This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Most recently added entries found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 934
  1. added 2016-07-25
    R. J. Leland & Han van Wietmarschen (forthcoming). Political Liberalism and Political Community. New Content is Available for Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    _ Source: _Page Count 26 We provide a justification for political liberalism’s Reciprocity Principle, which states that political decisions must be justified exclusively on the basis of considerations that all reasonable citizens can reasonably be expected to accept. The standard argument for the Reciprocity Principle grounds it in a requirement of respect for persons. We argue for a different, but compatible, justification: the Reciprocity Principle is justified because it makes possible a desirable kind of political community. The general endorsement of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. added 2016-07-25
    Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.) (2015). Global Food, Global Justice: Essays on Eating Under Globalization. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    As Brillant-Savarin remarked in 1825 in his classic text Physiologie du Goût, “Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are.” Philosophers and political theorists have only recently begun to pay attention to food as a critical domain of human activity and social justice. Too often these discussions treat food as a commodity and eating as a matter of individual choice. Policies that address the global obesity crisis by focusing on individual responsibility and medical interventions ignore (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. added 2016-07-24
    J. S. Dryzek (forthcoming). The Forum, the System, and the Polity: Three Varieties of Democratic Theory. Political Theory.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. added 2016-07-24
    E. A. Parker (forthcoming). Precarity and Elemental Difference: On Butlers Re-Writing of Irigarayan Difference. Political Theory.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. added 2016-07-23
    A. Norris (forthcoming). Michael Oakeshott and the Postulates of Individuality. Political Theory.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. added 2016-07-22
    Joseph Fishkin (forthcoming). Bottlenecks, Disability, and Preference-Formation in Advance. Social Philosophy Today.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. added 2016-07-18
    Constantin Stoenescu (ed.) (2014). Etica cercetării şi proprietatea intelectuală. Editura Universitatii Din Bucuresti.
    Volumul îşi propune să aducă în discuţie un domeniu de probleme de actualitate aflat în discuţie publică. Studiile abordează aspecte cu încărcătură teoretică diferită, dar toate converg tematic spre aceeaşi problemă generală a relaţiei dintre etica cercetării şi competiţia pentru recunoaşterea meritelor prin asigurarea şi reglementarea dreptului la proprietate intelectuală.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. added 2016-07-17
    Hannah Richter (forthcoming). Beyond the ‘Other’ as Constitutive Outside: The Politics of Immunity in Roberto Esposito and Niklas Luhmann. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885116658391.
    This article re-conceptualises the ‘constitutive outside’ through Roberto Esposito’s theory of immunity to detach it from Laclau and Mouffe’s political antagonism. It identifies Esposito’s thought as an innovative epistemological perspective to dissolve post-ontological political theories of community from the intertwinement with a foundational self/other dialectic. Esposito shows how a community can sustain its relations through introversive immunisation against a primarily undefined outside. But it is argued that his theory of immunity slips back to a vitalist depth ontology which ultimately de-politicises (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. added 2016-07-17
    Juliana Bidadanure (2016). Making Sense of Age-Group Justice: A Time for Relational Equality? Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (3):234-260.
    This article brings together two debates in contemporary political philosophy: on the one hand, the dispute between the distributive and relational approaches to equality and, on the other hand, the field of intergenerational equality. I offer an original contribution to the second domain and by doing so, I inform the first. The aim of this article is thus twofold: shedding some light on an under-researched and yet crucial question – ‘which inequalities between generations matter?’ and contributing to a far-reaching debate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. added 2016-07-17
    Rob Lawlor & Gerald Lang (2016). Numbers Scepticism, Equal Chances and Pluralism: Taurek Revisited. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (3):298-315.
    The ‘standard interpretation’ of John Taurek’s argument in ‘Should the Numbers Count?’ imputes two theses to him: first, ‘numbers scepticism’, or scepticism about the moral force of an appeal to the mere number of individuals saved in conflict cases; and second, the ‘equal greatest chances’ principle of rescue, which requires that every individual has an equal chance of being rescued. The standard interpretation is criticized here on a number of grounds. First, whilst Taurek clearly believes that equal chances are all-important, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. added 2016-07-17
    Alice Baderin (2016). Political Theory and Public Opinion: Against Democratic Restraint. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (3):209-233.
