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  1. Avshalom Madhala Adam & Tal Shavit (2008). How Can a Ratings-Based Method for Assessing Corporate Social Responsibility (Csr) Provide an Incentive to Firms Excluded From Socially Responsible Investment Indices to Invest in Csr? Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):899 - 905.
    Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) indices play a major role in the stock markets. A connection between doing good and doing well in business is implied. Leading indices, such as the Domini Social Index and others, exemplify the movement toward investing in socially responsible corporations. However, the question remains: Does the ratings-based methodology for assessing corporate social responsibility (CSR) provide an incentive to firms excluded from SRI indices to invest in CSR? Not in its current format. The ratings-based methodology employed by (...)
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  2. Luis Ferruz Agudo, Isabel Marco Sanjuán & Fernando Muñoz Sánchez (2009). Fondos de inversión éticos, ecológicos y socialmente responsables en Europa (1999-2007). Aposta: Revista de Ciencias Sociales 41:4.
    The main objective of this piece of work is to reflect upon the evolution of the socially responsible mutual funds industry in Europe over the recent years. In order to do this, we shall analyse the evolution of the number of ethical funds offered, the growth of its assets, its size, the typology of commercialised funds, and the main companies included in its investment portfolios, showing the importance that socially responsible mutual funds are gaining in Europe over these first few (...)
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  3. Rob Bauer, Jeroen Derwall & Rogér Otten (2007). The Ethical Mutual Fund Performance Debate: New Evidence From Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (2):111 - 124.
    Although the academic interest in ethical mutual fund performance has developed steadily, the evidence to date is mainly sample-specific. To tackle this critique, new research should extend to unexplored countries. Using this as a motivation, we examine the performance and risk sensitivities of Canadian ethical mutual funds vis-à-vis their conventional peers. In order to overcome the methodological deficiencies most prior papers suffered from, we use performance measurement approaches in the spirit of Carhart (1997, Journal of Finance 52(1): 57–82) and Ferson (...)
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  4. Sebastian Beloe (2001). A Responsible Investment?—An Overview of the Socially Responsible Investment Community. World Futures 56 (4):409-416.
    (2001). A responsible investment?—an overview of the socially responsible investment community. World Futures: Vol. 56, Values, Ethics and Econmics, Part II, pp. 409-416.
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  5. Elias Bengtsson (2008). A History of Scandinavian Socially Responsible Investing. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):969 - 983.
    This article contributes to the literature on national varieties of socially responsible investment (SRI) by demonstrating how Scandinavian SRI developed from the 60s and onwards. Combining findings on Scandinavian SRI with insights from previous research and institutional theory, the article accounts for the role of changes in societal values and norms, the mechanisms by which SRI practices spread, and how investors adopt and transform practices to suit their surrounding institutional contexts. Especially, the article draws attention to how different categories of (...)
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  6. Tim Benijts (2010). A Framework for Comparing Socially Responsible Investment Markets: An Analysis of the Dutch and Belgian Retail Markets. Business Ethics 19 (1):50-63.
    The increasing popularity of socially responsible investment among individual investors throughout Europe reveals the need for a framework that allows the comparison of socially responsible retail markets in different European countries. This article proposes such a framework, containing 16 different characteristics of socially responsible retail markets describing the size, institutionalization and nature of this market and correcting for differences in the size of countries and financial markets. When this framework was applied to the Dutch and Belgian socially responsible retail markets, (...)
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  7. Karen L. Benson, Timothy J. Brailsford & Jacquelyn E. Humphrey (2006). Do Socially Responsible Fund Managers Really Invest Differently? Journal of Business Ethics 65 (4):337 - 357.
    To date, research into socially responsible investment (SRI), and in particular the socially responsible investment funds industry, has focused on whether investing in SRI assets has any differential impact on investor returns. Prior findings generally suggest that, on a risk-adjusted basis, there is no difference in performance between SRI and conventional funds. This result has led to questions about whether SRI funds are really any different from conventional funds. This paper examines whether the portfolio allocation across industry sectors and the (...)
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  8. Gerald J. Beyer (2013). Workers' Rights and Socially Responsible Investment in the Catholic Tradition. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 10 (1):117-153.
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  9. James A. Brander (2006). The Effect of Ethical Fund Portfolio Inclusion on Executive Compensation. Journal of Business Ethics 69 (4):317 - 329.
