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  1. Julia Annas (1988). Review: The Heirs of Socrates. [REVIEW] Phronesis 33 (1):100 - 112.
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  2. J. B. (1960). Aristotle. Review of Metaphysics 13 (4):704-704.
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  3. Geoffrey Bagwell (2014). The Circle of Socrates: Readings in First-Generation Socratics [Review]. [REVIEW] Teaching Philosophy 37 (2):253-257.
  4. Richard Bett (1999). The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 19 (2):404-407.
  5. E. K. Borthwick (2001). Socrates, Socratics, and the Word B E E Aim N. Classical Quarterly 51 (1):297-301.
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  6. E. K. Borthwick (2001). The Cynic and the Statue. Classical Quarterly 51 (2):494-498.
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  7. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus & Others.
    This 'paper' was intended to be the first chapter of a book (which never materialized). It sketches Aristippus'theory of ethics and some of the traditional arguments against it.
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  8. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus & Others.
    This 'paper' was intended as the first chapter of a book. It sketches Aristippus'theory of ethics, and discusses various objections to it (Plato, Aristotle, etc.).
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  9. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus.
    Aristippus’ theory is, surely, one of the first genuinely ‘philosophical’ theories of ethics. He advocates pursuing immediate pleasure and avoiding immediate pain. This doctrine evoked vigorous attacks from such notables as Plato and Aristotle. Here I consider some of those early arguments.
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  10. Hugh Chandler, Aristippus.
    This was an early chapter of what was later turned out to be a very different book. It sketches Aristippus’ theory of ethics and some of the arguments offered by others (e.g. Plato and Aristotle) in opposition to that theory.
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  11. J. L. Creed (1985). H. D. Rankin: Sophists, Socratics and Cynics. Pp. 263. London and Canberra: Croom Helm; Totowa, New Jersey: Barnes and Noble Books, 1983. £17.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 35 (01):198-199.
  12. Diogenes the Cynic (2012). Sayings and Anecdotes: With Other Popular Moralists. Oup Oxford.
    A unique edition of the sayings of Diogenes, whose biting wit and eccentricity inspired the anecdotes that express his Cynic philosophy. It includes the accounts of his immediate successors, such as Crates and Hipparchia, and the witty moral preacher Bion. The contrasting teachings of the Cyrenaics and the hedonistic Aristippos complete the volume.
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  13. R. M. Dancy (2003). The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 112 (3):409-413.
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  14. Klaus Döring (1988). Der Sokratesschüler Aristipp Und Die Kyrenaiker.
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  15. Gail Fine (2004). The Subjective Appearance of Cyrenaic Pathe. In V. Karasmanis (ed.), Socrates: 2400 Hundred Years Since His Death. European Cultural Center of Delphi.
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  16. Gail Fine (2003). Subjectivity, Ancient and Modern: The Cyrenaics, Sextus, and Descartes. In J. Miller & B. Inwood (eds.), Hellenistic and Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
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  17. Gail Fine (1992). Critical Review. Two Studies in the Ancient Academy. R.M. Dancy. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):393-410.
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  18. D. Glidden (1975). The Cyrenaics'. American Philosophical Quarterly Monograph Series 9:113-140.
  19. Margaret Graver (2002). Managing Mental Pain: Epicurus Vs. Aristippus on the Pre-Rehearsal of Future Ills. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):155-184.
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  20. Norman Gulley (1968). Socrates Jean Humbert: Socrate Et les Petits Socratiques. Pp. 293. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1967. Paper, 24 Fr. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 18 (03):290-292.
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  21. R. Hackforth (1935). Ecce Iterum Antisthenes H. Kesters: Antisthène de la Dialectique: étude critique et exégétique sur le XXVI' discours de Thémistius. Pp. 236. Louvain: Bibliothèque de l'Université, 1935. Paper, 50 francs. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 49 (06):223-224.
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  22. R. Hackforth (1934). J. Sykutris: Die Briefe des Sokrates und der Sokratiker. Pp. 125. (Studien z. Gesch. u. Kultur des Altertums. XVIII. Band. 2. Heft.) Paderborn: Schöningh, 1933. Paper, RM. 680. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 48 (04):147-.
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  23. R. J. Hankinson (2001). The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (3):720-723.