    How should political theorists go about their work if they are democrats? Given their democratic commitments, should they develop theories that are responsive to the views and concerns of their fellow citizens at large? Is there a balance to be struck, within political theory, between truth seeking and democratic responsiveness? The article addresses this question about the relationship between political theory, public opinion and democracy. I criticize the way in which some political theorists have appealed to the value of democratic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. added 2016-07-16
    Antonis Balasopoulos & Vasso Yannakopoulou (2016). "Suspicor Enim Eam Gentem a Graecis Originem Duxisse": Translating Utopia in Greek. Utopian Studies 27 (2):308-322.
    Hythlodaeus’s suspicion that the Utopians were originally Greeks reflects,1 as is well known, Thomas More’s own abiding love of the language2—to which, as Erasmus would inform Ulrich van Hutten, he had devoted his young years3—and the plethora of Greek puns with which he embellished his imaginary island, its administrative apparatus, and the peoples his narrator describes besides the Utopians. Hythlodaeus himself is instrumental in inspiring the Utopians with admiration for “the literature and learning of the Greeks.” Thanks to him, the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. added 2016-07-16
    Jill Buttery (2016). The Renaissance Utopia: Dialogue, Travel and the Ideal Society by Chloë Houston. Utopian Studies 27 (2):370-373.
    Chloë Houston’s The Renaissance Utopia: Dialogue, Travel and the Ideal Society traces two main developments in utopian literature from 1516 until its proliferation in the middle years of the seventeenth century. The first is the transition from utopia as philosophical satire to utopia as an imaginative means to achieve social reform. Second is the movement from utopias primarily being written as dialogues to utopias being written as narratives. Houston argues that as writers sought to reach a wider readership they rejected (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. added 2016-07-16
    Gerald Lang & Rob Lawlor (2016). Numbers Scepticism, Equal Chances and Pluralism Taurek Revisited. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (3):298-315.
    The ‘standard interpretation’ of John Taurek’s argument in ‘Should the Numbers Count?’ imputes two theses to him: first, ‘numbers scepticism’, or scepticism about the moral force of an appeal to the mere number of individuals saved in conflict cases; and second, the ‘equal greatest chances’ principle of rescue, which requires that every individual has an equal chance of being rescued. The standard interpretation is criticized here on a number of grounds. First, whilst Taurek clearly believes that equal chances are all-important, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. added 2016-07-16
    Yi-Chun Liu (2016). Translating and Transforming Utopia Into the Mandarin Context: Case Studies From China and Taiwan. Utopian Studies 27 (2):333-345.
    While the English translation of Thomas More’s Utopia first appeared in 1551, and enjoyed periodic cycles of reincarnation through several retranslations in the centuries to come, a Mandarin edition was not attempted until the mid-1930s. As of 2016—five hundred years after Utopia was first published—ten editions and nine translators have been involved in various efforts to transfer More’s canonical work into the Mandarin linguistic and cultural context. The very first Mandarin Chinese edition was translated by Liú Línshēng, published in 1935 (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. added 2016-07-16
    Ana Cláudia Romano Ribeiro & Christian Greis (2016). Utopia : Brazilian Translations in Context. Utopian Studies 27 (2):270-299.
    The theme of utopia has gained increasing attention from several sectors of Brazilian society. In the context of academic research, in the area of language studies, there are mainly two groups working in the field. The older one, “Literatura e Utopia,” was registered by the research group directory of the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development in 2000 and is headed by Ildney Cavalcanti and Alfredo Cordiviola, professors at the Federal University of Alagoas and the Federal University of Pernambuco, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. added 2016-07-16
    Lyman Tower Sargent (2016). The Gardens of the British Working Class by Margaret Willes. Utopian Studies 27 (2):390-392.
