral Demands of Memory & Talking Cures and Placebo Effects. [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):420-422.
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  49. Carlo Ginzburg (2004). Memory and Distance: Learning From a Gilded Silver Vase (Antwerp, C. 1530). Diogenes 51 (1):99-112.
    This article concerns a silver beaker (now at the Residenzmuseum, Munich) decorated with scenes which seem to be related to the Spanish conquest of Mexico. On the basis of stylistic, iconographic and archival evidence the silversmith is here tentatively identified with an Italian-born artist, Stefano Capello, who is thought to have added a decoration to a pre-existing beaker on the eve of the treaty of Cambrai (3 August 1529). Margaret of Austria, aunt of the emperor Charles V, might have given (...)
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  50. Ilan Gur-Ze'ev (2001). The Production of Self and the Destruction of the Other's Memory and Identity in Israeli/Palestinian Education on the Holocaust/Nakbah. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):255-266.
    This paper characterizes a present institutionalizedunwillingness of both the Israeli and Palestinian educationalsystems to acknowledge each other's suffering because of the presenceof what the author terms `the otherness of the other.' This isdone largely through hegemonic control of memory of genocidesendured by both and through limiting constructions of the self.Coming to terms with `each other' paves the way for ahumanistic-oriented counter-education, one based in mutualacknowledgment and open dialogue.
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