    This paper divides firms in the Standard and Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) into two groups based on inclusion in or exclusion from the Domini Social Index (DSI). Inclusion in the DSI is interpreted as a positive indicator of ethical status. Using data for the 1992–2003 period, I provide evidence that chief executive officer (CEO) compensation, other executive compensation, and director compensation tend to be lower in DSI firms than in other firms in the S&P 500. This applies to the unconditional (...)
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  10. Tim Cadman (2011). The Legitimacy of ESG Standards as an Analytical Framework for Responsible Investment. In Wim Vandekerckhove, Jos Leys, Kristian Alm, Bert Scholtens, Silvana Signori & Henry Schäfer (eds.), Responsible Investment in Times of Turmoil. Springer. 35--53.
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  11. Gordon L. Clark (2000). Moral Sentiments and Reciprocal Obligations: The Case for Pension Fund Investment in Community Development. Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (1):7 – 24.
    Squeezed between increasing entitlement expenditures and static or declining real revenues, state-funded urban development is increasingly perceived as an unaffordable luxury. At the same time, the power and significance of the banking sector is giving way to new kinds of financial institutions that have little or no interest in community development. Not surprisingly, it is often argued that pension funds ought to be more sensitive to community needs. However, some analysts argue that pension funds are properly only the agents of (...)
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  12. Maria Ceu Cortez, Florinda Silva & Nelson Areal (2009). The Performance of European Socially Responsible Funds. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):573 - 588.
    Recent years have witnessed an increasing growth in mutual funds that invest according to social criteria. As a consequence, the financial performance of these portfolios has attracted the interest of academics and practitioners. This paper investigates the performance of a sample of socially responsible mutual funds from seven European countries investing globally and/or in the European market. Using unconditional and conditional models, we assess the performance of these funds in comparison to conventional and socially responsible benchmark portfolios. The results show (...)
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  13. Christopher Cowton (1999). Playing by the Rules: Ethical Criteria at an Ethical Investment Fund. Business Ethics 8 (1):60–69.
    Although ethical investment is a growing phenonenon which attracts a signficant amount of media interest, relatively little has been written about the internal operations of ethical investment funds. Using a variety of sources, including interviews with a fund manager and participant observation at meetings of the fund’s ethical advisory committee, this paper examines the decision making of one ethical unit trust operating in the United Kingdom. In particular, it describes the development of the ethical criteria and the ways in which (...)
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  14. Christopher J. Cowton & Joakim Sandberg (2012). Socially Responsible Investment. In Ruth Chadwick (ed.), Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics, 2nd ed. Academic Press.
    Socially responsible investment (SRI) – sometimes termed “ethical investment” – refers to the practice of integrating social, environmental, or ethical criteria into financial investment decisions. Whereas conventional investment focuses upon financial risk and return from stocks and bonds, SRI includes other goals or constraints. It is the nature of the source, and not just the size, of the financial return that is of concern in SRI. This article introduces the principal investment strategies generally pursued under SRI, and then focuses specifically (...)
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  15. Paul Cox, Stephen Brammer & Andrew Millington (2004). An Empirical Examination of Institutional Investor Preferences for Corporate Social Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):27-43.
    This study investigates the pattern of institutional shareholding in the U.K. and its relationship with socially responsible behavior by companies within a sample of over 500 UK companies. We estimate a set of ownership models that distinguish between long- and short-term investors and their largest components and which incorporate both aggregated and disaggregated measures of corporate social performance (CSP). The results suggest that long-term institutional investment is positively related to CSP providing further support for earlier studies by Johnson and Greening (...)
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  16. Douglas Cumming & Sofia Johan (2007). Socially Responsible Institutional Investment in Private Equity. Journal of Business Ethics 75 (4):395 - 416.
    This article studies institutional investor allocations to the socially responsible asset class. We propose two elements influence socially responsible institutional investment in private equity: internal organizational structure, and internationalization. We study socially responsible investments from Dutch institutional investments into private equity funds, and compare socially responsible investment across different asset classes and different types of institutional investors (banks, insurance companies, and pension funds). The data indicate socially responsible investment in private equity is 40–50% more common when the decision to implement (...)
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  17. Simone de Colle & Jeffrey G. York (2009). Why Wine is Not Glue? The Unresolved Problem of Negative Screening in Socially Responsible Investing. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):83–95.
    The purpose of socially responsible investing (SRI) is to: (1) allow investors to reflect their personal values and ethics in their choices, and (2) encourage companies to improve their ethical, social, and environmental performance. In order to achieve these ends, the means SRI fund managers employ include the use of negative screening, or the exclusion of companies involved in “sinful” industries. We argue that there are problems with this methodology, both at a theoretical and at a practical level. As a (...)