    While, as the author notes, working class was not used until 1790, the book begins in the sixteenth century. And while there are no direct references to utopias or utopianism, there are a number of themes and topics discussed in the book that are related to utopianism and the way gardens and gardening have appeared in utopias. And gardens and gardening have been important in utopias from the very beginning.1 Gardens, for example, are central to life in More’s Utopia and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. added 2016-07-16
    Artur Blaim (2016). Utopian Studies in Poland: A Preliminary Survey. Utopian Studies 27 (2):230-249.
    The earliest utopian studies in Poland coincided with the rise of the socialist movement in the latter half of the nineteenth century. The first such work, entitled Dwaj znakomici komuniści, Tomasz Morus i Tomasz Campanella, i ich systematy, Utopija i Państwo Słoneczne, was written by Bolesław Limanowski, a historian and socialist activist, who stressed the similarities between utopian institutions and those of socialist and communist projects. Foregrounding the question of property, he argued that socialists only wanted to implement the collectivization (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. added 2016-07-16
    Cameron Ellis (2016). Barack Obama and the Rhetoric of Hope by Mark S. Ferrara. Utopian Studies 27 (2):382-386.
    Mark S. Ferrara’s principle scholarly interests lie within the fields of religious studies and Asian philosophy, as indicated on his State University of New York–Oneonta English faculty page and demonstrated in his other books Between Noble and Humble: Cao Xueqin and the Dream of the Red Chamber and Palace of Ashes: China and the Decline of American Higher Education. However, it is his interests in rhetoric and political discourse, cultural studies, and world literature that make Barack Obama and the Rhetoric (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. added 2016-07-16
    Marie–Claire Phélippeau (2016). The French Translations of Thomas More's Utopia. Utopian Studies 27 (2):300-307.
    Thomas More’s Utopia must have exercised a special hold on imaginations in France, as we count as many as four complete French translations in the two centuries following the first publication of the work in 1516. They are all translations of the original Latin text and most often that of 1518 rather than the first 1516 Louvain version. The first French translation, by Jean Le Blond in 1550, was published even earlier than the first English version, by Ralph Robinson, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. added 2016-07-16
    Lyman Tower Sargent (2016). Edward Bellamy's Boston in 2000 From 1888 to 1897: The Evolution of Bellamy's Future Boston From Looking Backward Through Equality. [REVIEW] Utopian Studies 27 (2):152-181.
    In 1888 Edward Bellamy, a moderately successful journalist and novelist, produced Looking Backward, a eutopian novel that not only transformed his life but directly or indirectly affected the lives of many millions of people in all parts of the world and inspired hundreds of imitators, commentators, and critics to respond to Looking Backward or to write utopian novels in many languages.1 In addition, movements were started to attempt to put Bellamy’s ideas into practice,2 and at least one intentional community was (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. added 2016-07-16
    Fátima Vieira (2016). Translations: Utopia's Afterlives. Utopian Studies 27 (2):268-269.
    Did you know that More’s Utopia was first translated into French in 1550, into Hungarian in 1910, into Mandarin in 1935, into Brazilian Portuguese in 1937, into Polish in 1947, and into Greek as late as 1970? Did you know that there were more translations of Utopia into French at the time of the Enlightenment and the French Revolution than at any other point in French history? That the readers of the second translation into Hungarian never got to know that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. added 2016-07-16
    David M. Bell (2016). Paying "Utopia" a Subversive Fidelity; or, An Affective Trip to Anarres. Utopian Studies 27 (2):129-151.
    It has been five hundred years since the term utopia was coined; and in that time it has been widely read, used, and distorted. This is no bad thing in and of itself, for meanings change over time; and as Ernst Bloch notes, “To limit the utopian to the Thomas More variety, or simply to try to orientate it in that direction, would be like trying to reduce electricity to the amber from which it gets its Greek name and in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. added 2016-07-16
    Ildney Cavalcanti (2016). Utopian Studies in Brazil: Roots and Routes. Utopian Studies 27 (2):210-229.