  24. T. H. Irwin (1991). Aristippus Against Happiness. The Monist 74 (1):55-82.
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  25. David Johnson (2009). Aristippus at the Crossroads: The Politics of Pleasure in Xenophon's Memorabilia. Polis 26 (2):204-222.
    In two passages from Xenophon's Memorabilia, Socrates refutes Aristippus, first by a rather brutal brand of Realpolitik , then by refusing to answer Aristippus' questions about the good and the beautiful . This article argues that the nasty politics that emerge in Memorabilia 2.1 are not Socratic, but rather the natural consequence of Aristippean hedonism. Political considerations of another sort drive Socrates' tactics in Memorabilia 3.8, where his evasive manoeuvres are driven by his desire to avoid a direct confrontation with (...)
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  26. David Lévystone (2005). La Figure d'Ulysse Chez les Socratiques: Socrate Polutropos. Phronesis 50 (2005):181 - 214.
    At the end of the fifth century B.C.E., the character of Odysseus was scorned by most of the Athenians: he illustrated the archetype of the demagogic, unscrupulous and ambitious politicians that had led Athens to its doom. Against this common doxa, the most important disciples of Socrates (Antisthenes, Plato, Xenophon) rehabilitate the hero and admire his temperance and his courage. But it is most surprising to see that, in spite of Odysseus' lies and deceit, these philosophers, who condemn steadfastly the (...)
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  27. David Lévystone (2005). La Figure d'Ulysse Chez les Socratiques : Socrate Polutropos. Phronesis 50 (3):181-214.
    At the end of the fifth century B.C.E., the character of Odysseus was scorned by most of the Athenians: he illustrated the archetype of the demagogic, unscrupulous and ambitious politicians that had led Athens to its doom. Against this common doxa, the most important disciples of Socrates (Antisthenes, Plato, Xenophon) rehabilitate the hero and admire his temperance and his courage. But it is most surprising to see that, in spite of Odysseus' lies and deceit, these philosophers, who condemn steadfastly the (...)
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  28. A. A. Long (2000). Cyrenaic Epistemology V. Tsouna: The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School . Pp. XIX + 180. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Cased, £30. Isbn: 0-521-62207-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):151-.
  29. A. A. Long (1992). Cyrenaics. In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), The Encyclopedia of Ethics. Garland Publishing Inc. 1--370.
  30. Wolfgang-Rainer Mann (1996). The Life of Aristippus. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 78 (2):97-119.
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  31. Luis E. Navia (2005). Diogenes the Cynic: The War Against the World. Humanity Books.
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  32. Tim O'Keefe (forthcoming). Hedonistic Theories of Well-Being in Antiquity. In Guy Fletcher (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Well-Being.
    Focuses on the theories of the Epicureans and Cyrenaics in light of Plato's and Aristotle's criticisms of hedonism. Closes with a brief discussion of how the Pyrrhonian skeptical conception of the telos compares to the Epicureans'.
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  33. Tim O'Keefe (2015). The Sources and Scope of Cyrenaic Scepticism. In Ugo Zilioli (ed.), From the Socratics to the Socratic Schools: Classical Ethics, Metaphysics and Epistemology. Routledge. 99-113.
    This paper focuses on two questions: (I) why do the Cyrenaics deny that we can gain knowledge concerning "external things," and (II) how wide-ranging is this denial? On the first question, I argue that the Cyrenaics are skeptical because of their contrast between the indubitable grasp we have of own affections, versus the inaccessibility of external things that cause these affections. Furthermore, this inaccessibility is due to our cognitive and perceptual limitations--it is an epistemological doctrine rooted in their psychology--and not (...)
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  34. Tim O'Keefe (2013). Cyrenaics. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  35. Tim O'Keefe (2013). Review of Ugo Zilioli, The Cyrenaics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:0-0.
    Argues that many of Zilioli's main contentions are mistaken--in particular, his contention that the Cyrenaics' skepticism is based upon an ambitious metaphysical thesis of indeterminacy.
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  36. Tim O'Keefe (2011). The Cyrenaics Vs. The Pyrrhonists on Knowledge of Appearances. In Diego E. Machuca (ed.), New Essays on Ancient Pyrrhonism. Brill. 27-40.