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  18. Stephen Dillenburg, Timothy Greene & O. Homer Erekson (2003). Approaching Socially Responsible Investment with a Comprehensive Ratings Scheme: Total Social Impact. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (3):167 - 177.
    The socially responsible investment industry (SRI) is slowly changing from a screening, avoidance paradigm to a comprehensive paradigm that seeks to affect corporate behavior. Credible rating systems are a key component of this sea change. Reliable and recognizable social and environmental metrics are critical to this progress. The Total Social Impact (TSI) rating approach is a new social metric scheme based on a comprehensive rating of stakeholder issues. This paper describes the evolution of SRI ratings and the role that TSI (...)
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  19. S. Prakash Sethi Donald H. Schepers (2003). Bridging the Gap Between the Promise and Performance of Socially Responsible Funds. Business and Society Review 108 (1):11-32.
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  20. Christel Dumas & Céline Louche (2011). Mimetic Proceses in Responsible Investment Mainstreaming. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:234-245.
    In this paper, we compare and contrast institutional theory and convention theory on the concept of mimetism, suggesting how they can cross-pollinate each other and more specifically how the self-referential quality of collective beliefs improves the understanding of mimetic isomorphism. We test this proposition with the case of responsible investment’s mainstreaming.First level results decompose the history of RI into five successive periods. A content analysis of articles on RI in the financial press leads to second level results consisting in a (...)
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  21. Neil Eccles (2011). New Values in Responsible Investment. In Wim Vandekerckhove, Jos Leys, Kristian Alm, Bert Scholtens, Silvana Signori & Henry Schäfer (eds.), Responsible Investment in Times of Turmoil. Springer. 19--34.
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  22. Neil Stuart Eccles (2010). UN Principles for Responsible Investment Signatories and the Anti-Apartheid SRI Movement: A Thought Experiment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):415 - 424.
    There appears to be a growing disquiet amongst academics surrounding the ascendancy of 'responsible' investment that is egoist or self-interested in character — 'business case' responsible investment. This ascendancy has in no small measure been associated with the uptake of United Nations Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) as a de facto standard for mainstream responsible investment. This article contributes to this disquiet. It does this by examining how egoist 'responsible' investors (as endorsed by the PRI) might have behaved had they (...)
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  23. Angeles Fernandez-Izquierdo & Juan Carlos Matallin-Saez (2008). Performance of Ethical Mutual Funds in Spain: Sacrifice or Premium? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):247 - 260.
    There is currently much debate in the economic literature about whether ethical investment involves a financial sacrifice or premium. One of the most common methods of testing this compares the financial performance of ethical investment funds with that of other funds not considered “socially responsible” or ethical. The majority of these research studies evaluate the performance of the ethical funds according to classic measures, whereby different financial markets, in different countries and for different periods of time serve as reference for (...)
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  24. Luis Ferruz, Fernando Muñoz & María Vargas (2012). Managerial Abilities: Evidence From Religious Mutual Fund Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):503-517.
    In this study, we analyze the financial performance and the managerial abilities of religious mutual fund managers, implementing a comparative analysis with conventional mutual funds. We use a broad sample, free of survivorship bias, of religious equity mutual funds from the US market, for the period from January 1994 to September 2010. We build a matched-pair conventional sample in order to compare the results obtained for both kinds of mutual fund managers. We analyze stock-picking and market timing abilities, topics widely (...)
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  25. Luis Ferruz, Fernando Muñoz & Maria Vargas (2010). Stock Picking, Market Timing and Style Differences Between Socially Responsible and Conventional Pension Funds: Evidence From the United Kingdom. Business Ethics 19 (4):408-422.
    As far as we are aware, this study presents the first comparative analysis of the stock picking and market timing abilities of managers of conventional and socially responsible (SR) pension funds, and of their use of superior information. For the United Kingdom, the results obtained show a slight stock picking ability on the part of SR pension fund managers (although it disappears if multifactorial models are considered), and a negative market timing ability on the part of both SR and conventional (...)
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  26. Stanley F. Fox (1991). Socially Responsible Investing: Can It Produce Acceptable Investment Results? Dissertation, Walden University
    There are investors, who out of their concern regarding adverse changes in our environment, concerns for justice, and because of their opposition to the arms race, decline to purchase the securities of enterprises that engage in what are termed socially irresponsible activities. Such activities usually include, but are not necessarily limited to, the production of armaments, alcohol and tobacco; engaging in activities that degrade the environment; and engaging in activities that treat people unfairly. ;Declining to invest in the securities of (...)