    This article aims to highlight some of the roots and routes, the beginnings and the potential futures, of a body of scholarly research actions that may be grouped under the umbrella expression “utopian studies in Brazil,” a promising field whose initial trends in our country can be traced—not by chance if one considers the prominence of the Anglo-American tradition in literary utopianism—in the departments of English studies of Brazilian university faculties. This does not mean, however, that there have been no (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. added 2016-07-16
    Maria P. Ferretti (2016). Risk Imposition and Freedom. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (3):261-279.
    Various authors hold that what is wrong with risk imposition is that being at risk diminishes the opportunities available to an agent. Arguably, even when risk does not result in material or psychological damages, it still represents a setback in terms of some legitimate interests. However, it remains to be specified what those interests are. This article argues that risk imposition represents a diminishment of overall freedom. Freedom will be characterized in empirical terms, as the range of unimpeded actions available (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. added 2016-07-16
    Krzysztof M. Maj (2016). Gazing in Useless Wonder. English Utopian Fiction 1516–1800 by Artur Blaim. Utopian Studies 27 (2):376-381.
    Artur Blaim’s Gazing in Useless Wonder. English Utopian Fictions 1516–1800, the thirteenth volume of the esteemed Ralahine Utopian Studies series, has already received praises as a must-read monograph from such renowned utopian scholars as Lyman Tower Sargent and Gregory Claeys—and indeed it challenges anyone who would dare state otherwise. And even though such flawless pieces of research are not that common, Blaim’s book definitely has the potential to set a precedent in that regard, being a thorough and cohesive analysis of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. added 2016-07-16
    Lyman Tower Sargent (2016). Chinchilla's Communal Settlers by Veronica Dawson. Utopian Studies 27 (2):387-389.
    This book is a study of three intentional communities established with government support in the 1890s in Queensland, Australia. All three were short-lived, and as the title suggests, although there is considerable information on the communities, the focus of the book is on the settlers rather than on the communities. In fact, and extremely unusual in studies of intentional communities, there are extensive biographical dictionaries on the members of all three communities. And these dictionaries include information on the men involved (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. added 2016-07-16
    Fátima Vieira (2016). Introduction to the Special Issue. Utopian Studies 27 (2):193-196.
    In a paper entitled “Contemporary Scholarship on Utopianism” presented in 1999 at a Comparative Thematic Network Project meeting in Italy, Lyman Sargent explained that when, two decades earlier, he had begun his research on the concept of utopia and started his bibliography of literary works and his list of utopian communities, none of the academics who were working in the field of utopian studies knew what the others were doing. And this happened, he clarified, because “there were no professional associations (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. added 2016-07-16
    Sofia de Melo Araújo (2016). Os Retornos da Utopia: Histórias, Imagens, Experiências Ed. By Alfredo Cordiviola and Ildney Cavalcanti. Utopian Studies 27 (2):364-370.
    In 2000 “Literatura e Utopia”, a research group led by Ildney Cavalcanti, started working at the Federal University of Alagoas, including members from three other institutions. Despite its namesake, the group focuses extensively on cultural as well as literary aspects of utopian thinking, with special regard for the colonial and postcolonial viewpoints of Latin America. The group has been responsible for two issues of the university’s language and literature journal Leitura. They also penned the 2006 volume Fábulas da Iminência. Ensaios (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. added 2016-07-16
    Jill Buttery (2016). Forms in Early Modern Utopia: The Ethnography of Perfection by Nina Chordas. Utopian Studies 27 (2):373-376.
    In her book Forms in Early Modern Utopia: The Ethnography of Perfection, Nina Chordas challenges the idea that early modern utopia literature is a fictional literary genre. She argues that utopia literature should be considered a conglomeration of genres with a hybrid life, that is, as both fiction and real-life phenomenon in the early modern period. Her aim is to show that the development of utopia as a genre in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries was a response to the convergence (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. added 2016-07-16
    Katarzyna Pisarska (2016). More's Utopia in Poland: Translations and Impact—An Overview. Utopian Studies 27 (2):346-362.
