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  1. Peder Anker (2004). The Politics of Ecology in South Africa on the Radical Left. Journal of the History of Biology 37 (2):303-331.
    The South African ecologist and political activist Edward Roux used evolutionary biology to argue against racism. During the cold-war, he transformed his communist beliefs into advocacy for scientific rationalism, management, and protection of nature against advancing capitalism. These pleas for saving the environment served as a vehicle for questioning the more risky issue of evolution and racial order in society. The link between ecological and political order had long been an important theme among the country's ecologists and politicians alike. The (...)
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  2. Alejandro Arango (2016). Animal Groups and Social Ontology: An Argument From the Phenomenology of Behavior. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):403-422.
    Through a critical engagement with Merleau-Ponty’s discussion of the concepts of nature, life, and behavior, and with contemporary accounts of animal groups, this article argues that animal groups exhibit sociality and that sociality is a fundamental ontological condition. I situate my account in relation to the superorganism and selfish individual accounts of animal groups in recent biology and zoology. I argue that both accounts are inadequate. I propose an alternative account of animal groups and animal sociality through a Merleau-Pontian inspired (...)
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  3. Archie J. Bahm (1979). Marx and Engels on Ecology. Environmental Ethics 1 (3):283-285.
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  4. Kathleen Baker (2000). Ecological Possibilities and Political Constraints : Adjustments of Farming to Protracted Drought by Women and Men in the Western Division of the Gambia. In Philip Anthony Stott & Sian Sullivan (eds.), Political Ecology: Science, Myth and Power. Oxford University Press 157--178.
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  5. Uma Balakrishnan, Tim Duvall & Patrick Primeaux (2003). Rewriting the Bases of Capitalism: Reflexive Modernity and Ecological Sustainability as the Foundations of a New Normative Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 47 (4):299 - 314.
    The debate on sustainable globalized development rests on two clearly stated economic assumptions: that "development" proceeds, solely and inevitably, through industrialization and the proliferation of capital intensive high-technology, towards the creation of service sector economies; and that globalization, based on a neoliberal, capitalist, free market ideology, provides the only vehicle for such development. Sustainability, according to the proponents of globalized development, is merely a function of market forces, which will generate the solutions for all problems including the environmental dilemmas that (...)
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  6. Jerome Barkow (2003). Biology is Destiny Only If We Ignore It. World Futures 59 (3 & 4):173 – 188.
    Problems of sustainability and survivability are best met not with moralizing but with policies that take advantage of our increasingly understood evolved human psychology. This knowledge helps us understand why our problems recur, and why we need not expect them to have permanent solutions. What is needed is an evolutionary praxis. It is possible, for example, to create policies that work around our tendencies to hierarchize and to form into ethnocentric and mutually hostile groups. Although in many ways there may (...)
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  7. Amitrajeet A. Batabyal (1999). Richard Peet and Michael Watts (Eds.), Liberation Ecologies: Environment, Development, Social Movements. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (1):87-88.
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  8. Amitrajeet A. Batabyal (1998). Ecology and Economics of the Great Plains by Daniel S. Licht. Agriculture and Human Values 15 (3):283-284.
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  9. Brian Baxter (2000). Ecologism: An Introduction. Georgetown University Press.
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  10. Ruth Beilin (2011). Paige West, Conservation is Our Government Now: The Politics of Ecology in Papua New Guinea. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (1):75-85.
    Paige West, Conservation is our Government Now: The Politics of Ecology in Papua New Guinea Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-11 DOI 10.1007/s10806-010-9239-5 Authors Ruth Beilin, University of Melbourne Department of Resource Management and Geography, Melbourne School of Land and Environment Melbourne 3010 Australia Journal Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics Online ISSN 1573-322X Print ISSN 1187-7863 Journal Volume Volume Journal Issue Volume.
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  11. Jeremy Bendik-Keymer (2003). The Idea of an Ecological Orientation. Social Philosophy Today 19:55-63.
    In this paper, I do two things. First, I interpret a cultural shift in our understanding of what it is to be human. I focus on the self-understanding in three international documents: (1) The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), (2) The Rio Charter on Sustainable Development (1992), and (3) The Earth Charter (2002). These documents are symptomatic: what it is to be human shifts from not considering environmental issues as central to our humanity to understanding respect for the environment (...)
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  12. Brett M. Bennett (2011). A Global History of Australian Trees. Journal of the History of Biology 44 (1):125 - 145.
    Scholars studying the globalization of Australian trees have previously emphasized the rapid natural propagation of Australian trees outside of their native habitats, believing their success to be a reversal of "ecological imperialism" from the "new world" to the "old world." This article argues that the expansion of Australian trees should not be viewed as a biological phenomenon, but as the result of a long-term attempt by powerful states and state-sponsored scientists to select and breed Australian species that could grow in (...)
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  13. Daniel Berthold-Bond (1994). Can There Be a “Humanistic” Ecology? Social Theory and Practice 20 (3):279-309.
