This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
370 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 370
  1. Robert Ackermann (1989). Playing Fair with Experiments: A Reply to Pitt and Westrum. Social Epistemology 3 (1):63 – 65.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert Ackermann (1988). Experiment as the Motor of Scientific Progress. Social Epistemology 2 (4):327 – 335.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Evandro Agazzi (2008). Epistemology and the Social: A Feedback Loop. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 96 (1):19-31.
    A sociological study of science is not very recent and has never been seen as particularly problematic since science, and especially modern science, constitutes an impressive and extremely ramified "social system" of activities, institutions, relations and interferences with other social systems. Less favourable, however, has been the consideration of a more recent trend in the philosophy of science known as the "sociological" philosophy of science, whose most debatable point consists in directly challenging the traditional epistemology of science and, in particular, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Evandro Agazzi, Javier Echeverría & Amparo Gómez Rodríguez (2008). Epistemology and the Social. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 96 (1):7-16.
    These are some of the topics discussed in this book, both theoretically and with reference to concrete cases.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (2012). Why Deliberative Democracy is (Still) Untenable. Public Affairs Quarterly 26 (3):199-220.
    A common objection to deliberative democracy is that available evidence on public ignorance makes it unlikely that social deliberation among the public is a process likely to yield accurate outputs. The present paper considers—and ultimately rejects—two responses to this objection. The first response is that the correct conclusion to draw from the evidence is simply that we must work harder to ensure that the deliberative process improves the deliberators’ epistemic situation. The main problem for this response is that there are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Scott F. Aikin (2008). Perelmanian Universal Audience and the Epistemic Aspirations of Argument. Philosophy and Rhetoric 41 (3):pp. 238-259.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Scott Aikin & John Casey (2011). Straw Men, Weak Men, and Hollow Men. Argumentation 25 (1):87-105.
    Three forms of the straw man fallacy are posed: the straw, weak, and hollow man. Additionally, there can be non-fallacious cases of any of these species of straw man arguments.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Morana Ala (2004). Negotiating Pictures of Numbers. Social Epistemology 18 (2 & 3):199 – 214.
    This paper reports on objectivity and knowledge production in the process of submitting, revising, and publishing an experimental research article in cognitive neuroscience. The review process, as part of scientific practice, is of particular interest, since it puts the research team in direct dialog with a larger scientific community concerned with fMRI evidence. By bringing this often 'black-boxed' dimension of the manuscript's production into the picture, I illustrate the role that the visual brain representations played in the practice of scientific (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Randall Albury (1987). The Author Responds: Albury to Fuller. Social Epistemology 1 (4):363 – 364.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Linda Martin Alcoff (2000). On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? In Naomi Zack (ed.), On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant? Wiley-Blackwell. 235-262.
  11. Carl Martin Allwood (2002). Indigenized Psychologies. Social Epistemology 16 (4):349 – 366.
    In this paper the nature of the indigenized psychologies is discussed. The ongoing development of indigenized psychologies is an important phenomenon that gives rise to many important and interesting questions, not the least of which concerns the conditions for the development and transfer of traditions of understanding between different social and cultural contexts. The indigenized psychologies are distinguished by being reactions to what is seen as modern mainstream western (US) psychology, by being (more or less) anchored in the identified culture (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Carl Martin Allwood & Jan Bärmark (1999). The Role of Research Problems in the Process of Research. Social Epistemology 13 (1):59 – 83.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. David Altheide & Pat Lauderdale (1987). The Technocratic Form in the Study of Mass Media Effects: An Application. Social Epistemology 1 (2):183 – 186.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Elizabeth Anderson (2012). Epistemic Justice as a Virtue of Social Institutions. Social Epistemology 26 (2):163-173.
    In Epistemic injustice, Miranda Fricker makes a tremendous contribution to theorizing the intersection of social epistemology with theories of justice. Theories of justice often take as their object of assessment either interpersonal transactions (specific exchanges between persons) or particular institutions. They may also take a more comprehensive perspective in assessing systems of institutions. This systemic perspective may enable control of the cumulative effects of millions of individual transactions that cannot be controlled at the individual or institutional levels. This is true (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Elizabeth Anderson (2008). An Epistemic Defense of Democracy: David Estlund's Democratic Authority. Episteme 5 (1):pp. 129-139.
