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  1. Andrew Aberdein (2008). The Companions and Socrates: Is Inara a Hetaera? In Rhonda V. Wilcox & Tanya Cochran (eds.), Investigating Firefly and Serenity: Science Fiction on the Frontier. I. B. Tauris. 63-75.
  2. Christa Davis Acampora (2002). Nietzsche Contra Homer, Socrates, and Paul. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 24 (1):25-53.
  3. Adela Marion Adam (1918). Socrates, 'Qvantvm Mvtatvs Ab Illo'. Classical Quarterly 12 (3-4):121-.
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  4. J. Adam (1890). On Some Passages in Plato's Republic. The Classical Review 4 (08):356-357.
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  5. Don Adams (2009). Socrates' Commitment to the Truth. Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):267-287.
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  6. Ruhi Muhsen Afnán (1969). Zoroaster's Influence on Anaxagoras, the Greek Tragedians, and Socrates. New York, Philosophical Library.
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  7. Sara Ahbel-Rappe & Rachana Kamtekar (eds.) (2006/2009). A Companion to Socrates. Blackwell Pub..
    Written by an outstanding international team of scholars, this Companion explores the profound influence of Socrates on the history of Western philosophy. A survey exploring the profound influence of Socrates on the history of Western philosophy. Discusses the life of Socrates and key philosophical doctrines associated with him. Covers the whole range of Socratic studies from the ancient world to contemporary European philosophy. Examines Socrates’ place in the larger philosophical traditions of the Hellenistic world, the Roman Empire, the Arabic world, (...)
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  8. D. J. Allan (1966). The Method of Aristotelian Physics Wolfgang Wieland: Die Aristotelische Physik. Pp. 354. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, Cloth, DM. 42. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 16 (02):168-171.
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  9. D. J. Allan (1936). Helmut Kuhn : Sokrates: ein Versuch über den Ursprung der Metaphysik. Pp. 161. Berlin : 'Die Runde,' 1934. Cloth. The Classical Review 50 (05):199-.
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  10. James B. Allis (1989). Socrates and the Political Community: An Ancient Debate. Ancient Philosophy 9 (2):323-326.
  11. Arthur Lap An (1957). The Function of Socrates' Educational Method. Educational Theory 7 (2):135-159.
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  12. Abraham Anderson (1991). Some Views of Socrates. Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):351-359.
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  13. Daniel E. Anderson (1967). Socrates' Concept of Piety. Journal of the History of Philosophy 5 (1):1-13.
    This article, Based on a study of the "euthyphro," "apology" and "crito," suggests that for socrates (and therefore, Presumably, The young plato) piety is service to the dialectic, And that for socrates the dialectic itself takes over the position reserved in the popular religion for the gods (thus making socrates guilty, At least metaphorically, Of the charge of believing in "other new divine powers"). Part one seeks to establish that the dialectic controls the pious man's beliefs; part two, That it (...)
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  14. J. K. Anderson (1969). Anna S. Benjamin: Xenophon: Recollections of Socrates and Socrates' Defense Before the Jury. Pp. Xxv+157. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill Co., Inc., 1965. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 19 (1):102-103.
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  15. John Anderson (1931). Socrates as an Educator. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):172 – 184.
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  16. Mark Anderson (2005). Socrates as Hoplite. Ancient Philosophy 25 (2):273-289.
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  17. Tom Angier (2010). Aristotle's Dialogue with Socrates: On the Nicomachean Ethics – Ronna Burger. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (240):639-641.
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  18. Julia Annas (1988). The Heirs of Socrates. [REVIEW] Phronesis 33 (1):100-112.
  19. Apuleius (1993). The God of Socrates. Heptangle Books.
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  20. Andre M. Archie (2010). Socrates on Friendship and Community. Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):446-451.
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  21. Andre M. Archie (2010). The Anatomy of a Dialogue. Journal of Philosophical Research 35:129-146.
    This paper shows Socratic elenchus as an efficient and effective way of modeling rational knowledge seeking. Like ordinary conversations, the elenctic exchanges in the dialogues presuppose a degree of autonomy on the part of its participants. Socrates’ line of questioning often seems pertinent to a particular interlocutor because he is well aware of the fact that the interlocutor has goals and ambitions or is reputed to be an expert at something. In turn, Socrates’ line ofquestioning reflects his own goals and (...)
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  22. André Maurice Archie (2003). The Framing of Socrates. Ancient Philosophy 23 (2):424-428.
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  23. Zoran Arsović (ed.) (2011). U Sokratu Krije Sokrates: (Zbornik). Uh.
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  24. Gary Michael Atkinson (2010). Socrates in the Underworld. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):825-829.
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  25. Emily A. Austin (2010). Prudence and the Fear of Death in Plato's Apology. Ancient Philosophy 30 (1):39-55.
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  26. Randall E. Auxier (2008). Anne Marie Bowery's “Examining the Role and Function of Socrates' Narrative Audience in Plato's Euthydemus”. Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (2):25-28.
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  27. Julian Baggini & Stuart Hampshire (2000). Seeing Both Sides. The Philosophers' Magazine 9 (9):42-45.
    “Socrates spent many of his prime years fighting the most vicious, pitiless wars. I think that has a huge impact. I wonder if his central interest in the good is because actually he saw a lot that was very bad all around him.”.
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  28. Geoffrey Bagwell (2014). The Circle of Socrates: Readings in First-Generation Socratics [Review]. [REVIEW] Teaching Philosophy 37 (2):253-257.
  29. Tongdong Bai (2010). What to Do in an Unjust State?: On Confucius's and Socrates's Views on Political Duty. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):375-390.
