This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
9 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Mengistu Amberber (ed.) (2007). The Language of Memory in a Cross-Linguistic Perspective. John Benjamins.
    ... volume explores the language of memory in a cross-linguistic perspective. The term memory is to be understood broadly as the "capacity to encode, store, ...
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. P. Beade (1993). Book Reviews : Karol Janicki, Toward Non-Essentialist Sociolinguistics. Berlin and New York: Mouton de Gruyter, 1990. Pp. 136. D.M. 88.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (4):548-551.
  3. Sylvia Burrow (2008). Gendered Politeness, Self-Respect, and Autonomy. In Bernard Mulo Farenkia (ed.), In De la Politesse Linguistique au Cameroun / Linguistic Politeness in Cameroon. Peter Lang.
    Socialization enforces gendered standards of politeness that encourage men to be dominating and women to be deferential in mixed-gender discourse. This gendered dynamic of politeness places women in a double bind. If women are to participate in polite discourse with men, and thus to avail of smooth and fortuitous social interaction, women demote themselves to a lower social ranking. If women wish to rise above such ranking, then they fail to be polite and hence, open themselves to a wellspring of (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Brian D. Earp (2012). The Extinction of Masculine Generics. Journal for Communication and Culture 2 (1):4-19.
    In English, as in many other languages, male-gendered pronouns are sometimes used to refer not only to men, but to individuals whose gender is unknown or unspecified, to human beings in general (as in ―mankind‖) and sometimes even to females (as when the casual ―Hey guys‖ is spoken to a group of women). These so-called he/man or masculine generics have come under fire in recent decades for being sexist, even archaic, and positively harmful to women and girls; and advocates of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Riccardo Fusaroli & Kristian Tylen (2012). Carving Language for Social Coordination: A Dynamical Approach. Interaction Studies 13 (1):103-124.
    Human social coordination is often mediated by language. Through verbal dialogue, people direct each other's attention to properties of their shared environment, they discuss how to jointly solve problems, share their introspections, and distribute roles and assignments. In this article, we propose a dynamical framework for the study of the coordinative role of language. Based on a review of a number of recent experimental studies, we argue that shared symbolic patterns emerge and stabilize through a process of local reciprocal linguistic (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ruqaiya Hasan (2009). Semantic Variation: Meaning in Society and in Sociolinguistics. Equinox.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Karol Janicki (2006). Language Misconceived: Arguing for Applied Cognitive Sociolinguistics. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
    Linguistics is important. An understanding of linguistic principles is as essential to the layperson as it is to the language scholar. Using concrete examples from politics, law, and education, this book shows how people misconceive language every day and what the consequences of misconceptions can be. Since the meanings of words are often fuzzy at best, this volume argues for a flexible approach to meaning and definitions, and demonstrates how this approach can help us understand many conflicts. It is an (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Dunja Jutronić (2010). Kako Bi Trebali Govoriti Hrvatski Magarci? O Sociolingvistici Animiranih Filmova (How Should Croatian Donkeys Speak? Sociolinguistics of Animated Films). Croatian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):287-292.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Trevor Pateman (1985). From Nativism to Sociolinguistics: Integrating a Theory of Language Growth with a Theory of Speech Practices. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 15 (1):38–58.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation