This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
123 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 123
  1. Scott Aaronson, Evolution of Mutating Software.
    We propose using random walks in software space as abstract formal models of biological evolution. The goal is to shed light on biological creativity using toy models of evolution that are simple enough to prove theorems about them. We consider two models: a single mutating piece of software, and a population of mutating software. The fitness function is taken from a well known problem in computability theory that requires an unlimited amount of creativity, the Busy Beaver problem. (Talk given Friday (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Andoni Alonso & Carl Mitcham (2004). Software Libre 2004. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (1):65-67.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Olivier Bernard, Zakaria Hadj-Sadok & Denis Dochain (2000). Software Sensors to Monitor the Dynamics of Microbial Communities: Application to Anaerobic Digestion. Acta Biotheoretica 48 (3-4).
    A mass balance based model has been derived to represent the dynamical behavior of the ecosystem contained in an anaerobic digester. The model considers two bacterial populations: acidogenic and methanogenic bacteria. It forms the basis for the design of a software sensor considering both a model of the biological system and on-line gaseous measurements. The software sensor computes the concentration of inorganic carbon and volatile fatty acids (VFA) in the digester. Another software sensor is dedicated to the estimation of the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. David M. Berry (2012). The Social Epistemologies of Software. Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):379-398.
    This paper explores the specific questions raised for social epistemology encountered in code and software. It does so because these technologies increasingly make up an important part of our urban environment, and stretch across all aspects of our lives. The paper introduces and explores the way in which code and software become the conditions of possibility for human knowledge, crucially becoming computational epistemes, which we share with non-human but crucially knowledge-producing actors. As such, we need to take account of this (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David M. Berry (2011). The Philosophy of Software: Code and Mediation in the Digital Age. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Marco C. Bettoni (1995). Kant and the Software Crisis: Suggestions for the Construction of Human-Centred Software Systems. [REVIEW] AI and Society 9 (4):396-401.
    -/- In this article I deal with the question “How could we renew and enrich computer technology with Kant's help?”. By this I would like to invite computer scientists and engineers to initiate or intensify their cooperation with Kant experts. -/- What I am looking for is a better “method of definition” for software systems, particularly for the development of object-oriented and knowledge-based systems. -/- After a description of the “software crisis”, I deal first with the question why this crisis (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Kanika Tandon Bhal & Nivedita D. Leekha (2008). Exploring Cognitive Moral Logics Using Grounded Theory: The Case of Software Piracy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):635 - 646.
    The article reports findings of a study conducted to explore the cognitive moral logics used for considering software piracy as ethical or unethical. Since the objective was to elicit the moral logics from the respondents, semi-structured in-depth interviews of 38 software professionals of India were conducted. The content of the interviews was analyzed using the grounded theory framework which does not begin with constructs and their interlinkages and then seek proof instead it begins with an area of study and allows (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Viktor Binzberger (2009). Hermeneutic Practices in Software Development. Techne 13 (1):27-49.
    This paper shows the relevance of hermeneutic philosophy to understand how info­communication technologies frame our contemporary lifeworld. It demonstrates that the programming languages are the result of collective interpretations of the general lifeworld of programmers, management and political decision-makers. By having been inscribed into the processes of language use, this general interpretation permeates the particular practices of understanding that are possible within the language framework.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ned Block (1995). The Mind as the Software of the Brain. In Daniel N. Osherson, Lila Gleitman, Stephen M. Kosslyn, S. Smith & Saadya Sternberg (eds.), An Invitation to Cognitive Science. MIT Press. 170--185.
    In this section, we will start with an influential attempt to define `intelligence', and then we will move to a consideration of how human intelligence is to be investigated on the machine model. The last part of the section will discuss the relation between the mental and the biological.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Frances Brazier, Anja Oskamp, Corien Prins, Maurice Schellekens & Niek Wijngaards (2004). Anonymity and Software Agents: An Interdisciplinary Challenge. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 12 (1-2):137-157.
    Software agents that play a role in E-commerce and E-government applications involving the Internet often contain information about the identity of their human user such as credit cards and bank accounts. This paper discusses whether this is necessary: whether human users and software agents are allowed to be anonymous under the relevant legal regimes and whether an adequate interaction and balance between law and anonymity can be realised from both the perspective of Computer Systems and the perspective of Law.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Selmer Bringsjord, The Irrationality of the Free Software Movement.