    Confucius argued for the centrality of the superior man’s political duty to his fellow human beings and to the state, while Socrates suggested that the superior man (the philosopher) may have no such political duty. However, Confucius also suggested that one not enter or stay—let alone save—a troubled state, while Socrates stayed in an unjust state, apparently fulfilling his political duty to the state by accepting an unjust verdict. In this essay, I will try to show how Confucius could solve (...)
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  30. Annette C. Baier (2012). Hume's Damage Control. The Philosophers' Magazine 56 (56):87-89.
    We want to know about philosophers’ lives in part to see how they applied their philosophy to their own lives. Plato’s account of Socrates’ life, trial, and death sets a great example here, perhaps never equalled, just as few philosophers equal Socrates in integrity and courage.
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  31. Jacques A. Bailly (2004). The Trials of Socrates. Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):206-210.
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  32. Jacques A. Bailly (2004). The Trials of Socrates: Six Classic Texts, Edited by C.D.C. Reeve. Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):206-210.
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  33. Shaun Baker (2006). BRICKHOUSE, T.C. And SMITH, N.D. -Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Plato and the Trial of Socrates. Philosophical Books 47 (2):157-160.
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  34. Charles M. Bakewell (1909). The Unique Case of Socrates. International Journal of Ethics 20 (1):10-28.
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  35. Oded Balaban (2011). The Moral Intellectualism of Plato's Socrates The Case of the Hippias Minor. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):1-14.
    Commentators do not take Socrates' theses in the Hippias Minor seriously. They believe it is an aporetic dialogue and even that Socrates does not mean what he says. Hence they are unable to understand the presuppositions behind Socrates' two interconnected theses: that those who do wrong and lie voluntarily are better than those who do wrong unintentionally, and that no one does wrong and lies voluntarily. Arguing that liars are better than the unenlightened, Socrates concludes that there are no liars. (...)
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  36. H. C. Baldry (1960). André Bonnard: Greek Civilization. From the Antigone to Socrates. Translated by A. L. Sells. Pp. 248; 32 Plates. London: Allen & Unwin, 1959. Cloth, 30s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 10 (03):264-.
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  37. Edward G. Ballard (1961). Socrates' Problem. Ethics 71 (4):296-300.
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  38. Dirk Baltzly (1996). Socratic Anti-Empiricism in the "Phaedo&Quot;. Apeiron 29 (4):121 - 142.
    In the Phaedo, Socrates endorses the view that the senses are not a means whereby we may come to gain knowledge. Whenever one investigates by means of the senses, one is deceived. One can attain truth only by inquiry through intellect alone. It is a measure of the success of empiricism that modern commentators take a very different approach to Phaedo 65a9-67b3 than their neoplatonist forebearers did. In what follows I shall argue that, if they made too much of "Socrate's" (...)
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  39. Dirk Baltzly & Nick Eliopoulos (2009). The Classical Ideals of Friendship. In Barabara Caine (ed.), Friendship: a history,. Equinox.
    Surveys the ideals of friendship in ancient Greco-Roman philosophy. The notion of the best friendship inevitably reflects the various conceptions of a good life.
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  40. Marina Barabas (1986). The Strangeness of Socrates. Philosophical Investigations 9 (2):89-110.
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  41. Andrew Barker (1977). Why Did Socrates Refuse to Escape? Phronesis 22 (1):13 - 28.
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  42. Andrew Barker (1977). Why Did Socrates Refuse to Escape ? Phronesis 22 (1):13-28.
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  43. Rachel Barney (2006). Socrates' Refutation of Thrasymachus. In Gerasimos Xenophon Santas (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Plato's Republic. Blackwell Pub..
    Socrates’ refutations of Thrasymachus in Republic I are unsatisfactory on a number of levels which need to be carefully distinguished. At the same time several of his arguments are more powerful than they initially appear. Of particular interest are those which turn on the idea of a craft, which represents a shared norm of practical rationality here contested by Socrates and Thrasymachus.
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  44. Rachel Barney (1998). Socrates Agonistes: The Case of the Cratylus Etymologies. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 16:63-98.
    Are the long, wildly inventive etymologies in Plato’s Cratylus just some kind of joke, or does Plato himself accept them? This standard question misses the most important feature of the etymologies: they are a competitive performance, an agôn by Socrates in which he shows that he can play the game of etymologists like Cratylus better than they can themselves. Such show-off performances are a recurrent feature of Platonic dialogue: they include Socrates’ speeches on eros in the Phaedrus, his rhetorical discourse (...)
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  45. Robin Barrow (1986). Socrates Was a Human Being A Plea for Transcultural Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 15 (1):50-57.
    Abstract Socrates, as an Athenian living in the 5th century BC, belonged to a very different world from that of 20th century Britain. However, his moral example and thought do not therefore become foreign. This is not only because the West is, as a matter of fact, heir to the influence of Plato. It is also because morality, like science, knows no boundaries; although in both cases cultural factors will affect understanding, interpretation, implications etc., morality, like science, soccer or anything (...)
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  46. Clifford A. Bates (2010). The Death of Socrates and the Life of Philosophy. Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):171 - 174.
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  47. Joseph Beatty (1982). Socrates: Philosophy in Plato's Early Dialogues. Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (3):303-306.
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  48. Joseph Beatty (1976). Thinking and Moral Considerations: Socrates and Arendt's Eichmann. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 10 (4):266-278.
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  49. James Beckman (1979). The Religious Dimension of Socrates' Thought. Published for Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion by Wilfrid Laurier University Press.
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  50. William Behun (2010). Socrates' Graveyard. Semiotics:137-143.
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