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  1. Elisa Aaltola (2005). Two Aspects of Ecopolitics: Animal Rights Activism and Environmental. In Cassandra Star (ed.), Transforming Environmental Governance for the 21st Century.
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  2. Felicia Ackerman (1996). What Is the Proper Role for Charity in Healthcare? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (3):425.
    My little girl has leukemia; she has had it for over a year, and now she needs at least five pints of blood a day. Not the whole blood, just the platelets. Most of our relatives and friends have given at least a few times. But we need more. Now I have to go to strangers.So begins Roberta Silman's short story, “Giving Blood,” a story about illness and charity. When the narrator's husband solicited blood donations at his workplace, “he thought (...)
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  3. Jonny Anomaly (forthcoming). Trust, Trade, and Moral Progress. Social Philosophy and Policy.
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  4. Robert Audi (2014). Church-State Separation, Healthcare Policy, and Religious Liberty. Journal of Practical Ethics 2 (1).
    This paper sketches a framework for the separation of church and state and, with the framework in view, indicates why a government’s maintaining such separation poses challenges for balancing two major democratic ideals: preserving equality before the law and protecting liberty, including religious liberty. The challenge is particularly complex where healthcare is either provided or regulated by government. The contemporary problem in question here is the contraception coverage requirement in the Obama Administration’s healthcare mandate. Many institutions have mounted legal challenges (...)
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  5. H. E. Baber, Freedom That Matters.
    Ideologues of the American Dream doctrine assume that state intervention aimed at providing social safety nets for citizens and reducing economic inequality, restricts freedom and undermines individual opportunity. This assumption is the result of empirical misinformation and, more fundamentally, a conceptual mistake. Robust empirical data indicate that economic equality, far from stifling initiative or undermining opportunity, is conducive to social mobility.
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  6. Robert Bass, Small Contributions.
    Many of the world's problems--severe poverty and starvation, global warming, religious war, oppressive and tyrannical regimes--are large, well beyond what any ordinary person might have a significant impact upon. We are at most in a position to make small contributions. This fact is behind a seductive argument: there is nothing we can do about the large problems; since we cannot do anything about the large problems, it is not true that we ought to do anything; therefore, we can, in good (...)
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  7. Simon Beck (2011). Can Parables Work? Philosophy and Theology 23 (1):149-165.
    While theories about interpreting biblical and other parables have long realised the importance of readers’ responses to the topic, recent results in social psychology concerning systematic self-deception raise unforeseen problems. In this paper I first set out some of the problems these results pose for the authority of fictional thought-experiments in moral philosophy. I then consider the suggestion that biblical parables face the same problems and as a result cannot work as devices for moral or religious instruction in the way (...)
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  8. David Benatar (2014). Taking Humour (Ethics) Seriously, But Not Too Seriously. Journal of Practical Ethics 2 (1):24-43.
    Humour is worthy of serious ethical consideration. However, it is often taken far too seriously. In this paper, it is argued that while humour is sometimes unethical, it is wrong much less often than many people think. Non-contextual criticisms, which claim that certain kinds of humour are always wrong, are rejected. Contextual criticisms, which take issue with particular instances of humour rather than types of humour, are more promising. However, it is common to overstate the number of contexts in which (...)
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  9. J. S. Blumenthal-Barby (2012). Seeking Better Health Care Outcomes: The Ethics of Using the “Nudge”. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (2):1-10.
    Policymakers, employers, insurance companies, researchers, and health care providers have developed an increasing interest in using principles from behavioral economics and psychology to persuade people to change their health-related behaviors, lifestyles, and habits. In this article, we examine how principles from behavioral economics and psychology are being used to nudge people (the public, patients, or health care providers) toward particular decisions or behaviors related to health or health care, and we identify the ethically relevant dimensions that should be considered for (...)
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  10. Leonardo Caffo (ed.) (2011). Soltanto Per Loro. Un Manifesto Per l'Animalità Attraverso la Politica E la Filosofia. Aracne.
    Anno dopo anno miliardi di animali non umani vengono uccisi per diversi scopi: nutrimento, abbigliamento, ricerca e divertimento. Una situazione analoga, ma con gli umani per oggetto, non sarebbe ovviamente tollerata; ma perché tolleriamo - e anzi giustifichiamo - una pratica e non l'altra? La risposta non è per nulla banale e ci spinge a guardare oltre il vivere quotidiano attraverso un percorso filosofico e politico.