    Approximately 48 hours ago, knowing that I would, Lord willing, be stand- ing here on this podium two days hence, I tapped http://www.fsf.org into Safari in order to begin learning at least something about the Free Software Movement (FSM). My online education has been augmented by many propo- nents of FSM in attendance at this conference, including Richard Stallman. What I have learned is that this movement is populated by a lot of seem- ingly well-intentioned people who are, at least (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Vincent J. Calluzzo & Charles J. Cante (2004). Ethics in Information Technology and Software Use. Journal of Business Ethics 51 (3):301-312.
    The emerging concern about software piracy and illegal or unauthorized use of information technology and software has been evident in the media and open literature for the last few years. In the course of conducting their academic assignments, the authors began to compare observations from classroom experiences related to ethics in the use of software and information technology and systems. Qualitatively and anecdotally, it appeared that many if not most, students had misconceptions about what represented ethical and unethical behaviors in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. D. M. Carter (2007). Libronix Digital Library System, Liddell (H.G.), Scott (R.) A Greek–English Lexicon (9th Edition, Oxford 1996, Revised H.S. Jones and R. McKenzie, Revised Supplement P.G.W. Glare). Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software, 2003. CD-ROM, US$145. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (01):228-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Robert J. Cavalier (1985). They Review Software, Don't They? Teaching Philosophy 8 (3):242-244.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Mei-Fang Chen, Ching-Ti Pan & Ming-Chuan Pan (2009). The Joint Moderating Impact of Moral Intensity and Moral Judgment on Consumer's Use Intention of Pirated Software. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):361 - 373.
    Moral issues have been included in the studies of consumer misbehavior research, but little is known about the joint moderating effect of moral intensity and moral judgment on the consumer’s use intention of pirated software. This study aims to understand the consumer’s use intention of pirated software in Taiwan based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) proposed by Ajzen (Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 50, 179, 1991). In addition, moral intensity and moral judgment are adopted as a joint (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Hung-Chang Chiu, Yi-Ching Hsieh & Mei-Chien Wang (2008). How to Encourage Customers to Use Legal Software. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (3):583 - 595.
    This study attempts to identify customer retention strategies for legal software and discusses their effectiveness for three consumer groups (stayers, dissatisfied switchers, and satisfied switchers). Although previous studies propose several antipirating strategies, they do not discuss how to enhance customer intentions to use legal software, which is crucial for software companies. The authors provide four generic retention strategies developed from both antipiracy and customer loyalty literature. The results indicate lower-pricing, legal, communication, and product strategies all enhance customer purchase intentions toward (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Chong Ju Choi, Sae Won Kim & Shui Yu (2009). Global Ethics of Collective Internet Governance: Intrinsic Motivation and Open Source Software. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):523 - 531.
    The ethical governance of the global Internet is an accelerating global phenomenon. A key paradox of the global Internet is that it allows individual and collective decision making to co-exist with each other. Open source software (OSS) communities are a globally accelerating phenomenon. OSS refers to groups of programs that allow the free use of the software and further the code sharing to the general and corporate users of the software. The combination of private provision and public knowledge and software, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. S. Chopra & S. Dexter (2011). Free Software and the Economics of Information Justice. Ethics and Information Technology 13 (3):173-184.
    Claims about the potential of free software to reform the production and distribution of software are routinely countered by skepticism that the free software community fails to engage the pragmatic and economic ‘realities’ of a software industry. We argue to the contrary that contemporary business and economic trends definitively demonstrate the financial viability of an economy based on free software. But the argument for free software derives its true normative weight from social justice considerations: the evaluation of the basis for (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Samir Chopra, A Comparative Ethical Assessment of Free Software Licensing Schemes.
    Software is much more than sequences of instructions for a computing machine: it can be an enabler (or disabler) of political imperatives and policies. Hence, it is subject to the same assessment in a normative dimension as other political and social phenomena. The core distinction between free software and its proprietary counterpart is that free software makes available to its user the knowledge and innovation contributed by the creator(s) of the software, in the form of the created source code. From (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Samir Chopra & Scott Dexter, Decoding Liberation: The Promise of Free and Open Source Software.
