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  1. M. Albert, D. Schmidtchen & S. Voigt (eds.) (forthcoming). Scientific Competition: Theory and Policy, Conferences on New Political Economy. Mohr Siebeck.
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  2. Keith Michael Baker (1975). Condorcet, From Natural Philosophy to Social Mathematics. University of Chicago Press.
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  3. Nicholas Bardsley (2007). Teamwork: Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives, Edited by Natalie Gold. Palgrave Macmillan, 2005, XXVI+253 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):237-240.
  4. Gennady S. Batygin (2004). Social Scientists in Times of Crisis: The Structural Transformations Within the Disciplinary Organization and Thematic Repertoire of the Social Sciences. Studies in East European Thought 56 (1):7-54.
    This is a contribution to thesociology and social epistemology of knowledgeproduction in Russian social sciences today. Inthe initial section, the epistemic status andsocial function of Soviet social scientificdiscourse are characterized in terms of textualforms and their modes of (re-)production. Theremaining sections detail the course of therestructuration of social scientific discoursesince the fall of the Soviet Union and draw onextant empirical sources, in particular studiesof bibliographical rubrics, thematicrepertoires, and current textual formsthroughout the public sphere and the academicestablishment in Russia. An underlying (...)
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  5. Aditi Bhattacharyya, Prasanta K. Pattanaik & Yongsheng Xu (2011). Choice, Internal Consistency and Rationality. Economics and Philosophy 27 (2):123-149.
  6. James Bohman (2012). Domination, Epistemic Injustice and Republican Epistemology. Social Epistemology 26 (2):175-187.
    With her conception of epistemic injustice, Miranda Fricker has opened up new normative dimensions for epistemology; that is, the injustice of denying one?s status as a knower. While her analysis of the remedies for such injustices focuses on the epistemic virtues of agents, I argue for the normative superiority of adapting a broadly republican conception of epistemic injustice. This argument for a republican epistemology has three steps. First, I focus on methodological and explanatory issues of identifying epistemic injustice and argue, (...)
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  7. James Bohman (2006). Deliberative Democracy and the Epistemic Benefits of Diversity. Episteme 3 (3):175-191.
    It is often assumed that democracies can make good use of the epistemic benefi ts of diversity among their citizenry, but difficult to show why this is the case. In a deliberative democracy, epistemically relevant diversity has three aspects: the diversity of opinions, values, and perspectives. Deliberative democrats generally argue for an epistemic form of Rawls' difference principle: that good deliberative practice ought to maximize deliberative inputs, whatever they are, so as to benefi t all deliberators, including the least eff (...)
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  8. Walter Bossert, Chloe X. Qi & John A. Weymark (2013). Measuring Group Fitness in a Biological Hierarchy: An Axiomatic Social Choice Approach. Economics and Philosophy 29 (3):301-323.
    This article illustrates how axiomatic social choice theory can be used in the evaluation of measures of group fitness for a biological hierarchy, thereby contributing to the dialogue between the philosophy of biology and social choice theory. It provides an axiomatic characterization of the ordering underlying the MichodSolariNedelcu index of group fitness for a multicellular organism. The MVSHN index has been used to analyse the germ-soma specialization and the fitness decoupling between the cell and organism levels that takes place during (...)
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  9. Harry Brighouse (1994). Choosing Justice: An Experimental Approach to Ethical Theory, Frohlich Norman and Joe A. Oppenheimer. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992, Xiv + 258 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 10 (01):127-.
  10. John Broome (1989). Should Social Preferences Be Consistent? Economics and Philosophy 5 (01):7-.
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  11. Mario Bunge (1996). The Seven Pillars of Popper's Social Philosophy. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 26 (4):528-556.
    The author submits that Popper's social philosophy rests on seven pillars: rationality (both conceptual and practical), individualism (ontological and methodological), libertarianism, the nonexistence of historical laws, negative utilitarianism ("Do no harm"), piecemeal social engineering, and a view on social order. The first six pillars are judged to be weak, and the seventh broken. In short, it is argued that Popper did not build a comprehensive, profound, or even consistent system of social philosophy on a par with his work in epistemology. (...)
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  12. Donald Thomas Campbell (1988). Methodology and Epistemology for Social Science: Selected Papers. University of Chicago Press.
