Related categories
Subcategories:History/traditions: Social Contract
149 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 149
Material to categorize
  1. Gerald Gaus (2012). Justification, Choice and Promise: Three Devices of the Consent Tradition in a Diverse Society. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (2):109-127.
    The twin ideas at the heart of the social contract tradition are that persons are naturally free and equal, and that genuine political obligations must in some way be based on the consent of those obligated. The Lockean tradition has held that consent must be in the form of explicit choice; Kantian contractualism has insisted on consent as rational endorsement. In this paper I seek to bring the Kantian and Lockean contract traditions together. Kantian rational justification and actual choice are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jacek Hołówka (1979). Contractarian Justice. Dialectics and Humanism 6 (4):63-71.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Efraim Podoksik (2009). The Contract of Fallibility. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (4):394.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Contractarianism about Political Authority
  1. Marcus Arvan (forthcoming). Why Hobbes Cannot Limit the Leviathan: A Critical Commentary on Larry May's Limiting Leviathan. Hobbes Studies.
    This commentary contends that Larry May’s Hobbesian argument for limitations on sovereignty and lawmaking in Limiting Leviathan does not succeed. First, I show that Hobbes begins with a plausible instrumental theory of normativity. Second, I show that Hobbes then attempts, unsuccessfully—by his own lights—to defend a kind of non-instrumental, moral normativity. Thus, I contend, in order to successfully “limit the Leviathan” of the state, the Hobbesian must provide a sound instrumental argument in favor of the sovereign limiting their actions and (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Corey Brettschneider (2007). The Rights of the Guilty. Political Theory 35 (2):175-199.
    In this essay I develop and defend a theory of state punishment within a wider conception of political legitimacy. While many moral theories of punishment focus on what is deserved by criminals, I theorize punishment within the specific context of the state’s relationship to its citizens. Central to my account is Rawls’s “liberal principle of legitimacy,” which requires that all state coercion be justifiable to all citizens. I extend this idea to the justification of political coercion to criminals qua citizens. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. P. F. Brownsey (1978). Hume and the Social Contract. Philosophical Quarterly 28 (111):132-148.
    Doubts the adequacy of teh accounts of Humes' successful refutation of the theory of a social contract. Groups Humes' refutation into three arguments: 1) hardly any social contracts are idscernible in the hoistories of actual governments 2) contract theory must be wrong because it conflicts with ordinary people's views on the sunject 3) utilitarian Argues that it is doubtful whether any of these arguments or clusters of arguments really refutes contract theory; certainly, none achieves a refutation of the 'simple and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Eric M. Cave (1996). Would Pluralist Angels (Really) Need Government? Philosophical Studies 81 (2-3):227 - 246.
  5. Fred D'Agostino, John Thrasher & Gerald Gaus, Contemporary Approaches to the Social Contract. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  6. O. de Selincourt (1937). The Social Contract: A Critical Study of Its Development. By J. W. Gough. (Oxford: At the Clarendon Press, London: Humphrey Milford. 1936. Pp. Viii + 234. Price 12s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 12 (47):362-.
  7. Joseph P. DeMarco (1975). The Social Contract or Principles of Political Right. Teaching Philosophy 1 (2):212-213.
  8. Elisabeth Ellis (2010). The Received Hobbes. In Ian Shapiro (ed.), Leviathan. Yale University Press. 481-518.
  9. Daniel M. Farrell (1988). Taming Leviathan: Reflections on Some Recent Work on Hobbes:Hobbes and the Social Contract Tradition. Jean Hampton; Hobbesian Moral and Political Theory. Gregory S. Kavka. [REVIEW] Ethics 98 (4):793-.
  10. Daniel M. Farrell (1988). Symposium Papers, Comments and an Abstract: Comments on "Hobbes' Social Contract". Noûs 22 (1):83-84.