    Routledge (New Media and Cyberculture Series), July 2007.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Samir Chopra & Scott Dexter (2009). The Freedoms of Software and its Ethical Uses. Ethics and Information Technology 11 (4):287-297.
    The “free” in “free software” refers to a cluster of four specific freedoms identified by the Free Software Definition. The first freedom, termed “Freedom Zero,” intends to protect the right of the user to deploy software in whatever fashion, towards whatever end, he or she sees fit. But software may be used to achieve ethically questionable ends. This highlights a tension in the provision of software freedoms: while the definition explicitly forbids direct restrictions on users’ freedoms, it does not address (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. L. Jonathan Cohen (1987). A Note on the Evolutionary Theory of Software Development. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (3):381-384.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Timothy R. Colburn (1999). Software, Abstraction, and Ontology. The Monist 82 (1):3-19.
    This paper analyzes both philosophical and practical assumptions underlying claims for the dual nature of software, including software as a machine made of text, and software as a concrete abstraction. A related view of computer science as a branch of pure mathematics is analyzed through a comparative examination of the nature of abstraction in mathematics and computer science. The relationship between the concrete and the abstract in computer programs is then described by exploring a taxonomy of approaches borrowed from philosophy (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Timothy R. Colburn (1998). Information Modeling Aspects of Software Development. Minds and Machines 8 (3):375-393.
    The distinction between the modeling of information and the modeling of data in the creation of automated systems has historically been important because the development tools available to programmers have been wedded to machine oriented data types and processes. However, advances in software engineering, particularly the move toward data abstraction in software design, allow activities reasonably described as information modeling to be performed in the software creation process. An examination of the evolution of programming languages and development of general programming (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Timothy Paul Cronan & Sulaiman Al-Rafee (2008). Factors That Influence the Intention to Pirate Software and Media. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (4):527 - 545.
    This study focuses on one of the newer forms of software piracy, known as digital piracy, and uses the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a framework to attempt to determine factors that influence digital piracy (the illegal copying/downloading of copyrighted software and media files). This study examines factors, which could determine an individual’s intention to pirate digital material (software, media, etc.). Past piracy behavior and moral obligation, in addition to the prevailing theories of behavior (Theory of Planned Behavior), were (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Paul B. de Laat (2006). Internet-Based Commons of Intellectual Resources: An Exploration of Their Variety. In Jacques Berleur, Markku I. Nurminen & John Impagliazzo (eds.), IFIP; Social Informatics: An Information Society for All? In Remembrance of Rob Kling Vol 223. Springer.
    During the two last decades, speeded up by the development of the Internet, several types of commons have been opened up for intellectual resources. In this article their variety is being explored as to the kind of resources and the type of regulation involved. The open source software movement initiated the phenomenon, by creating a copyright-based commons of source code that can be labelled `dynamic': allowing both use and modification of resources. Additionally, such a commons may be either protected from (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Paul B. de Laat (2005). Copyright or Copyleft?: An Analysis of Property Regimes for Software Development. Research Policy 34 (10):1511-1532.
    Two property regimes for software development may be distinguished. Within corporations, on the one hand, a Private Regime obtains which excludes all outsiders from access to a firm's software assets. It is shown how the protective instruments of secrecy and both copyright and patent have been strengthened considerably during the last two decades. On the other, a Public Regime among hackers may be distinguished, initiated by individuals, organizations or firms, in which source code is freely exchanged. It is argued that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Paul B. de Laat (2001). Open Source Software: A New Mertonian Ethos? In Anton Vedder (ed.), Ethics and the Internet. Intersentia.
    Hacker communities of the 1970s and 1980s developed a quite characteristic work ethos. Its norms are explored and shown to be quite similar to those which Robert Merton suggested govern academic life: communism, universalism, disinterestedness, and organized scepticism. In the 1990s the Internet multiplied the scale of these communities, allowing them to create successful software programs like Linux and Apache. After renaming themselves the `open source software' movement, with an emphasis on software quality, they succeeded in gaining corporate interest. As (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jan De Winter (2010). Explanations in Software Engineering: The Pragmatic Point of View. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 20 (2):277-289.