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  27. Javier Gil-Bazo, Pablo Ruiz-Verdú & André A. P. Santos (2010). The Performance of Socially Responsible Mutual Funds: The Role of Fees and Management Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):243 - 263.
    In this article, we shed light on the debate about the financial performance of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds by separately analyzing the contributions of before-fee performance and fees to SRI funds' performance, and by investigating the role played by fund management companies in the determination of those variables. We apply the matching estimator methodology to obtain our results and find that in the period 1997–2005, US SRI funds had better beforeand after-fee performance than conventional funds with similar characteristics. (...)
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  28. Katherina Glac (2009). Understanding Socially Responsible Investing: The Effect of Decision Frames and Trade-Off Options. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):41 - 55.
    Over the past two decades, the phenomenon of socially responsible investing has become more widespread. However, knowledge about the individual socially responsible investor is largely limited to descriptive and comparative accounts. The question of "why do some investors practice socially responsible investing and others don't?" is therefore still largely unanswered. To address this shortcoming in the current literature, this paper develops a model of the decision to invest socially responsibly that is grounded in the cognition literature. The hypotheses proposed in (...)
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  29. Jean-Pascal Gond, Céline Louche, Rieneke Slager, Carmen Juravle & Camilla Yamahaki (2011). The Institutional and Social Contruction of Responsible Investment. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:524-531.
    This paper provides a summary of the symposium on the institutional and social construction of Responsible Investment (RI), held at the 22nd IABS conference. In the context of the symposium, we propose to move beyond the dominant focus on the financial impact of RI to consider the potential of emergent institutional and sociological perspectives to explain the practices and concepts related to RI. In doing so, our aim is to explore in greater detail the current changes in the RI infrastructure (...)
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  30. Terrence Guay, Jonathan P. Doh & Graham Sinclair (2004). Non-Governmental Organizations, Shareholder Activism, and Socially Responsible Investments: Ethical, Strategic, and Governance Implications. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):125-139.
    In this article, we document the growing influence of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the realm of socially responsible investing (SRI). Drawing from ethical and economic perspectives on stakeholder management and agency theory, we develop a framework to understand how and when NGOs will be most influential in shaping the ethical and social responsibility orientations of business using the emergence of SRI as the primary influencing vehicle. We find that NGOs have opportunities to influence corporate conduct via direct, indirect, and interactive (...)
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  31. Matthew Haigh, Social Investment: Subjectivism, Sublation and the Moral Elevation of Success.
    Investment products that deploy ethical values and social considerations in portfolio construction have persisted since the 1980s. Pitting Habermasian discourse ethics against Foucauldian power relations and radical institutionalism, the paper argues that socially directed mutual funds ascribe capital markets with validities of high moral magnitude, work up extant tendencies toward financial hegemony and stymie criticism of the political-economic order. Institutional pressures do not permit the exercise of an ethic stronger than an aesthetic care of the self. The balance struck between (...)
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  32. Matthew Haigh & Frank JanGraaf and, The Implications of Reform-Oriented Investment for Regulation and Governance.
    Emergent practices of reform-oriented shareholder engagement are characterised as a professional social movement which gains credibility by influencing the institutional networks imbricating investors. The limitations of structuralist and atomistic tendencies in social movement analysis are resolved with an inductive, dialectical approach which is used to illustrate two cases of internal attempts to change investment policy at pension funds. Linkages are identified between organizational responses to pressure for change, and mobilization strategies of embedded proponents of change. The paper urges the involvement (...)
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  33. Matthew Haigh & James Hazelton (2004). Financial Markets: A Tool for Social Responsibility? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):59-71.
    Objectives of socially responsible investment (SRI) are discussed with reference to the two main mechanisms of the SRI ‘movement’: shareholder advocacy and managed investments. We argue that in their current forms, both mechanisms lack the power to create significant corporate change. Shareholder advocacy has been largely unsuccessful to date. Even if resolutions were successful, shareholder advocacy may still be ineffective if underlying economic opportunities remain. Marketing material and investment prospectuses issued by socially responsible mutual funds (SRI funds) commonly contain the (...)