    In Democratic Authority, David Estlund 2008 presents a major new defense of democracy, called epistemic proceduralism. The theory claims that democracy exercises legitimate authority in virtue of possessing a modest epistemic power: its decisions are the product of procedures that tend to produce just laws at a better than chance rate, and better than any other type of government that is justifiable within the terms of public reason. The balance Estlund strikes between epistemic and non-epistemic justifications of democracy is open (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Frederick Antczak (1994). Hearing Our Cassandras: Ethical Criticism and Rhetorical Receptions of Paul Ehrlich. Social Epistemology 8 (3):281 – 288.
    (1994). Hearing our cassandras: Ethical criticism and rhetorical receptions of Paul Ehrlich. Social Epistemology: Vol. 8, Public Indifference to Population Issues, pp. 281-288.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Michael V. Antony (1993). Social Relations and the Individuation of Thought. Mind 102 (406):247-61.
    Tyler Burge has argued that a necessary condition for individual's having many of the thoughts he has is that he bear certain relations to other language users. Burge's conclusion is based on a thought experiment in which an individual's social relations are imagined, counterfactually, to differ from how they are actually. The result is that it seems, counterfactually, the individual cannot be attributed many of the thoughts he can be actually. In the article, an alternative interpretation of Burge's thought experiment (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Steglich-Petersen Asbjørn (forthcoming). The Epistemology of the Precautionary Principle: Two Puzzles Resolved. Erkenntnis.
    In a recent paper in this journal (forthcoming), Carter and Peterson raise two distinctly epistemological puzzles that arise for anyone aspiring to defend the precautionary principle. The first puzzle trades on an application of epistemic contextualism to the precautionary principle; the second puzzle concerns the compatibility of the precautionary principle with the de minimis rule. I argue that neither puzzle should worry defenders of the precautionary principle. The first puzzle can be shown to be an instance of the familiar but (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Malcolm Ashmore (1989). The Reflexive Thesis: Wrighting Sociology of Scientific Knowledge. University of Chicago Press.
    This unusually innovative book treats reflexivity, not as a philosophical conundrum, but as a practical issue that arises in the course of scholarly research and argument. In order to demonstrate the concrete and consequential nature of reflexivity, Malcolm Ashmore concentrates on an area in which reflexive "problems" are acute: the sociology of scientific knowledge. At the forefront of recent radical changes in our understanding of science, this increasingly influential mode of analysis specializes in rigorous deconstructions of the research practices and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. William J. Ashworth (2004). Practical Objectivity: The Excise, State, and Production in Eighteenth Century England. Social Epistemology 18 (2 & 3):181 – 197.
    During eighteenth century England the Excise Department was at the vanguard of negotiating the criteria and parameters of what I call "practical objectivity", namely, putting objectivity into administrative practice. This frequently required both the space of production and the actual product to be reconfigured to meet the criteria of the excise's form of measurement. As this essay shows this was a contested, mutable and ambiguous process. Within this context ultimate agreement over objectivity was administratively rather than philosophically driven.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Harvey Averch (1990). Provocation on the Politics of Government-Funded Research. Part. Social Epistemology 4 (1):127 – 129.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Guy Axtell (2011). Recovering Responsibility. Logos and Episteme (3):429-454..
    This paper defends the epistemological importance of ‘diachronic’ or cross-temporal evaluation of epistemic agents against an interesting dilemma posed for this view in Trent Dougherty’s recent paper “Reducing Responsibility.” This is primarily a debate between evidentialists and character epistemologists, and key issues of contention that the paper treats include the divergent functions of synchronic and diachronic (longitudinal) evaluations of agents and their beliefs, the nature and sources of epistemic normativity, and the advantages versus the costs of the evidentialists’ reductionism about (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Guy Axtell (1994). The Professional Quest for Truth by Stephan Fuchs. Social Epistemology 8 (1):69 – 80.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Harriet Erica Baber (2008). The Multicultural Mystique: The Liberal Case Against Diversity. Prometheus Books.