    For more than four hundred years following its publication, Utopia remained untranslated into Polish. The book instead functioned in its Latin version, the main edition in use being the 1516 text published in Louvain by Peter Giles. In the sixteenth century, translations of Utopia into several modern languages became available in Poland, which, however, had little effect on the readership and appreciation of More’s utopian ideas. Although sixteenth- and seventeenth-century writers, statesmen, and even common readers were familiar with More’s Utopia, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. added 2016-07-16
    Lyman Tower Sargent (2016). Five Hundred Years of Thomas More's Utopia and Utopianism. Utopian Studies 27 (2):184-192.
    Five hundred years after it was published, there is still no agreement on how to interpret Thomas More’s Utopia, and there are also fundamental disagreements about the way we think about the entire utopian genre. Therefore, some reflections on both Utopia and the genre seem appropriate. Utopia is a complex book that was initially published in Latin, with editions in German in 1524, Italian in 1548, English in 1551, Dutch in 1553, and French in 1559. Utopia has been read, interpreted, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. added 2016-07-16
    Fátima Vieira (2016). Utopian Studies in Portugal. Utopian Studies 27 (2):250-267.
    Portugal is the home country of Raphael Hythloday. There are many reasons why Thomas More chose for the protagonist of his masterpiece to be Portuguese. The most obvious certainly is the fact that the Portuguese had been crossing the oceans for a hundred years when More started writing Utopia. Other reasons are less prestigious for my country, such as the fact that my countrymen were then famous for exaggerating their travel accounts, thus offering a good model for the unreliable nature (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. added 2016-07-16
    Zsolt Czigányik (2016). The Hungarian Translations of Thomas More's Utopia. Utopian Studies 27 (2):323-332.
    Utopianism does not play a central role in Hungarian culture, yet the oeuvres of major writers include significant utopian or dystopian works. The first Hungarian translation of Utopia, by Ferenc Kelen, was published rather belatedly in 1910. This precise but cumbersome translation was followed by a most enjoyable text in 1941, translated by László Geréb. This latter edition is, however, an abridged one, leaving out important sections of the original; it is thus not surprising that only two years later a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. added 2016-07-16
    Andrew Milner & Verity Burgmann (2016). Utopia and Utopian Studies in Australia. Utopian Studies 27 (2):200-209.
    There are no independently Australian translations of Thomas More’s Utopia: Australian publishing has been, for most of its history, essentially an adjunct to British publishing and has typically exercised autonomy only in specifically Australian fields such as Australian literature, Australian history, and Australian politics. Nonetheless, Australian institutions and individuals have acquired copies of English or British editions. The oldest version of the original Latin text held in the Australian National Library in Canberra is Hall’s published in Oxford in 1663; the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. added 2016-07-16
    Lyman Tower Sargent (2016). Dreamstreets: A Journey Through Britain's Village Utopias by Jacqueline Yallop. Utopian Studies 27 (2):393-394.
    Although the title Dreamstreets and the use of the word utopias in the subtitle strongly suggest a focus on the utopian, there are only a few references to utopia in the book, which is about the author’s responses to some of the model villages established in Britain in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The author says that there were about four hundred such villages, and she has visited many I have not visited and know little about; she is particularly (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. added 2016-07-16
    Fátima Vieira (2016). Mapping Research in Utopian Studies. Utopian Studies 27 (2):197-199.
    What is interesting in the descriptions of research being carried out in Australia, Brazil, Poland, and Portugal hereby published is the divergent traditions of research organization. These have been shaped not only by disparate understandings of how research should be conducted but also by national funding policies; additional factors are the geographic dimension of each country and the relevance of the concept of utopia to national history.The article by Andrew Milner and Verity Burgmann reveals that although Australia depends for the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. added 2016-07-16
    Paul Gowder (2015). What the Laws Demand of Socrates—and of Us. The Monist 4 (1):260-374.
    In historical and strategic context, the argument of the Laws in Plato’s Crito should be understood not as an argument for legal obedience in general, but as an argument against the public display of legal impunity (i.e., procured by bribery). Stable democratic authority requires the threat of mass collective action in support of the rule of law. But that threat is not credible without widespread trust by citizens in their fellows’ commitment to the law. Socrates’s impunity would have undermined that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. added 2016-07-16
    Joseph Fishkin (2014). Bottlenecks: A New Theory of Equal Opportunity. Oxford University Press.