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  34. Sirkku Hellsten & Chris Mallin (2006). Are 'Ethical' or 'Socially Responsible' Investments Socially Responsible? Journal of Business Ethics 66 (4):393 - 406.
    In this article we discuss whether it pays to invest ethically. Our aim is to examine corporate social responsibility from philosophical, moral and practical points of views. We focus on two main issues related to ethical investments. Firstly we discuss the moral dilemma of how capitalism has changed its shape in today’s world and from ‘blaming the business’ there is a general attempt to use the markets to promote ethics values and corporate social responsibility. Secondly, we analyze the growth of (...)
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  35. Kai Hockerts & Lance Moir (2004). Communicating Corporate Responsibility to Investors: The Changing Role of the Investor Relations Function. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):85-98.
    Based on an inductive study we analyse the role of the investor relations (IR) function in the light of rising investor concern about corporate social responsibility (CSR). The study draws on interviews with IR professionals in twenty firms. It highlights their awareness of CSR issues as well as their assessment of concern among mainstream investors and socially responsible investors (SRIs). From these findings we develop suggestions on how the IR function is moving from a mere “broadcasting” mode regarding CSR issues (...)
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  36. Richard Hudson & Roger Wehrell (2005). Socially Responsible Investors and the Microentrepreneur: A Canadian Case. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (3):281 - 292.
    Socially responsible investors buy financial securities with two goals: to make a market-based return, and to make companies act in a more socially responsible way. Most research on socially responsible investment deals with investing in stocks traded on major exchanges. We add the case of loaning small amounts of funds to microentrepreneurs through a discussion of a particular case. The case is that of Calmeadow which, in conjunction with the Royal Bank of Canada, set up a microlending project in rural (...)
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  37. R. Bruce Hutton, Louis D'Antonio & Tommi Johnsen (1998). Socially Responsible Investing Growing Issues and New Opportunities. Business and Society 37 (3):281-305.
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  38. William B. Irvine (1987). The Ethics of Investing. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (3):233 - 242.
    In this paper, I examine various popular notions concerning the ethics of investing. I first consider and reject the absolutist view that it is always wrong to invest in evil companies and the view that what makes investments in evil companies morally objectionable is the fact that by making such investments, investors are taking steps to benefit from the wrongdoing of others. I then defend the view that what makes certain investments morally objectionable is the fact that by making such (...)
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  39. Carlos Joly (2011). Reality and Potential of Responsible Investment. In Wim Vandekerckhove, Jos Leys, Kristian Alm, Bert Scholtens, Silvana Signori & Henry Schäfer (eds.), Responsible Investment in Times of Turmoil. Springer. 193--210.
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  40. Carlos Joly (1993). FOCUS: Ethical Demands and Requirements in Investment Management. Business Ethics 2 (4):199–212.
    Investment Management makes heavy ethical demands which are not an optional add‐on, but part of the job of being a financial agent and fiduciary. The author is founder and President of Skandia Fonds, the Norwegian mutual funds management company affiliated with Skandia Group which pioneered the concept of green mutual funds in Norway. This paper was delivered at the Sixth Annual Conference of the European Business Ethics Network, held in Oslo last month. Its views are those of the author, and (...)
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  41. Stewart Jones, Sandra van der Laan, Geoff Frost & Janice Loftus (2008). The Investment Performance of Socially Responsible Investment Funds in Australia. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):181 - 203.
    Interest in the notion of the possible financial sacrifice suffered by socially responsible investment (SRI) fund investors for considering ethical, social and environmental issues in their investment decisions has spawned considerable academic interest in the performance of SRI funds. Both the Australian and international research literature have yielded largely mixed results. However, several of these studies are hampered by methodological problems which can obscure the significance of reported results, such as the use of small sample sizes, inconsistencies in the time (...)
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  42. Carmen Juravle & Alan Lewis (2008). Identifying Impediments to Sri in Europe: A Review of the Practitioner and Academic Literature. [REVIEW] Business Ethics 17 (3):285–310.
    For more than 15 years, the investment community and the academic community have written extensively on socially responsible investment (SRI). Despite the abundance of SRI thought, the adoption of SRI practices among institutional investors is a comparative rarity. This paper endeavours to achieve two goals. First, by integrating the practitioner and academic literature on the topic, the paper attempts to identify the many impediments to SRI in Europe from an institutional investor's perspective. Second, the paper proposes a unitary framework to (...)
