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  1. Stephen C. Angle (2012). A Response to Thorian Harris. Philosophy East and West 62 (3):397-400.
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  2. James Behuniak Jr (2009). Li in East Asian Buddhism: One Approach From Plato's Parmenides. Asian Philosophy 19 (1):31 – 49.
    In Plato's Parmenides , Socrates proposes a 'Day' analogy to express one possible model of part/whole relations. His analogy is swiftly rejected and replaced with another analogy, that of the 'Sail'. In this paper, it is argued that there is a profound difference between these two analogies and that the 'Day' represents a distinct way to think about part/whole relations. This way of thinking, I argue, is the standard way of thinking in East Asian Buddhism. Plato's 'Day' analogy can then (...)
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  3. John Berthong (2003). Li Yong (1627-1705) and Epistemological Dimensions of Confucian Philosophy. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):164-165.
  4. John H. Berthrong (1998). Transformations of the Confucian Way. Westview Press.
    From its beginnings, Confucianism has vibrantly taught that each person is able to find the Way individually in service to the community and the world. For over 2,600 years, Confucianism has sustained a continual process of transformation and growth. In this comprehensive new work, John Berthrong examines the vitality and expansion of the Confucian tradition throughout East Asia and into the entire modern world.Confucianism has been credited with being the dominant social and intellectual force shaping the enduring civilizations of East (...)
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  5. Peter Kees Bol (2008). Neo-Confucianism in History. Distributed by Harvard University Press.
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  6. Anne Meller Ch'ien (1979). Hu Chü-Jen's Self-Cultivation as Ritual and Reverence in Everyday Life. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 6 (2):183-210.
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  7. Edward T. Ch'ien (1988). The Neo-Confucian Confrontation with Buddhism: A Structural and Historical Analysis. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (4):347-370.
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  8. Edward T. Ch'ien (1982). The Neo-Confucian Confrontation with Buddhism: A Structural and Historical Analysis. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (3):307-328.
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  9. Wing-Tsit Chan (1957). Neo-Confucianism and Chinese Scientific Thought. Philosophy East and West 6 (4):309-332.
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  10. Chün-mai Chang (1977). The Development of Neo-Confucian Thought. Greenwood Press.
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  11. Lai Chen (2006). On the Universal and Local Aspects of Confucianism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):79-91.
    To counter the tendency of making Confucianism "localized" and thereby turning Confucianism research into research of local social history, the author criticizes this tendency and thinks it is unilateral to emphasize or stress the importance of a small unit's locality, but ignore the oneness of the distribution of Confucianism and the universality of Confucian thought. The thesis emphasizes that the main schools of Confucianism in the Song and Ming Dynasties are all not local ones and cannot be reduced to reflections (...)
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  12. Shaoming Chen (2010). On Pleasure: A Reflection on Happiness From the Confucian and Daoist Perspectives. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):179-195.
    This paper discusses the structural relationship between ideals on pleasure and pleasure as a human psychological phenomenon in Chinese thought. It describes the psychological phenomenon of pleasure, and compares different approaches by pre-Qin Confucian and Daoist scholars. It also analyzes its development in Song and Ming Confucianism. Finally, in the conclusion, the issue is transferred to a general understanding of happiness, so as to demonstrate the modern value of the classical ideological experience.
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  13. Chung-yi Cheng (2008). Philosophical Development in Late Ming and Early Qing. In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
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  14. Chung-Ying Cheng (2012). World Humanities and Self-Reflection of Humanity: A Confucian-Neo-Confucian Perspective. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):476-494.
    This article presents and develops Zhu Xi's Neo-Confucian theory of heart-mind-will and human nature as the source and basis for the understanding of humanity. This article next shows how Kant and Confucius could be said to share the same vision of humanity in light of one particular historical connection between them. Finally, I have explored four forms of knowledge in light of a distinction between feeling and observation as well as their basic unity. This gives rise to our vision of (...)