    Introduction: is multiculturism good for anyone? -- Do people like their cultures? -- A philosophical prelude: what is multiculturalism? -- The costs of multiculturalism -- The diversity trap: why everybody wants to be an X -- White privilege and the asymmetry of choice -- Communities: respecting the establishment of religion -- Multiculturalism and the good life -- The cult of cultural self-affirmation -- Identity-making -- Identity politics: the making of a mystique -- Policy.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Zaheer Baber (2005). Underdog Epistemologies and the Muscular, Masculine of Science Hindutva. Social Epistemology 19 (1):93 – 98.
    The rise of chauvinist, bigoted and sectarian politics in India coincided with the critique and blanket dismissal of modern science by some Indian intellectuals. The elective affinities between these two developments and the larger global intellectual and politial context have been analyzed in great detail by Meera Nanda. This paper provides a critical examination and appreciation of the enormous intellectual and political significance of Nanda's work.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Zaheer Baber (2003). The Taming of Science and Technology Studies. Social Epistemology 17 (2 & 3):95 – 98.
    Discusses the use by several philosophers of the book "The Structure of Scientific Revolutions," by philosopher Thomas S. Kuhn, as an intellectual source for attacking the sociology of science proposed by Robert K. Merton and his students. Assertion by Kuhn that the philosophers attacking Merton had misconstructed his ideas; Sociology of Kuhnian sociology of science established by Steve Fuller.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Arnaldo Bagnasco (2003). Social Capital in Changing Capitalism. Social Epistemology 17 (4):359 – 380.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Brian Baigrie (1989). A Symposium on the Role of the Philosopher Among the Scientists: Nuisance or Necessity? Social Epistemology 3 (4):311 – 318.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Brian Baigrie (1989). Popper and Progress: A Reply to Campbell. Social Epistemology 3 (1):65 – 69.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Brian Baigrie (1988). Why Evolutionary Epistemology is an Endangered Theory. Social Epistemology 2 (4):357 – 369.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Alison Bailey (2010). On Intersectionality and the Whiteness of Feminist Philosophy. In George Yancy (ed.), THE CENTER MUST NOT HOLD: WHITE WOMEN PHILOSOPHERS ON THE WHITENESS OF PHILOSOPHY. Lexington Books.
    In this paper I explore some possible reasons why white feminists philosophers have failed to engage the radical work being done by non-Western women, U.S. women of color and scholars of color outside of the discipline. -/- Feminism and academic philosophy have had lots to say to one another. Yet part of what marks feminist philosophy as philosophy is our engagement with the intellectual traditions of the white forefathers. I’m not uncomfortable with these projects: Aristotle, Foucault, Sartre, Wittgenstein, Quine, Austin, (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. David Bakhurst (2013). Learning From Others. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):187-203.
    John McDowell begins his essay ‘Knowledge by Hearsay’ (1993) by describing two ways language matters to epistemology. The first is that, by understanding and accepting someone else's utterance, a person can acquire knowledge. This is what philosophers call ‘knowledge by testimony’. The second is that children acquire knowledge in the course of learning their first language—in acquiring language, a child inherits a conception of the world. In The Formation of Reason (2011), and my writings on Russian socio-historical philosophy and psychology, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Nathan Ballantyne (2013). Counterfactual Philosophers. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 87 (2):368-387.
    I argue that reflection on philosophers who could have been working among us but aren’t can lead us to give up our philosophical beliefs.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Daniel Bar-Tal & Arie W. Kruglanski (eds.) (1988). The Social Psychology of Knowledge. Editions De La Maison des Sciences De L'Homme.
    This collection, published in 1988, brings an innovative perspective to research in social cognition.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Barry Barnes (2003). Sad Reflections on Our Times. Social Epistemology 17 (2 & 3):115 – 118.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Barry Barnes (1977). Interests and the Growth of Knowledge. Routledge and K. Paul.
    THE PROBLEM OP KNOWLEDGE l CONCEPTIONS OF KNOWLEDGE An immediate difficulty which faces any discussion of the present kind is that there are so many ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Ronald Barnett (1998). Supercomplexity and the University. Social Epistemology 12 (1):43 – 50.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Pierluigi Barrotta (2003). The Social Dimension of Science. Social Epistemology 17 (2 & 3):119 – 125.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Thomas D. Barton (1999). Law and Science in the Enlightenment and Beyond. Social Epistemology 13 (2):99 – 112.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Thomas Basbøll (2012). The Supplementary Clerk: Social Epistemology as a Vocation. Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):435-451.