    This article reveals that explanatory practice in software engineering is in accordance with pragmatic explanatory pluralism, which states that explanations should at least partially be evaluated by their practical use. More specifically, I offer a defense of the idea that several explanation-types are legitimate in software engineering, and that the appropriateness of an explanation-type depends on (a) the engineer’s interests, and (b) the format of the explanation-seeking question he asks, with this format depending on his interests. This idea is defended (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Daniel C. Dennett (1986). Julian Jaynes' Software Archaeology. Canadian Psychology 27:149-54.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. David M. Douglas (2011). A Bundle of Software Rights and Duties. Ethics and Information Technology 13 (3):185-197.
    Like the ownership of physical property, the issues computer software ownership raises can be understood as concerns over how various rights and duties over software are shared between owners and users. The powers of software owners are defined in software licenses, the legal agreements defining what users can and cannot do with a particular program. To help clarify how these licenses permit and restrict users’ actions, here I present a conceptual framework of software rights and duties that is inspired by (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. David M. Douglas (2011). The Social Disutility of Software Ownership. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):485-502.
    Software ownership allows the owner to restrict the distribution of software and to prevent others from reading the software’s source code and building upon it. However, free software is released to users under software licenses that give them the right to read the source code, modify it, reuse it, and distribute the software to others. Proponents of free software such as Richard M. Stallman and Eben Moglen argue that the social disutility of software ownership is a sufficient justification for prohibiting (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Catherine Eagleton & Matthew Spencer (2006). Copying and Conflation in Geoffrey Chaucer's Treatise on the Astrolabe: A Stemmatic Analysis Using Phylogenetic Software. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (2):237-268.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Richard Ennals (2004). Ulf Hashagen, Reinhard Keil-Slawik and Arthur L. Norberg (Eds): History of Computing: Software Issues. [REVIEW] AI and Society 18 (1):82-83.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Behrouz Homayoun Far & Romi Satria Wahono (2003). Cognitive-Decision-Making Issues for Software Agents. Brain and Mind 4 (2):239-252.
    Rational decision making depends on what one believes, what one desires, and what one knows. In conventional decision models, beliefs are represented by probabilities and desires are represented by utilities. Software agents are knowledgeable entities capable of managing their own set of beliefs and desires, and they can decide upon the next operation to execute autonomously. They are also interactive entities capable of filtering communications and managing dialogues. Knowledgeability includes representing knowledge about the external world, reasoning with it, and sharing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Gene Fendt (2003). Hippias Major, Version 1.0: Software for Post-Colonial, Multicultural Technology Systems. Journal of Philosophy of Education 37 (1):89–99.
  37. Stan Franklin, Conscious Software: A Computational View of Mind.
  38. Stan Franklin, Action Selection and Language Generation in "Conscious" Software Agents.
  39. Stan Franklin & Art Graesser (1999). A Software Agent Model of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (3):285-301.
    Baars (1988, 1997) has proposed a psychological theory of consciousness, called global workspace theory. The present study describes a software agent implementation of that theory, called ''Conscious'' Mattie (CMattie). CMattie operates in a clerical domain from within a UNIX operating system, sending messages and interpreting messages in natural language that organize seminars at a university. CMattie fleshes out global workspace theory with a detailed computational model that integrates contemporary architectures in cognitive science and artificial intelligence. Baars (1997) lists the psychological (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Nir Fresco & Marty J. Wolf (2014). The Instructional Information Processing Account of Digital Computation. Synthese 191 (7):1469-1492.
    What is nontrivial digital computation? It is the processing of discrete data through discrete state transitions in accordance with finite instructional information. The motivation for our account is that many previous attempts to answer this question are inadequate, and also that this account accords with the common intuition that digital computation is a type of information processing. We use the notion of reachability in a graph to defend this characterization in memory-based systems and underscore the importance of instructional information for (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Tomohiro Fukuhara, Toshihiro Murayama & Toyoaki Nishida (2007). Analyzing Concerns of People From Weblog Articles. AI and Society 22 (2):253-263.
    A system for analyzing concerns of people from Weblog articles is proposed. The system called KANSHIN analyzes concerns of people by collecting Japanese, Chinese, and Korean Weblog articles. Users can find concerns of people in each language. Users can also compare differences of concerns between Japanese, Chinese, and Korean language communities. We describe several analysis results: (1) patterns of social concerns, (2) change of focuses on a problem along with the time, (3) differences of concerns on a problem between Japanese, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Gonzalo Génova, M. Rosario González & Anabel Fraga (2007). Ethical Education in Software Engineering: Responsibility in the Production of Complex Systems. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):505-522.