    Since the 1950s, Donald T. Campbell has been one of the most influential contributors to the methodology of the social sciences. A distinguished psychologist, he has published scores of widely cited journal articles, and two awards, in social psychology and in public policy, have been named in his honor. This book is the first to collect his most significant papers, and it demonstrates the breadth and originality of his work.
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  13. Ian Carter & Matthew H. Kramer (2008). How Changes in One's Preferences Can Affect One's Freedom (and How They Cannot): A Reply to Dowding and Van Hees. Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):81-96.
  14. Thomas Christiano (2001). Democracy and Social Epistemology. Philosophical Topics 29 (1/2):67-90.
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  15. Jelle de Boer (2012). A Strawson–Lewis Defence of Social Preferences. Economics and Philosophy 28 (3):291-310.
    This paper examines a special kind of social preference, namely a preference to do one's part in a mixed-motive setting because the other party expects one to do so. I understand this expectation-based preference as a basic reactive attitude (Strawson 1974). Given this, and the fact that expectations in these circumstances are likely to be based on other people's preferences, I argue that in cooperation a special kind of equilibrium ensues, which I call a loop, with people's preferences and expectations (...)
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  16. Igor Douven & Jan-Willem Romeijn (2007). The Discursive Dilemma as a Lottery Paradox. Economics and Philosophy 23 (3):301-319.
    List and Pettit have stated an impossibility theorem about the aggregation of individual opinion states. Building on recent work on the lottery paradox, this paper offers a variation on that result. The present result places different constraints on the voting agenda and the domain of profiles, but it covers a larger class of voting rules, which need not satisfy the proposition-wise independence of votes.
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  17. Michael Dummett (1988). Foundations of Social Choice Theory, Jon Elster and Aanund Hylland, Editors. In Series Studies in Rationality and Social Change, Edited by Jon Elster and Gudmund Hernes. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1986, 250 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 4 (01):177-.
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  18. Lindy M. Edwards (2009). Ideational Social Capital and the Civic Culture: Extricating Putnam's Legacy From the Social Capital Debates. Social Epistemology 23 (2):125 – 144.
    Robert Putnam's work was a double-edged sword for social capital scholars. It brought unprecedented attention to the research agenda but also created conceptual confusion. Many scholars have tried to disentangle Coleman's concept of social capital from what some described as Putnam's “fuzzy psychological notion” of civic culture values. Despite the rigour of these efforts, Putnam's influence remains, because scholars and policy makers are drawn to the benefits his work promised. This article takes a different tack, and seeks to extricate Putnam's (...)
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  19. Marc Fleurbaey (2007). Social Choice and Just Institutions: New Perspectives. Economics and Philosophy 23 (1):15-43.
    It has become accepted that social choice is impossible in the absence of interpersonal comparisons of well-being. This view is challenged here. Arrow obtained an impossibility theorem only by making unreasonable demands on social choice functions. With reasonable requirements, one can get very attractive possibilities and derive social preferences on the basis of non-comparable individual preferences. This new approach makes it possible to design optimal second-best institutions inspired by principles of fairness, while traditionally the analysis of optimal second-best institutions was (...)
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  20. Michael Fuerstein (2008). Epistemic Democracy and the Social Character of Knowledge. Episteme 5 (1):pp. 74-93.
    How can democratic governments be relied upon to achieve adequate political knowledge when they turn over their authority to those of no epistemic distinction whatsoever? This deep and longstanding concern is one that any proponent of epistemic conceptions of democracy must take seriously. While Condorcetian responses have recently attracted substantial interest, they are largely undermined by a fundamental neglect of agenda-setting. I argue that the apparent intractability of the problem of epistemic adequacy in democracy stems in large part from a (...)
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  21. Peter Gärdenfors (2006). A Representation Theorem for Voting with Logical Consequences. Economics and Philosophy 22 (2):181-190.
    This paper concerns voting with logical consequences, which means that anybody voting for an alternative x should vote for the logical consequences of x as well. Similarly, the social choice set is also supposed to be closed under logical consequences. The central result of the paper is that, given a set of fairly natural conditions, the only social choice functions that satisfy social logical closure are oligarchic (where a subset of the voters are decisive for the social choice). The set (...)
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  22. Gerald F. Gaus (1996). Justificatory Liberalism: An Essay on Epistemology and Political Theory. Oxford University Press.