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  11. Michael Cholbi (2009). On Hazing. Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (2):143-159.
    Hazing is a widespread moral phenomenon that has attracted little theoretical discussion. Here are my purposes are two fold: First, I provide a characterization of hazing that captures the features relevant to analyzing and evaluating hazing from a moral point of view. Hazing is harmful or humiliating transaction between members of a coveted group and an individual seeking membership in said group where the transaction bears no intrinsic relationship to the group’s mission. Second, I provide an analysis of the moral (...)
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  12. Stephen R. L. Clark (1998). Dangerous Conservatives: A Reply to Daniel Dombrowski. Sophia 37 (2):44-69.
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  13. Stephen R. L. Clark (1990). Notes on the Underground. Inquiry 33 (1):27 – 37.
    The victory of Ellerman's technetronic civilization is indeed a fearful prospect, but one that is much less plausible than he allows. His imagined makers, as was pointed out forty odd years ago by C. S. Lewis, could themselves have no criterion of right action or right belief, nor could they sensibly expect ? either on secular or on thcistic suppositions ? to be able to control the world forever.
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  14. Andrew Jason Cohen (2010). A Conceptual and (Preliminary) Normative Exploration of Waste. Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (2):233-273.
    In this paper, I first argue that waste is best understood as (a) any process wherein something useful becomes less useful and that produces less benefit than is lost—where benefit and usefulness are understood with reference to the same metric—or (b) the result of such a process. I next argue for the immorality of waste. My concluding suggestions are that (W1) if one person needs something for her preservation and a second person has it, is avoidably wasting it, and refuses (...)
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  15. Rory J. Conces (2009). Epistemical and Ethical Troubles in Achieving Reconciliation, and Then Beyond. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 5 (1):25-47.
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  16. Rory J. Conces (2007). Tarifa’s Exposition of the Kanun: Something for Sociologists and Philosophers Alike. Sociological Analysis 1:125-27.
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  17. John Corcoran (1989). The Inseparability of Logic and Ethics. Free Inquiry 9 (2):37-40.
    This essay takes logic and ethics in broad senses: logic as the science of evidence; ethics as the science justice. One of its main conclusions is that neither science can be fruitfully pursued without the virtues fostered by the other: logic is pointless without fairness and compassion; ethics is pointless without rigor and objectivity. The logician urging us to be dispassionate is in resonance and harmony with the ethicist urging us to be compassionate.
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  18. John Corcoran & William Frank (2014). COSMIC JUSTICE HYPOTHESES. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 20:247-248.
    Cosmic Justice Hypotheses. -/- This applied-logic lecture builds on [1] arguing that character traits fostered by logic serve clarity and understanding in ethics, confirming hopeful views of Alfred Tarski [2, Preface, and personal communication]. Hypotheses in one strict usage are propositions not known to be true and not known to be false or—more loosely—propositions so considered for discussion purposes [1, p. 38]. Logic studies hypotheses by determining their implications (propositions they imply) and their implicants (propositions that imply them). Logic also (...)
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  19. Kyla Ebels-Duggan (2013). Moral Education in the Liberal State. Journal of Practical Ethics 1 (2):24-63.
    I argue that political liberals should not support the monopoly of a single educational approach in state sponsored schools. Instead, they should allow reasonable citizens latitude to choose the worldview in which their own children are educated. I begin by defending a particular conception of political liberalism, and its associated requirement of public reason, against the received interpretation. I argue that the values of respect and civic friendship that motivate the public reason requirement do not support the common demand that (...)
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  20. G. M. Eller (2014). On Fat Oppression. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (3):219-245.
    Contemporary Western societies are obsessed with the “obesity epidemic,” dieting, and fitness. Fat people violate the Western conscience by violating a thinness norm. In virtue of violating the thinness norm, fat people suffer many varied consequences. Is their suffering morally permissible, or even obligatory? In this paper, I argue that the answer is no. I examine contemporary philosophical accounts of oppression and draw largely on the work of Sally Haslanger to generate a set of conditions sufficient for some phenomena to (...)
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  21. Eva Erman (2005). Human Rights and Democracy: Discourse Theory and Human Rights Institutions. Ashgate.