    Among the various contemporary schools of moral thinking, consequence-based ethics, as opposed to rule-based, seems to have a good acceptance among professionals such as software engineers. But naïve consequentialism is intellectually too weak to serve as a practical guide in the profession. Besides, the complexity of software systems makes it very hard to know in advance the consequences that will derive from professional activities in the production of software. Therefore, following the spirit of well-known codes of ethics such as the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Richard S. Glass & Wallace A. Wood (1996). Situational Determinants of Software Piracy: An Equity Theory Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (11):1189 - 1198.
    Software piracy has become recognized as a major problem for the software industry and for business. One research approach that has provided a theoretical framework for studying software piracy has been to place the illegal copying of software within the domain of ethical decision making assumes that a person must be able to recognize software piracy as a moral issue. A person who fails to recognize a moral issue will fail to employ moral decision making schemata. There is substantial evidence (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Sigi Goode & Sam Cruise (2006). What Motivates Software Crackers? Journal of Business Ethics 65 (2):173 - 201.
    Software piracy is a serious problem in the software industry. Software authors and publishing companies lose revenue when pirated software rather than legally purchased software is used. Policy developers are forced to invest time and money into restricting software piracy. Much of the published research literature focuses on software piracy by end-users. However, end-users are only able to copy software once the copy protection has been removed by a ‘cracker’. This research aims to explore why, if copy protection is so (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Don Gotterbarn (1999). Not All Codes Are Created Equal: The Software Engineering Code of Ethics, a Success Story. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 22 (1):81 - 89.
    There has been a transition in the way software developers work. Mistakes in software have been treated as "normal" occurrences. "All software has bugs." However, software engineering is an emerging profession which as a profession has now said that a caviler approach to software errors is unacceptable. They have asserted a very strong ethical position in the Software Engineering Code of Ethics and Professional Practice, a position which mandates concern for all those affected by their work. The Code has several (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Don Gotterbarn (1998). The Uniqueness of Software Errors and Their Impact on Global Policy. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (3):351-356.
    The types of errors that emerge in the development and maintenance of software are essentially different from the types of errors that emerge in the development and maintenance of engineered hardware products. There is a set of standard responses to actual and potential hardware errors, including: engineering ethics codes, engineering practices, corporate policies and laws. The essential characteristics of software errors require new ethical, policy, and legal approaches to the development of software in the global arena.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Stefan Gruner (2011). Problems for a Philosophy of Software Engineering. Minds and Machines 21 (2):275-299.
    On the basis of an earlier contribution to the philosophy of computer science by Amnon Eden, this essay discusses to what extent Eden’s ‘paradigms’ of computer science can be transferred or applied to software engineering. This discussion implies an analysis of how software engineering and computer science are related to each other. The essay concludes that software engineering can neither be fully subsumed by computer science, nor vice versa. Consequently, also the philosophies of computer science and software engineering—though related to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Stefan Gruner (2010). Software Engineering Between Technics and Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 41 (1):237-260.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Pola B. Gupta, Stephen J. Gould & Bharath Pola (2004). “To Pirate or Not to Pirate”: A Comparative Study of the Ethical Versus Other Influences on the Consumer's Software Acquisition-Mode Decision. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (3):255 - 274.
    Consumers of software often face an acquisition-mode decision, namely whether to purchase or pirate that software. In terms of consumer welfare, consumers who pirate software may stand in opposition to those who purchase it. Marketers also face a decision whether to attempt to thwart that piracy or to ignore, if not encourage it as an aid to their softwares diffusion, and policymakers face the decision whether to adopt interventionist policies, which are government-centric, or laissez faire policies, which are marketer-centric. Here (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Maralee Harrell, Using Argument Diagramming Software to Teach Critical Thinking Skills.
    There is substantial evidence from many domains that visual representations aid various forms of cognition. We aimed to determine whether visual representations of argument structure enhanced the acquisition and development of critical thinking skills within the context of an introductory philosophy course. We found a significant effect of the use of argument diagrams, and this effect was stable even when multiple plausible correlates were controlled for. These results suggest that natural and relatively minor modifications to standard critical thinking courses could (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 123