  11. James S. Fishkin (1990). Symposia Papers: Towards a New Social Contract. Noûs 24 (2):217-226.
  12. Danny Frederick (2013). Social Contract Theory Should Be Abandoned. Rationality, Markets and Morals 4:178-89.
    I argue that social-contract theory cannot succeed because reasonable people may always disagree, and that social-contract theory is irrelevant to the problem of the legitimacy of a form of government or of a system of moral rules. I note the weakness of the appeal to implicit agreement, the conflation of legitimacy with stability, the undesirability of “public justification” and the apparent blindness to the evolutionary critical-rationalist approach of Hayek and Popper. I employ that approach to sketch answers to the theoretical, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Barbara Fried (2003). "If You Don't Like It, Leave It": The Problem of Exit in Social Contractarian Arguments. Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (1):40–70.
  14. Norman Frohlich (1990). Social Contract, Free Ride: A Study of the Public Goods Problem, Anthony De Jassay. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989, Vi + 256 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 6 (02):327-.
  15. David Gauthier (1988). Hobbes's Social Contract. In G. A. J. Rogers & Alan Ryan (eds.), Perspectives on Thomas Hobbes. Oxford University Press. 71-84.
  16. Robert Ginsberg (1974). Kant and Hobbes on the Social Contract. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):115-119.
  17. Leslie Green (1990). The Authority of the State. Clarendon Press.
    The modern state claims supreme authority over the lives of all its citizens. Drawing together political philosophy, jurisprudence, and public choice theory, this book forces the reader to reconsider some basic assumptions about the authority of the state. -/- Various popular and influential theories - conventionalism, contractarianism, and communitarianism - are assessed by the author and found to fail. Leslie Green argues that only the consent of the governed can justify the state's claims to authority. While he denies that there (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jean Hampton (1988). Symposium Papers, Comments and an Abstract: Comments on "Hobbes' Social Contract". Noûs 22 (1):85-86.
  19. Jean Hampton (1986/1988). Hobbes and the Social Contract Tradition. Cambridge University Press.
    This major study of Hobbes's political philosophy draws on recent developments in game and decision theory to explore whether the thrust of the argument in Leviathan, that it is in the interests of the people to create a ruler with absolute power, can be shown to be cogent. Professor Hampton has written a book of vital importance to political philosophers, political and social scientists, and intellectual historians.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Russell Hardin (1991). Hobbesian Political Order. Political Theory 19 (2):156-180.
  21. Martin Harvey (2003). Classical Contractarianism. International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (4):477-502.
    The fundamental presupposition of political philosophy is that the legitimate rule of one individual over another requires justification: political power may come out of the barrel of a gun but political authority does not. Classically, the philosopher of politics looked to nature. In the seventeenth century, however, the philosophical tide turns in a decidedly different direction: contractarianism. Political society becomes a consensual construct created through the heuristic vehicle of a hypothetical social contract. Simultaneously, within the confines of contractarianism itself, a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Paul J. Johnson (1990). Hobbes and the Social Contract Tradition. International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):112-112.
  23. Matthias Kiesselbach (2011). Hobbes's Struggle with Contractual Obligation. On the Status of the Laws of Nature in Hobbes's Work. Hobbes Studies 23 (2):105-123.
    This paper argues that throughout his intellectual career, Hobbes remains unsatisfied with his own attempts at proving the invariant advisability of contract-keeping. Not only does he see himself forced to abandon his early idea that contractual obligation is a matter of physical laws. He also develops and retains doubts concerning its theoretical successor, the doctrine that the obligatoriness characteristic of contracts is the interest in self-preservation in alliance with instrumental reason - i.e. prudence. In fact, it is during his work (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jody S. Kraus (1993). The Limits of Hobbesian Contractarianism. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the most comprehensive, rigorous critique of contemporary Hobbesian contractarianism as expounded in the work of Jean Hampton, Gregory Kavka, and David Gauthier. Professor Kraus argues that the attempts by these three philosophers to use Hobbes to answer current political and moral questions fail. The reasons why they fail are related to fundamental problems intrinsic to Hobbesian contractarianism: first, the problem of collective action arising out of the tension in Hobbes' theory between individual and collective rationality; second, the (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jacob T. Levy, Not So.