    This volume explores the relationship between human rights and democracy within both the theoretical and empirical field.
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  22. Montague Fowler (1910). The Morality of Social Pleasures.
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  23. Anca Gheaus (2015). Unfinished Adults and Defective Children: On the Nature and Value of Childhood. Journal for Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (1):1-21.
    Traditionally, most philosophers saw childhood as a state of deficiency and thought that its value was entirely dependent on how successfully it prepares individuals for adulthood. Yet, there are good reasons to think that childhood also has intrinsic value. Children possess certain intrinsically valuable abilities to a higher degree than adults. Moreover, going through a phase when one does not yet have a “self of one’s own,” and experimenting one’s way to a stable self, seems intrinsically valuable. I argue that (...)
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  24. Azam Golam (2010). Distribution of Health Care Resources in LIC: A Utilitarian Approach. VDM Verlag Dr. Müller.
    Distribution of sufficient health care resources to the maximum number of people in LIC is the central theme of the book. Bangladesh is taken as a representative of low income countries (LIe. In LIC, there is scarcity of health care resources like other resources but the deserving persons are numerous. Therefore, it requires an efficient distribution of resources. Considering 'Inequality to get access to health care' as the basic problem in LIC, John Rawls' principle of fair equality of opportunity is (...)
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  25. Azam Golam (2008). Rawls’ Theory of Distributive Justice and the Role of Informal Institutions in Giving People Access to Health Care in Bangladesh. Philosophy and Progress 41 (2):151-167.
    The objective of the paper is to explore the issue that despite the absence of adequate formal and systematic ways for the poor and disadvantaged people to get access to health benefit like in a rich liberal society, there are active social customs, feelings and individual and collective responsibilities among the people that help the disadvantaged and poor people to have access to the minimum health care facility in both liberal and non-liberal poor countries. In order to explain the importance (...)
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  26. Maurice Hamington & Dorothy C. Miller (eds.) (2006). Socializing Care: Feminist Ethics and Public Issues. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Contributors to this volume demonstrate how the ethics of care factors into a variety of social policies and institutions, and can indeed be useful in thinking about a number of different social problems. Divided into two sections, the first looks at care as a model for an evaluative framework that rethinks social institutions, liberal society, and citizenship at a basic conceptual level. The second explores care values in the context of specific social practices or settings, as a framework that should (...)
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  27. Shriniwas श्रीनिवास Hemade हेमाडे (June 2013). Master Day : Teachers Day मास्तर - डे ! Philosophical Explorations.:166-193.
    This article is about Master's degree. It's history, Philosophy and use of today.
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  28. Cressida J. Heyes (2006). Changing Race, Changing Sex: The Ethics of Self-Transformation. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (2):266-282.
  29. Stephen R. C. Hicks (2002). Free Speech and Postmodernism. Navigator.
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  30. Christine James (2012). Prisons for Profit in the United States: Retribution and Means Vs. Ends. Journal for Human Rights 6 (1):76-93.
    The recent trend toward privately owned and operated prisons calls attention to a variety of issues involving human rights. The growing number of corporatized correctional institutions is especially notable in the United States, but it is also a global phenomenon in many countries. The reasons cited for privatizing prisons are usually economic; the opportunity to outsource prison services enables local political leaders to save tax revenue, and local communities are promised a chance to create new jobs and bring in a (...)
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  31. Taraneh Javanbakht (2011). Ethics according to Rousseau and Voltaire. Journal of New Philosophy 1:34-37.
    In this paper, the ethics of Rousseau and Voltaire are compared.
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  32. Steve Jones (2010). ‘Implied…or Implode?’: The Simpsons' Carnivalesque Treehouse of Horror Specials. Animation 18.
    Since 1990, The Simpsons’ annual “Treehouse of Horror” episodes have constituted a production sub-context within the series, having their own conventions and historical trajectory. These specials incorporate horror plots and devices, as well as general references to science fiction, into the series’ base in situation comedy. The Halloween specials disrupt the series usual family-oriented sitcom structure, dissolving the ideological balances that stabilise that society. By depicting the Family and community in extreme circumstances, in seeing the horror of ‘how things could (...)
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  33. Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach (2015). Wie lassen sich liberale Ideale auch auf Immigrierte ausweiten? Eine erste Skizze. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 69 (3):326-346.