    This book advances a theory of personal, public and political justification. Drawing on current work in epistemology and cognitive psychology, the work develops a theory of personally justified belief. Building on this account, it advances an account of public justification that is more normative and less "populist" than that of "political liberals." Following the social contract theories of Hobbes, Locke and Kant, the work then argues that citizens have conclusive reason to appoint an umpire to resolve disputes arising from inconclusive (...)
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  23. Peter J. Hammond (1989). Book Review:Foundations of Social Choice Theory. Jon Elster, Aanund Hylland. [REVIEW] Ethics 100 (1):190-.
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  24. Milena Ivanova & Cedric Paternotte (2013). Theory Choice, Good Sense and Social Consensus. Erkenntnis 78 (5):1109-1132.
    There has been a significant interest in the recent literature in developing a solution to the problem of theory choice which is both normative and descriptive, but agent-based rather than rule-based, originating from Pierre Duhem’s notion of ‘good sense’. In this paper we present the properties Duhem attributes to good sense in different contexts, before examining its current reconstructions advanced in the literature and their limitations. We propose an alternative account of good sense, seen as promoting social consensus in science, (...)
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  25. Mortimer R. Kadish (1983). Practice and Paradox: A Comment on Social Choice Theory. Ethics 93 (4):680-694.
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  26. Gregory S. Kavka (1991). Is Individual Choice Less Problematic Than Collective Choice? Economics and Philosophy 7:143-165.
  27. Lewis A. Kornhauser & Lawrence G. Sager (2004). The Many as One: Integrity and Group Choice in Paradoxical Cases. Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (3):249–276.
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  28. Uskali Mäki (2004). Economic Epistemology: Hopes and Horrors. Episteme 1 (3):211-222.
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  29. Bill Martin (1993). Liberalism: Modern and Postmodern. Social Epistemology 7 (1):75 – 81.
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  30. Raymond G. McInnis (ed.) (2001). Discourse Synthesis: Studies in Historical and Contemporary Social Epistemology. Praeger.
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  31. Mike Michael & Nik Brown (2000). From the Representation of Publics to the Performance of 'Lay Political Science'. Social Epistemology 14 (1):3-19.
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  32. Juan D. Moreno-Ternero (2009). A Primer in Social Choice Theory , Wulf Gaertner, Oxford University Press, 2006, XIII + 200 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 25 (3):397-403.
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  33. William Nelson (2008). The Epistemic Value of the Democratic Process. Episteme 5 (1):pp. 19-32.
    An epistemic theory of democracy, I assume, is meant to provide on answer to the question of why democracy is desirable. It does so by trying to show how the democratic process can have epistemic value. I begin by describing a couple of examples of epistemic theories in the literature and bringing out what they presuppose. I then examine a particular type of theory, worked out most thoroughly by Joshua Cohen, which seems to imply that democracy has epistemic value. The (...)
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  34. Samir Okasha (2009). Individuals, Groups, Fitness and Utility: Multi-Level Selection Meets Social Choice Theory. Biology and Philosophy 24 (5):561-584.
    In models of multi-level selection, the property of Darwinian fitness is attributed to entities at more than one level of the biological hierarchy, e.g. individuals and groups. However, the relation between individual and group fitness is a controversial matter. Theorists disagree about whether group fitness should always, or ever, be defined as total (or average) individual fitness. This paper tries to shed light on the issue by drawing on work in social choice theory, and pursuing an analogy between fitness and (...)
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  35. Marc Pauly (2008). On the Role of Language in Social Choice Theory. Synthese 163 (2):227 - 243.
    Axiomatic characterization results in social choice theory are usually compared either regarding the normative plausibility or regarding the logical strength of the axioms involved. Here, instead, we propose to compare axiomatizations according to the language used for expressing the axioms. In order to carry out such a comparison, we suggest a formalist approach to axiomatization results which uses a restricted formal logical language to express axioms. Axiomatic characterization results in social choice theory then turn into definability results of formal logic. (...)
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  36. Fabienne Peter (2007). Democratic Legitimacy and Proceduralist Social Epistemology. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 6 (3):329-353.
    A conception of legitimacy is at the core of normative theories of democracy. Many different conceptions of legitimacy have been put forward, either explicitly or implicitly. In this article, I shall first provide a taxonomy of conceptions of legitimacy that can be identified in contemporary democratic theory. The taxonomy covers both aggregative and deliberative democracy. I then argue for a conception of democratic legitimacy that takes the epistemic dimension of public deliberation seriously. In contrast to standard interpretations of epistemic democracy, (...)