    The article engages the current debate between humanistic' and anti-humanistic' alternatives for an ecological philosophy by putting Heidegger and Hegel into dialogue. It is argued that Heidegger's portrait of Hegel's philosophy as a form of humanism' which foreshadows the modern logic of domination and exploitation of nature is highly misleading. Hegel's humanistic' position can allow for a genuinely ecological vision of nature, which, while not as radically ecological as Heidegger's, may in fact avoid some of the problems of Heidegger's view.
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  14. Roy Bhaskar (2011). Ecophilosophy in a World of Crisis: Critical Realism and the Nordic Contributions. Routledge.
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  15. Andrew Biro (2003). Ecology and Historical Materialism. Environmental Ethics 25 (1):109-110.
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  16. Paul Burkett (2002). Analytical Marxism and Ecology: A Rejoinder. Historical Materialism 10 (1):177-192.
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  17. Seamus Carey (2003). An Ethics of Place: Radical Ecology, Postmodernity, and Social Theory. Environmental Ethics 25 (4):417-420.
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  18. Alan Carter (1995). Deep Ecology or Social Ecology? Heythrop Journal 36 (3):328–350.
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  19. V. Cheshko & O. Kuss (2016). Bio-power and bio-policy: Anthropological and socio-political dimensions of techno-humanitarian balance. Hyleya 107 (4):267-272.
    The sociobiological and socio-political aspects of human existence have been the subject of techno-rationalistic control and manipulation. The investigation of the mutual complementarity of anthropological and ontological paradigms under these circumstances is the main purpose of present publication. The comparative conceptual analysis of the bio-power and bio-politics in the mentality of the modern technological civilization is a main method of the research. The methodological and philosophical analogy of biological and social engineering allows combining them in the nature and social implications (...)
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  20. Helena Ciążela, Must Democratic Ecology Be Anthropocentric? Reflections on Luc Ferry's Concepts.
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  21. John P. Clark, A Social Ecology.
    community reflecting on itself, uncovering its history, exploring its present predicament, and contemplating its future. [2] One aspect of this awakening is a process of philosophical reflection. As a philosophical approach, a social ecology investigates the ontological, epistemological, ethical and political dimensions of the relationship between the social and the ecological, and seeks the practical wisdom that results from such reflection. It seeks to give us, as beings situated in the course of real human and natural history, guidance in facing (...)
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  22. Peter Dickens (2007). Marx and the Metabolism Between Humanity and Nature: Review of Marx and Nature: A Red and Green Perspective_ by Paul Burkett and _Marx's Ecology: Materialism and Nature by John Bellamy Foster. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 3 (2).
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  23. Martin Drenthen (2010). NIMBY and the Ethics of the Particular. Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):321-323.
    In “Why Not NIMBY?” Derek Turner and Simon Feldman fail to address that many NIMBY protesters are not just concerned with concrete decision making, but also introduce a ‘metaphysical’ issue that liberal-democracy considers an inappropriate subject for the political debate. The type of rationality dominating political discourse requires one to reason in terms of 'common good' or personal preferences that can be weighted against other preferences. NIMBY’s do neither; rather they reframe the debate, starting from a radically different approach to (...)
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  24. Frederick Ferré (1982). Ecology and the Politics of Scarcity: Prologue to a Political Theory of the Steady State. Environmental Ethics 4 (1):85-87.
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  25. John Bellamy Foster (2008). The Dialectics of Nature and Marxist Ecology. In Bertell Ollman & Tony Smith (eds.), Dialectics for the New Century. Palgrave Macmillan
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  26. Benjamin James Fraser (2014). Mind the Gap(S): Sociality, Morality, and Oxytocin. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 29 (1):143-150.
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  27. Ivan Timofeevich Frolov (ed.) (1989). Ecological Knowledge in Perspective: Social-Philosophical Problems. Nauka Publishers.
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  28. Grant Gillett (1991). Language, Social Ecology and Experience. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (3):195 – 203.
    Abstract Experience is structured by thoughts which are composed of general concepts and conceptions of objects. Both of these elements of thought are rule?governed and rest on norms which are shared by thinkers. Concepts and conceptions of objects as the elements of thoughts whose content is essentially communicable plausibly rest on abilities tied to the use of linguistic terms. This suggests that language plays an active part in structuring human experience and cognition as suggested by both Vygotsky and Luria. The (...)
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  29. Mara Goldman, Paul Nadasdy & Matt Turner (eds.) (2011). Knowing Nature: Conversations at the Intersection of Political Ecology and Science Studies. University of Chicago Press.
    Knowing Nature brings together political ecologists and science studies scholars to showcase the key points of encounter between the two fields and how this ...
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  30. Heidi E. Grasswick (2008). From Feminist Thinking to Ecological Thinking: Determining the Bounds of Community. Hypatia 23 (1):150-160.
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  31. Benjamin Hale (2005). Experience and the Environment: Phenomenology Returns to Earth. [REVIEW] Human Studies 28 (1):101 - 106.
  32. Benjamin E. Hardisty & Deby L. Cassill (2010). Extending Eusociality to Include Vertebrate Family Units. Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):437-440.