    Equal opportunity is a powerful idea, and one with extremely broad appeal in contemporary politics, political theory, and law. But what does it mean? On close examination, the most attractive existing conceptions of equal opportunity turn out to be impossible to achieve in practice, or even in theory. As long as families are free to raise their children differently, no two people's opportunities will be equal; nor is it possible to disentangle someone's abilities or talents from her background advantages and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. added 2016-07-15
    Miriam Ronzoni (forthcoming). The European Union as a Demoicracy: Really a Third Way? European Journal of Political Theory:1474885116656573.
    Should the EU be a federal union or an intergovernmental forum? Recently, demoicrats have been arguing that there exists a third alternative. The EU should be conceived as a demoicracy, namely a ‘Union of peoples who govern together, but not as one’. The demoi of Europe recognise that they affect one another’s democratic health, and hence establish a union to guarantee their freedom qua demoi – which most demoicrats cash out as non-domination. This is more than intergovernmentalism, because the demoi (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. added 2016-07-14
    Michael C. Hawley (forthcoming). Individuality and Hierarchy in Cicero’s De Officiis. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885116657693.
    This essay explores a creative argument that Cicero offers to answer a fundamental question: how are we to judge among different ways of life? Is there a natural hierarchy of human types? In response to this problem, Cicero gives an account of a person’s possessing two natures. All of us participate in a general human nature, the characteristics of which provide us with certain universal duties and a natural moral hierarchy. But, we also each possess an individual nature, qualities that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. added 2016-07-14
    J. Havercroft & D. Owen (forthcoming). Soul-Blindness, Police Orders and Black Lives Matter: Wittgenstein, Cavell, and Ranciere. Political Theory.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. added 2016-07-14
    Matthew Lister (forthcoming). The Place of Persecution and Non-State Action in Refugee Protection. In Alex Sager (ed.), The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends. Rowman & Littlefield
    Crises of forced migration are, unfortunately, nothing new. At the time of the writing of this paper, at least two such crises were in full swing – mass movements from the Middle East and parts of Africa to the E.U., and major movements from Central America to the Southern U.S. border, including movements by large numbers of families and unaccompanied minors. These movements are complex, with multiple causes, and it is always risky to attempt to craft either general policy or (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. added 2016-07-14
    Mark Devenney, David Howarth, Aletta J. Norval, Yannis Stavrakakis, Oliver Marchart, Paula Biglieri & Gloria Perelló (2016). Ernesto Laclau. Contemporary Political Theory 15 (3):304-335.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. added 2016-07-14
    John Horton (2016). Book Review: Defending Associative Obligations, by Jonathan Seglow. [REVIEW] Political Theory 44 (4):597-600.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. added 2016-07-14
    Michael Freeden (2016). Book Review: The Making of Modern Liberalism, by Alan Ryan. [REVIEW] Political Theory 44 (4):586-589.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. added 2016-07-14
    Michael Elliott (2016). Book Review: Red Skin, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition, by Glen Sean Coulthard. [REVIEW] Political Theory 44 (4):593-597.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. added 2016-07-14
    Nick Bromell (2016). Where the Distinction Between Action and Knowledge Vanishes”: Pierre Rosanvallon’s “Philosophical History of the Political. [REVIEW] Political Theory 44 (4):578-585.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. added 2016-07-14
    Betsy Erkkila (2016). Whitman, Melville, and Political Theory. [REVIEW] Political Theory 44 (4):567-577.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. added 2016-07-13
    Merten Reglitz (forthcoming). A Kantian Argument Against World Poverty. European Journal of Political Theory.
    Immanuel Kant is recognized as one of the first philosophers who wrote systematically about global justice and world peace. In the current debate on global justice he is mostly appealed to by critics of extensive duties of global justice. However, I show in this paper that an analysis of Kant’s late work on rights and justice provides ample resources for disagreeing with those who take Kant to call for only modest changes in global politics. Kant’s comments in the Doctrine of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 934