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  37. Anthony Piepe (1971). Knowledge and Social Order: The Relationship Between Human Knowledge and the Construction of Social Theory. London,Heinemann.
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  38. Ashley Piggins (2007). Population Issues in Social Choice Theory, Welfare Economics, and Ethics, by Charles Blackorby, Walter Bossert, and David Donaldson. Cambridge University Press, 2005, VIII+369 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 23 (2):256-260.
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  39. Mozaffar Qizilbash (2007). Social Choice and Individual Capabilities. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 6 (2):169-192.
    Amartya Sen has recently suggested that certain issues which arise in the application of the capability approach can be seen in terms of social choice. This article explores certain connections and tensions between Kenneth Arrow's celebrated discussion of social choice and the capability approach while focusing on one central link: pluralism. Given the variety of values people hold, substantive issues which arise in the application of the capability approach can be seen as social choice problems. Seeing them in this way (...)
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  40. Kevin Roberts (2009). Social Choice Theory and the Informational Basis Approach. In Christopher W. Morris (ed.), Amartya Sen. Cambridge University Press.
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  41. Kai A. Schafft & David L. Brown (2003). Social Capital, Social Networks, and Social Power. Social Epistemology 17 (4):329 – 342.
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  42. Paul Seabright (1989). Social Choice and Social Theories. Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (4):365-387.
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  43. Daniel Steel & S. Kedzie Hall (2010). Naturalism and the Enlightenment Ideal : Rethinking a Central Debate in the Philosophy of Social Science. In P. D. Magnus & Jacob Busch (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The naturalism versus interpretivism debate the in philosophy of social science is traditionally framed as the question of whether social science should attempt to emulate the methods of natural science. I show that this manner of formulating the issue is problematic insofar as it presupposes an implausibly strong unity of method among the natural sciences. I propose instead that what is at stake in this debate is the feasibility and desirability of what I call the Enlightenment ideal of social science. (...)
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  44. Nico Stehr (1994). Knowledge Societies. Sage.
    Knowledge Societies offers both a critical examination of existing social theory, and a new synthesis of social theory with the actual study of knowledge relations in advanced economies. Some of the elements explored are scientization: the penetration not only of production but of most social action by scientific knowledge; the transformation of access to knowledge through higher education; the growth of experts (managers, accountants, advisors, and counselors) and of corresponding institutions based on the deployment of specialized knowledge; and a shift (...)
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  45. David Stoesz (1990). Provocation on the Politics of Government-Funded Research. Part. Social Epistemology 4 (1):121 – 123.
  46. David Stoesz (1988). Packaging the Conservative Revolution. Social Epistemology 2 (2):145 – 153.
    ?Packaging the Conservative Revolution? assesses the role of conservative think?tanks, particularly the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) and the Heritage Foundation, in engineering conservative prominence in national affairs. While AEI and Heritage have been particularly effective in promoting conservatism to legislators and the public, serious problems emerge from their analyses. The anti?welfare state bias of AEI projects reflects the dominance of Fortune 500 executives on its Board of Directors. Theoretical manipulation by AEI project directors raises questions about the purpose of their (...)
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  47. Nicholas L. Sturgeon (1995). Critical Study. Allan Gibbard, Wise Choices, Apt Feelings. Noûs 29 (3):402-24.
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  48. Kotaro Suzumura, An Interview with Paul Samuelson: Welfare Economics, €Œold†and €Œnewâ€, and Social Choice Theory.
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  49. Albert Weale (1989). Liberal Utilitarianism. Social Choice Theory and J. S. Mill's Philosophy. Jonathan Riley, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1988, Pp. 398. [REVIEW] Utilitas 1 (02):306-.
Arrow's Theorem
  1. Franz Dietrich & Christian List, Probabilistic Opinion Pooling Generalized -- Part One: General Agendas.
    How can different individuals' probability assignments to some events be aggregated into a collective probability assignment? Classic results on this problem assume that the set of relevant events -- the agenda -- is a sigma-algebra and is thus closed under disjunction (union) and conjunction (intersection). We drop this demanding assumption and explore probabilistic opinion pooling on general agendas. One might be interested in the probability of rain and that of an interest-rate increase, but not in the probability of rain or (...)
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