    In Outlines of Pyrrhonism, Sextus Empiricus takes pains to differentiate the skeptical way of life from other positions with which it is often confused, and in the course of this discussion he briefly explains how skepticism differs from Cyrenaicism. Surprisingly, Sextus does not mention an important apparent difference between the two. The Cyrenaics have a positive epistemic commitment--that we can apprehend our own feelings. Although we cannot know whether the honey is really sweet, we can know infallibly that right now (...)
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  37. Tim O'Keefe (2002). The Cyrenaics on Pleasure, Happiness, and Future-Concern. Phronesis 47 (4):395-416.
    The Cyrenaics assert that (1) particular pleasure is the highest good, and happiness is valued not for its own sake, but only for the sake of the particular pleasures that compose it; (2) we should not forego present pleasures for the sake of obtaining greater pleasure in the future. Their anti-eudaimonism and lack of future-concern do not follow from their hedonism. So why do they assert (1) and (2)? After reviewing and criticizing the proposals put forward by Annas, Irwin and (...)
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  38. Tim O'Keefe, Aristippus. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Brief article on this hedonist, follower of Socrates, and founder of the Cyrenaic school.
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  39. Tim O'Keefe, Cyrenaics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  40. Oliver Overwien (2005). Die Sprüche des Kynikers Diogenes in der Griechischen Und Arabischen Überlieferung. Steiner.
    Zum ersten Mal uberhaupt werden durch die vorliegende Untersuchung verschiedene zentrale Aspekte der literarischen Kleinform aSprucho in umfassender Weise behandelt.
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  41. Michael Pakaluk (1997). The Socratic Movement. Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):167-171.
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  42. A. C. Pearson (1913). Aeschines the Socratic Aischines von Sphettos: Studien Zur Literaturgeschichte der Sokratiker. Untersuchungen Und Fragmente von Heinrich Dittmar. [Vol. Xxi of Philologische Untersuchungen, Edited by Kiessling and Wilamowitz-Moellendorff.] Berlin: Weidmann, 1912. 8vo. Pp. Xii. 326. 10 M. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 27 (08):269-270.
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  43. Antonio Pele (ed.) (2010). La Dignidad Humana. Dykinson.
    “Todos los seres humanos nacen libres e iguales en dignidad y derechos y, dotados como están de razón y conciencia, deben comportarse fraternalmente los unos con los otros” (Artículo 1 de la Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos). “Consciente de su patrimonio espiritual y moral, la Unión está fundada sobre los valores indivisibles y universales de la dignidad humana, la libertad, la igualdad y la solidaridad, y se basa en los principios de la democracia y del Estado de Derecho” (Preámbulo de (...)
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  44. Julie Piering, Antisthenes. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  45. S. H. Prince (2005). Socrates and the Socratics G. Romeyer Dherbey, J.-B. Gourinat (Edd.): Socrate Et les Socratiques . Pp. Xi + 531. Paris: Librairie Philosophique J. Vrin, 2001. Paper, FFr 320. ISBN: 2-7116-1457-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):424-.
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  46. H. D. Rankin (1986). Anthisthenes Sokratikos. A.M. Hakkert.
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  47. David M. Schaps (2003). Socrates and the Socratics. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 96 (2).
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  48. John Sellars (2010). The Cynics: W. Desmond, Cynics. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (01):56-.
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  49. Željko Škuljević (2007). Mapa mediteranskog kirenaizma. Filozofska Istrazivanja 27 (3):551-557.
    Više začuđuje da je Aristip, koji se smatra rodonačelnikom kirenskog hedonizma, sokratovac, nego činjenica da je rodom iz mediteranske Kirene. Grad u kome je rođen, osnovali su nekoliko stoljeća prije grčki koloni, koji su došli s otoka Tere. Po Pindaru, njegova je porodica bila najbogatija i najuzvišenijeg roda u cijeloj Libiji, čime se objašnjava činjenica što je budući hedonist, od malena, bio naviknut na život u raskoši. Nikada ga nisu smatrali sokratovcem u pravom smislu te riječi , što će biti (...)
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  50. Michael G. Sollenberger (1994). Die Kyniker in der Modernen Forschung: Aufsätze Mit Einführung Und Bibliographie. Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):403-406.
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