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  33. Jonathan Hughes (2001). A Revolutionary Ecology. [REVIEW] Imprints 5 (2):161-172.
  34. Jonathan Hughes (2000). Ecology and Historical Materialism. Cambridge University Press.
    This book challenges the widely-held view that Marxism is unable to deal adequately with environmental problems. Jonathan Hughes considers the nature of environmental problems, and the evaluative perspectives that may be brought to bear on them. He examines Marx's critique of Malthus, his method, and his materialism, interpreting the latter as a recognition of human dependence on nature. Central to the book's argument is an interpretation of the 'development of the productive forces' which takes account of the differing ecological impacts (...)
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  35. Sarah Jewitt & Sanjay Kumar (2000). A Political Ecology of Forest Management : Gender and Silvicultural Knowledge in the Jharkhand, India. In Philip Anthony Stott & Sian Sullivan (eds.), Political Ecology: Science, Myth and Power. Oxford University Press
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  36. Hwa Yol Jung (1983). Marxism, Ecology, and Technology. Environmental Ethics 5 (2):169-171.
    The recent controversy over whether Marxism is an ecologically viable theory or can justify astate of harmony between man and nature has a serious flaw because none of the participants in the discussion seems to think that technology is intrinsic to the reconciliation of man with nature. While it is correct that the writings of the early Marx offer some basis for the reconciliation, the later Marx was preoccupiedwith the question of nature’s instrumentality or the human significance of nature, and (...)
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  37. Douglas Kellner, Marcuse, Liberation, and Radical Ecology.
    Herbert Marcuse's late 1970s essay "Ecology and the Critique of Modern Society," written shortly before his death in 1979 and published here for the first time, articulates his vision of liberation and sense of the importance of ecology for the radical project. The essay argues that genuine ecology requires a transformation of human nature, as well as the preservation and protection of external nature from capitalist and state communist pollution and destruction. Rooting his vision of human liberation in the Frankfurt (...)
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  38. Jozef Keulartz (1998). Struggle for Nature: A Critique of Radical Ecology. Routledge.
    The Struggle for Nature outlines and examines the main aspects of current environmental philosophy including deep ecology, social and political ecology, eco-feminism and eco-anarchism. It criticizes the dependency on science of these philosophies and the social problems engendered by them. Jozef Keulartz argues for a post-naturalistic turn in environmental philosophy. The Struggle for Nature presents the most up-to-date arguments in environmental philosophy, which will be valuable reading for anyone interested in applied philosophy, environmental studies or geography.
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  39. Mark Lacy (2001). Social Ecology After Bookchin. Environmental Ethics 23 (1):81-82.
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  40. Andrew Light (2004). Marcuse's Deep-Social Ecology and the Future of Utopian Environmentalism. In John Abromeit & W. Mark Cobb (eds.), Herbert Marcuse: A Critical Reader. Routledge
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  41. G. Lilburne (1997). Book Reviews : Ecology and Liberation: A New Paradigm, by Leonardo Boff, Translated From the Italian by John Cumming. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books/Leominster: Fowler Wright, 1995. Xii + 187 Pp. Pb. 9.99. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 10 (1):103-106.
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  42. Richard Madsen (1999). Community, Civil Society, and Social Ecology. In Josef Janning, Charles Kupchan & Dirk Rumberg (eds.), Civic Engagement in the Atlantic Community. Bertelsmann Foundation Publishers
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  43. Carolyn Merchant (2005). Radical Ecology: The Search for a Livable World. Routledge.
    In the first edition of Radical Ecology --the now classic examination major philosophical, ethical, scientific, and economic roots of environmental problems--Carolyn Merchant responded to the profound awareness of environmental crisis which prevailed in the closing decade of the twentieth century. In this provocative and readable study, Merchant examined the ways that radical ecologists can transform science and society in order to sustain life on this planet. Now in this second edition, Merchant continues to emphasize how laws, regulations and scientific research (...)
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  44. Alfonso Montuori (1993). Evolutionary Learning for a Post-Industrial Society: Knowledge, Creativity & Social Ecology. World Futures 36 (2):181-202.
    (1993). Evolutionary learning for a post‐industrial society: Knowledge, creativity & social ecology. World Futures: Vol. 36, Evolutionary Consciousness, pp. 181-202.
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  45. Erin Christine Moore (2009). Integral Ecology: Uniting Multiple Perspectives on the Natural World, Sean Esbjörn-Hargens & Michael Zimmerman. Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (3):369-371.
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  46. Yolanda Flores Niemann & Paul F. Secord (1995). Social Ecology of Stereotyping. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (1):1–13.
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  47. J. O'Neill, Ecology, Socialism and Austrian Economics.
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  48. John O'Neill, Socialist Calculation and Environmental Valuation: Money, Markets and Ecology.
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  49. Max Oelschlaeger (1993). History, Ecology, and the Denial of Death: A Re-Reading of Conservation, Sexual Personae, and the Good Society. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (3):19-39.
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  50. Mika Pantzar (1993). Do Commodities Reproduce Themselves Through Human Beings? Toward an Ecology of Goods. World Futures 38 (4):201-224.
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