    Im vorliegenden Aufsatz geht es um neue, bisher nicht dagewesene Auslegungen liberaler Ideale. Zum einen soll untersucht werden, ob neue Interpretationen liberaler Ideale erfasst werden können, wenn man den kollektiven Blick von spezifischen, historisch situierten, politischen Gemeinschaften einnimmt. Zum anderen soll der Frage nachgegangen werden, ob staatliche Maßnahmen zur Behebung struktureller Ungleichheit womöglich bewirken können, dass liberale Ideale auf neue Weise ausgelegt werden. Der Klarheit halber bilden Immigrierte, die sich bereits innerhalb liberaler Gemeinwesen befinden und sich dort legal aufhalten, den (...)
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  34. Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach (2005). Toleranz im interkulturellen Kontext. Bautz.
    Im allgemeinen Sprachgebrauch ist Toleranz eine unverzichtbare Tugend, durch die die Konflikthaftigkeit menschlicher Interaktionen in Zaum gehalten werden kann. In pluralistischen Gesellschaften soll Toleranz ferner eine gute Grundlage für ein friedliches Zusammenleben der unterschiedlichen Gruppierungen bieten. Auch im interkulturellen Kontext soll Toleranz für eine reibungslose Begegnung zwischen Mitgliedern unterschiedlicher Kulturen sorgen. Doch wie ist Toleranz im interkulturellen Kontext zu verstehen? Ist Toleranz eine Duldung des Mitgliedes einer anderen Kultur? Ist Toleranz eine Aufforderung dazu, den Anderen und seine Andersartigkeit zu ertragen? (...)
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  35. Chris A. Kramer (2015). Subversive Humor. Dissertation, Marquette
    Oppression is easily recognized. That is, at least, when oppression results from overt, consciously professed racism, for example, in which violence, explicit exclusion from economic opportunities, denial of adequate legal access, and open discrimination perpetuate the subjugation of a group of people. There are relatively clear legal remedies to such oppression. But this is not the case with covert oppression where the psychological harms and resulting legal and economic exclusion are every bit as real, but caused by concealed mechanisms subtly (...)
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  36. Hugh LaFollette (1994). Mandatory Drug Testing. In S. Luper & C. Brown (eds.), Drugs, Morality, and the Law. Garland
    By some estimates one-third of American corporations now require their employees to be tested for drug use. These requirements are compatible with general employment law while promoting the public's interest in fighting drug use. Moreover, the United States Supreme Court has ruled that drug testing programs are constitutionally permissible within both the public and the private sectors. It appears mandatory drug testing is a permanent fixture of American corporate life. (Bakaly, C. G., Grossman, J. M. 1989).
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  37. Bartlomiej Lenart & Miranda Koshelek (2015). Human Rights and Access to Information. Progressive Librarian (43).
    Unresolved disagreements on issues of access, censorship, and privacy within the information profession can be dangerous when entrepreneurial interests outweigh the public good and as corporations anticipate financial gain from placing limitations on information retrieval and use. The information profession can benefit from a grounding of its core values in a robust moral framework that can coherently place demands on interested parties. We argue that grounding the core values of privacy and ubiquitous access to information in a needs-based theory of (...)
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  38. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2004). Rhetoric and Anti-Semitism. Academic Questions 17 (2):22-32.
    Given that charges of anti-Semitism, racism, and the like continue to be potent weapons of moral and intellectual critique in our culture, it is important that we work toward a clear understanding about just what sorts of conduct and circumstances constitute these moral offenses. In particular, can criticism of a state (such as Israel), or other social or political institution or organization (such as the NAACP), ever amount to anti-Semitism, racism, or other bigotry against the people represented by or associated (...)
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  39. Judith Lichtenberg (2002). Racism in the Head, Racism in the World. In Galston Gehring (ed.), Philosophical Dimensions of Public Policy. 91-96.
  40. S. Luper & C. Brown (eds.) (1994). Drugs, Morality, and the Law. Garland.
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  41. Erich Hatala Matthes (forthcoming). Cultural Appropriation Without Cultural Essentialism? Social Theory and Practice 42 (2).