    Social contract theory imagines political societies as resting on a fundamental agreement, adopted at a discrete moment in hypothetical time, that both bound individual persons together into a single polity and set fundamental rules regarding that polity's structure and powers. Written constitutions, adopted at real moments in historical time, dictating governmental structures, bounding governmental powers, and entrenching individual rights, look temptingly like social contracts reified. I argue in this article, however, that something essential is lost in the casual slippage between (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jacob T. Levy (2009). Not So Novus an Ordo: Constitutions Without Social Contracts. Political Theory 37 (2):191 - 217.
    Social contract theory imagines political societies as resting on a fundamental agreement, adopted at a discrete moment in hypothetical time, that binds individual persons together into a polity and sets fundamental rules regarding that polity's structure and powers. Written constitutions, adopted at real moments in historical time, dictating governmental structures, bounding governmental powers, and entrenching individual rights, look temptingly like social contracts reified. Yet something essential is lost in this slippage between social contract theory and the practice of constitutionalism. Contractarian (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. H. D. Lewis (1939). Plato and the Social Contract. Mind 48 (189):78-81.
  28. Matthew Lister (2009). Criminal Law Conversations: &Quot;dESERT: EMPIRICAL, NOT METAPHYSICAL" and "CONTRACTUALISM AND THE SHARING OF WRONGS&Quot;. In Paul Robinson, Kimberly Ferzan & Stephen Garvey (eds.), Criminal Law Conversations.
    Following are two short contributions to the book, _Criminal Law Conversations_: commentaries on Paul Robinson's discussion of "Empirical Desert" and Antony Duff & Sandra Marshal's discussion of the sharing of wrongs.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Nicolas Maloberti (2012). New Approaches to Classical Liberalism. Rationality, Markets and Morals 3:22-50.
    This article focuses on the following three novel and original philosophical approaches to classical liberalism: Den Uyl and Rasmussen’s perfectionist argument from meta-norms, Gaus’s justificatory model, and Kukathas’s conscience-based theory of authority. None of these three approaches are utilitarian or consequentialist in character. Neither do they appeal to the notion of a rational bargain as it is typical within contractarianism. Furthermore, each of these theory rejects the idea that classical liberalism should be grounded on considerations of interpersonal justice such as (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Stanley Williams Moore (1970). The Political Thought of John Locke: An Historical Account of the Argument of the 'Two Treatises of Government'. Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (3):345-347.
    This study provides a comprehensive reinterpretation of the meaning of Locke's political thought. John Dunn restores Locke's ideas to their exact context, and so stresses the historical question of what Locke in the Two Treatises of Government was intending to claim. By adopting this approach, he reveals the predominantly theological character of all Locke's thinking about politics and provides a convincing analysis of the development of Locke's thought. In a polemical concluding section, John Dunn argues that liberal and Marxist interpretations (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Tim O'Keefe (2001). Would a Community of Wise Epicureans Be Just? Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):133-146.
    I begin by considering an argument for why there would not be justice in a community of wise Epicureans: justice only exists where there is an agreement "neither to harm nor be harmed," and such an agreement would be superfluous in a community of wise Epicureans, since they would have no vain desires which would lead them to wish to harm one another. I argue that, if the 'justice contract' prohibits only direct harm of one person by another, then it (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jeffrey Paul (1983). Substantive Social Contracts and the Legitimate Basis of Political Authority. The Monist 66 (4):517-528.
  33. Paul Russell (1989). Hobbes and the Social Contract Tradition. Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (4):620-622.
  34. Wojciech Sadurski (1983). Contractarianism and Intuition (on the Role of Social Contract Arguments in Theories of Social Justice). Australasian Journal of Philosophy 61 (3):231 – 247.
    (1983). Contractarianism and intuition (On the role of social contract arguments in theories of social justice) Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 61, No. 3, pp. 231-247.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. D. F. Scheltens (1977). The Social Contract and the Principal of Law. International Philosophical Quarterly 17 (3):317-338.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Sheldon Wein (1986). Plato and the Social Contract. Philosophy Research Archives 12:67-77.
    This paper argues that Plato’s version of the contractarian theory of justice is superior to all other statements of that theory. The conditions any adequate theory of justice must meet are outlined and it is shown how contractarian theories attempt to meet these conditions. The great contractarian theories---those of Hobbes, Rousseau, Locke, Rawls, and Gauthier---are shown not to provide an adequate account of the nature of justice. The source of these failures is identified and, finally, it is shown that Plato’s (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jonathan Wolff (1993). Hume, Bentham, and the Social Contract. Utilitas 5 (1):87-.