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  43. MarÍa Rosario Balaguer Franch Laura Albareda VivÓ (2009). The Challenges of Socially Responsible Investment Among Institutional Investors: Exploring the Links Between Corporate Pension Funds and Corporate Governance. Business and Society Review 114 (1):31-57.
    ABSTRACTDuring the last few decades, globalization of finance markets has come under increasing pressure to manage the many risks that companies face due to the negative impact that certain financial crises have had on securities quoted on the stock exchange. Simultaneously, there is a growing tendency among different institutional investors to take into account nonfinancial aspects—social, environmental, and ethical values—of company management. In this respect, increasing numbers of asset managers are aware of the importance of nonfinancial aspects of company management (...)
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  44. Alan Lewis & Carmen Juravle (2010). Morals, Markets and Sustainable Investments: A Qualitative Study of 'Champions'. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (3):483 - 494.
    Sustainable investment (SI), which integrates social, environmental and ethical issues, has grown from a niche market of individual ethical investors to embrace institutional investors (e.g. pension funds) resulting in £764 billion in assets under management in the UK alone [Eurosif, 2008 : ‘European SRI Study 2008’ (Eurosif, Paris)]. Explaining this growth is complex, involving shifts in personal and collective values, reactions to corporate scandals, scientific and media pronouncements about climate change, Government initiatives, responses from financial markets and the influence of (...)
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  45. Alan Lewis & Craig Mackenzie (2000). Support for Investor Activism Among U.K. Ethical Investors. Journal of Business Ethics 24 (3):215 - 222.
    An important goal of ethical investment is to influence companies to improve their ethical and environmental performance. The principal means that many ethical funds employ is passive market signalling, which may not, on its own, have a significant effect. A much more promising approach may be active engagement. This paper reports on a questionnaire study of a sample of 1146 ethical investors in order to assess whether U.K. ethical investors would support more activist ethical investment and whether they would be (...)
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  46. Céline Louche & Steven Lydenberg (2006). Socially Responsible Investment. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:112-117.
    The paper focuses on the development and practices of Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) in the US and Europe. The aim is to explore the historical, cultural and political embeddedness of SRI. Based on secondary sources of information, it offers a comparative analysis of the development and current practicesof SRI on both sides of the Atlantic and discusses the future implications for SRI. The paper shows that SRI movements in both regions present differences in terms of definitions, actors involved, vocabulary and (...)
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  47. Josep M. Lozano, Laura Albareda & M. Rosario Balaguer (2006). Socially Responsible Investment in the Spanish Financial Market. Journal of Business Ethics 69 (3):305 - 316.
    This paper reviews the development of socially responsible investment (SRI) in the Spanish financial market. The year, 1997 saw the appearance in Spain of the first SRI mutual fund, but it was not until late 1999, that major Spanish fund managers offered SRI mutual funds on the retail market. The development of SRI in the Spanish financial market has not experienced the high levels of development seen in other European countries, such as France or Italy, where interest in SRI began (...)
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  48. Craig Mackenzie (1998). The Choice of Criteria in Ethical Investment. Business Ethics 7 (2):81–86.
    How do ethical investment funds choose their ethical criteria? How intelligent is this process from an ethical point of view? This paper reports on his field work carried out as part of the Bath University ‘Morals and Money’ Project. After completing this research, Dr. Craig Mackenzie left academia to become ethics development officer at Friends Provident. He can be contacted at 15 Old Bailey, London, EC4M 7AP; c.mackenzie@stewardship.co.uk.
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  49. William Martin (2009). Socially Responsible Investing: Is Your Fiduciary Duty at Risk? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):549 - 560.
    Socially responsible investing identifies the fiduciary duty and liability for financial advisors serving individual and institutional clients when consulting in the SRI space. This article first discusses the role of a fiduciary emerging from both a legal and an ethical basis. Further, the special aspects of maintaining fiduciary duty and minimizing fiduciary liability are described as they relate to SRI. A number of recommendations are discussed: legal, ethical, and practice. This study argues that prudence focuses more on the process of (...)
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  50. Jonathan McLachlan & John Gardner (2004). A Comparison of Socially Responsible and Conventional Investors. Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):11-25.
    Socially responsible investment is a rapidly emerging phenomenon within the field of personal investment. However, the factors that lead investors to choose socially responsible investment products are not well understood, especially in an Australian context. This study provides a comparative examination of conventional and socially responsible investors, with the aim of identifying such factors. A total of 55 conventional investors and 54 ethical investors participated in the study by completing mailed questionnaires about their investment and general behaviour and their attitudes (...)
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