    The production and circulation of scholarly texts have long been at the center of the theoretical concerns of social epistemologists. In this essay, Foucault?s notion of an ?archive,? a set of practices that operates between the corpus and the language to produce ?statements,? is used to identify a site for a practicing (as distinct from theorizing) social epistemologist. By supporting the efforts of researchers to publish their work, and hence participate in the conversations that define their area of expertise, social (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Harry Bash (1989). An Exchange on Vertical Drift and the Quest for Theoretical Integration in Sociology. Social Epistemology 3 (3):229 – 246.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Wenda Bauchspies (2000). Images of Mathematics in Togo, West Africa. Social Epistemology 14 (1):43 – 53.
    On a stroll down a neighbourhood street in Togo, one is likely to see: little boys playing with homemade toys that roll and can be pushed with a stick or pulled on a string; girls helping their mother around the house and tending younger siblings; men sitting chatting with friends, smoking and playing dice games or zipping by on a variety of two-wheelers; women waiting at the pump for their turn to fill their basins before 2 p.m. when the pump (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Charles Bazerman (1995). Influencing and Being Influenced: Local Acts Across Large Distances. Social Epistemology 9 (2):189 – 199.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Charles Bazerman (1987). Literate Acts and the Emergent Social Structure of Science: A Critical Synthesis. Social Epistemology 1 (4):295 – 310.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Valentín A. Bazhanov (2008). Social Milieu and Evolution of Logic, Epistemology, and the History of Science: The Case of Marxism. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 96 (1):157-169.
    The impact of social factors upon the philosophical investigations in a broad sense is quite evident. Nevertheless their impact upon epistemology as a branch of philosophy, logic, and history of science as fields of research with noticeable philosophical content is not evident enough. We are keen to claim that this impact exists within some limits, although it is not so overtly evident. Moreover in the case of Marxism it is of a paradoxical nature. Marxism always puts the accent on the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Tony Becher (1995). Metaphysics, Metaphors and Microcosms. Social Epistemology 9 (3):277 – 285.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. James R. Beebe (2001). Interpretation and Epistemic Evaluation in Goldman's Descriptive Epistemology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (2):163-186.
    One branch of Alvin Goldman's proposed "scientific epistemology" is devoted to the scientific study of how folk epistemic evaluators acquire and deploy the concepts of knowledge and justified belief. The author argues that such a "descriptive epistemology," as Goldman calls it, requires a more sophisticated theory of interpretation than is provided by the simulation theory Goldman adopts. The author also argues that any adequate account of folk epistemic concepts must reconstruct the intersubjective conceptual roles those concepts play in discursive practices. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Endre Begby (2013). The Epistemology of Prejudice. Thought 2 (1):90-99.
    According to a common view, prejudice always involves some form of epistemic culpability, i.e., a failure to respond to evidence in the appropriate way. I argue that the common view wrongfully assumes that prejudices always involve universal generalizations. After motivating the more plausible thesis that prejudices typically involve a species of generic judgment, I show that standard examples provide no grounds for positing a strong connection between prejudice and epistemic culpability. More generally, the common view fails to recognize the extent (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Marc Bekoff (1999). Social Cognition: Exchanging and Sharing Information on the Run. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 51 (1):617-632.
    In this essay I consider various aspects of the rapidly growing field of cognitive ethology, concentrating mainly on evolutionary and comparative discussion of the notion of intentionality. I am not concerned with consciousness, per se, for a concentration on consciousness deflects attention from other, and in many cases more interesting, problems in the study of animal cognition. I consider how, when, where, and (attempt to discuss) why individuals from different taxa exchange social information concerning their beliefs, desires, and goals. My (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Lisa D. Bendixen & Florian C. Feucht (2010). Personal Epistemology in the Classroom: What Does Research and Theory Tell Us and Where Do We Need to Go Next? In Lisa D. Bendixen & Florian C. Feucht (eds.), Personal Epistemology in the Classroom: Theory, Research, and Implications for Practice. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 370