    Hume famously argues that Social Contract theory collapses into a form of utilitarianism. Bentham endorses Hume's argument. I show that, if Hume's argument refutes Social Contract theory, it equally undermines Bentham's own utilitarian account of political obligation. This discussion is used to illustrate a more general thesis that there is no single problem of political obligation, but different problems for different theorists.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Contractualism about Political Authority
  1. Deborah Baumgold (2009). Hobbesian Absolutism and the Paradox of Modern Contractarianism. European Journal of Political Theory 8 (2):207-228.
    Hobbes's defense of absolutism involves the dual claims that consent is the foundation of legitimate authority and that sovereignty is necessarily absolute. It is a paradoxical combination of claims: If absolute government is the product of choice how can it also be the sole possible constitution? While all of Hobbes's contractarian successors have rejected his preference for absolutism, his dual claims have become commonplace. Since Hobbes, contract thinkers routinely assert that people will choose their preferred constitution and that it is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Kenneth Baynes (1989). Kant on Property Rights and the Social Contract. The Monist 72 (3):433-453.
  3. Corey Brettschneider (2011). Rights Within the Social Contract : Rousseau on Punishment. In Austin Sarat, Lawrence Douglas & Martha Merrill Umphrey (eds.), Law as Punishment/Law as Regulation. Stanford Law Books.
  4. Justin Cruickshank (2000). Ethnocentrism, Social Contract Liberalism and Positivistic-Conservatism: Rorty's Three Theses on Politics. Res Publica 6 (1):1-23.
    In this article I argue that Rorty has three separatearguments for liberalism. The pragmatic-ethnocentric argument for liberalism,as a system which works for `us liberals'', is rejectedfor entailing relativism. The social contract argument results in an extreme formof individualism. This renders politics redundantbecause there is no need for the (liberal) state toprotect poetic individuals, who are capable ofdefending themselves. Even if the less able areharmed, the state could not prevent this, givenRorty''s arguments about discursive enrichment withina language game. Finally, the positivistic-conservative (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Fred D'Agostino, John Thrasher & Gerald Gaus, Contemporary Approaches to the Social Contract. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  6. Stuart Dalton (1996). The General Will and the Legislator in Rousseau's on the Social Contract. Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (2):85-97.
  7. Samuel Richard Freeman (2007). Justice and the Social Contract: Essays on Rawlsian Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    John Rawls (1921-2002) was one of the 20th century's most important philosophers and continues to be among the most widely discussed of contemporary thinkers. His work, particularly A Theory of Justice, is integral to discussions of social and international justice, democracy, liberalism, welfare economics, and constitutional law, in departments of philosophy, politics, economics, law, public policy, and others. Samuel Freeman is one of Rawls's foremost interpreters. This volume contains nine of his essays on Rawls and Rawlsian justice, two of which (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Robert Garner (2012). Much Ado About Nothing?: Barry, Justice and Animals. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):363-376.
    This article examines the extent to which Brian Barry?s contractarian political theory ? justice as impartiality ? is able to incorporate the interests of animals. Despite the initial optimism that Barry might provide a theory of justice that can provide substantial protection for the interests of animals, it is clear that he offers relatively little. Insofar as animals can be protected within justice as impartiality, they are not being protected as a result of their intrinsic value, but merely as one, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. David P. Gauthier (2006). Rousseau: The Sentiment of Existence. Cambridge University Press.
    The distinguished philosopher David Gauthier examines Rousseau's evolving notion of freedom, particularly in his later works, where he focuses on a single quest: Can freedom and the independent self be regained? Rousseau's first answer is given in Emile, where he seeks to create a self-sufficient individual, neither materially nor psychologically enslaved to others. His second answer comes in the Social Contract, where he seeks to create a citizen who identifies totally with his community, so that he experiences his dependence on (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robert Ginsberg (1974). Kant and Hobbes on the Social Contract. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):115-119.
1 — 50 / 149