    Is there something morally wrong with cultural appropriation in the arts? I argue that the little philosophical work on this topic has been overly dismissive of moral objections to cultural appropriation. Nevertheless, I argue that philosophers working on epistemic injustice have developed powerful conceptual tools that can aid in our understanding of objections that have been levied by other scholars and artists. I then consider the relationship between these objections and the harms of cultural essentialism. I argue that focusing on (...)
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  42. Steve Matthews (2010). Anonymity and the Social Self. American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):351 - 363.
    We will analyze the concept of anonymity, along with cognate notions, and their relation to privacy, with a view to developing an understanding of how we control our identity in public and why such control is important in developing and maintaining our social selves. We will take anonymity to be representative of a suite of techniques of nonidentifiability that persons use to manage and protect their privacy. At the core of these techniques is the aim of being untrackable; this means (...)
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  43. Kristie Miller (2014). Conditional and Prospective Apologies. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):403-417.
    IntroductionThe possibility of prospective apologies has been ignored and conditional apologies have typically been thought to be insincere, deceptive, or at the very least, not meaningful. In large part this is because authors have attended to a particular suite of psychological features of those who issue an apology, and the presence of this suite of features has been taken to provide evidence that an apology is meaningful, while the absence of said psychological features is taken to provide evidence that the (...)
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  44. Daniel Moseley (forthcoming). Review of Robert Kane, "Ethics and the Quest for Wisdom.". [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    Kane's ambitious and bold book presents a sustained argument for an ethical theory that gives an account of right action and the good life. The general structure of the main argument is presented and specific points are critically discussed.
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  45. Nicholas John Munn (2012). Reconciling the Criminal and Participatory Responsibilities of the Youth. Social Theory and Practice 38 (1):139-159.
    This article examines the setting of the ages of criminal and participatory responsibility, noting that criminal responsibility is attributed significantly earlier than is participatory responsibility. I claim that the requirements for participatory responsibility are less onerous than those for criminal responsibility, and question the system that denies youth participatory responsibility. I suggest two methods of resolving this difficulty. First, lowering the voting age to enfranchise the capable youth who are currently excluded. Second, modeling criminal responsibility on the Australian (...)
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  46. Ulrik Becker Nissen (2011). Responsibility and Responsiveness. Reflections on the Communicative Dimension of Responsibility. Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 53 (1):90-108.
    The debate on the role and identity of Christian social ethics in liberal democracy touches upon the question about the relationship between universality and specificity. Rather than argue for the difference between these approaches, it can be argued that they are to be understood in a differentiated unity with each other. This idea can be substantiated by a figurative appropriation of a Chalcedonian Christology, particularly the communicatio idiomatum . The communicative dimension of this concept has been found to be useful (...)
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  47. Steven W. Patterson (2004). Kreacher's Lament: SPEW as a Parable on Discrimination, Indifference, and Social Justice. In David Baggett, Shawn E. Klein & William Irwin (eds.), Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts. Chicago: Open Court 105--117.
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  48. Ruel F. Pepa, Nineteen Eighty-Four or Brave New World?
    In both paradigm-shaping novels, the central issue is the human person: Is s/he an autonomous being, that is a “being-for-itself” (with apologies to Jean-Paul Sartre) endowed with free-will and the inherent power to organize and hence determine her/his future? Or, is s/he solely a physico-mechanical “object” whose ideas, thoughts, feelings and decisions are just by-products of her/his physico-chemical constitution, genetic configuration and environmental conditioning? From where does s/he draw the meaningfulness of her/his life? Or perhaps the more fundamental question is: (...)
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  49. Michel Puech (2010). The Four Cultures: Hybridizing Science and Humanities, East and West. In Center for Applied Ethics and Philosophy (ed.), Applied Ethics: Challenges for the 21st Century. , Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan 27--35.
    The purpose of this paper is to elaborate hypotheses and to indicate research tracks. It leads to a research program and not to final conclusions. It tries to inspire and comfort philosophers who do not feel at ease in a compartmentalized culture. 1. Four Cultures, One Predicament 2. Resources 3. Domains 4. Concluding Remarks: Applied Ethics, Wisdom Ethics.
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  50. Gabriel Rockhill & Summer Renault-Steele (2012). Critical Leverage in the Current Conjuncture: A Dialogue with Gabriel Rockhill Concerning Politics of Culture and the Spirit of Critique. Phaenex 7 (1):347-364.
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