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  15. Chung-Ying Cheng (2009). Li and Qi in the Yijing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (s1):73-100.
  16. Chung-ying Cheng (1997). On a Comprehensive Theory of Xing (Naturality) in Song-Ming Neo-Confucian Philosophy: A Critical and Integrative Development. Philosophy East and West 47 (1):33-46.
    The question of xing has received much attention in the revival of Neo-Confucian philosophy (called Contemporary Neo-Confucianism) in present-day Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China and among scholars of Chinese philosophy in the United States. It also has much to do with a critical consciousness of both the difference and the affinity between the Chinese philosophy of man and morality and the contemporary Western philosophy of human existence and moral virtues. The study of this has great meaning for the development of (...)
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  17. Chung-Ying Cheng (1979). Categories of Creativity in Whitehead and Neo-Confucianism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 6 (3):251-274.
  18. Chung-Ying Cheng (1973). Religious Reality and Religious Understanding in Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism. International Philosophical Quarterly 13 (1):33-61.
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  19. Suk Choi (2012). Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy. By Stephen C. Angle . (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. Xvi, 293 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978-0-19-538514-4; Paperback, ISBN 978-0199922239.). [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):616-620.
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  20. Tang Chun-I. (1971). The Spirit and Development of Neo-Confucianism. Inquiry 14 (1-4):56 – 83.
    The ideal of human life as a life of sagehood is the core of Confucian thought. In neo?Confucianism the stress is on the self?perfectibility of man, and the central concern of neo?Confucianist thinkers has accordingly been with the question of how man can cultivate his own potentiality to be a sage. The different answers they give are in the form of teachings about the ?way?, these teachings incorporating different philosophical views of mind, human nature, and the universe. The author outlines (...)
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  21. Edward T. Chʻien (1986). Chiao Hung and the Restructuring of Neo-Confucianism in the Late Ming. Columbia University Press.
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  22. J. C. Cleary (ed.) (1991). Worldly Wisdom: Confucian Teachings of the Ming Dynasty. Distributed in the U.S. By Random House.
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  23. Erin M. Cline (2010). Angle, Stephen C. Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo‐Confucian Philosophy . New York: Oxford University Press, 2009 . Pp. 293. $74.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 120 (4):826-831.
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  24. William Theodore De Bary (1981). Neo-Confucian Orthodoxy and the Learning of the Mind-and-Heart. Columbia University Press.
  25. William Theodore De Bary (ed.) (1975). The Unfolding of Neo-Confucianism. New York,Columbia University Press.
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  26. William Theodore De Bary & Irene Bloom (eds.) (1979). Principle and Practicality: Essays in Neo-Confucianism and Practical Learning. Columbia University Press.
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  27. Weixiang Ding (2010). Taking on Proper Appearance and Putting It Into Practice: Two Different Systems of Effort in Song and Ming Neo-Confucianism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (3):326-351.
    Both jianxing 践形 (taking on proper appearance) and jianxing 践行 (putting into practice) were concepts coined by Confucians before the Qin Dynasty. They largely referred to similar things. But because the Daxue 大学 ( Great Learning ) was listed as one of the Sishu 四书 (The Four Books) during the Song Dynasty, different explanations and trends in terms of the Great Learning resulted in taking on proper appearance and putting into practice becoming two different systems of efforts. The former formed (...)
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  28. Charles Wei-hsun Fu (1973). Morality or Beyond: The Neo-Confucian Confrontation with Mahāyāna Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 23 (3):375-396.
    In his critical examination of the most interesting and significant case, As the title shows, Of ideological 'love and hate' in the whole history of chinese philosophy and religion, The author first points out the mahayana influences on the formation of neo-Confucian philosophy. He then shows the neo-Confucian vehement attacks upon mahayana buddhism, Based on the three confucian principles inseparable and complementary to one another. After a philosophical clarification of mahayana thought against the neo-Confucian attacks, He concludes that, Despite their (...)
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  29. Wallace Gray (1995). American and Neo-Confucian Potentials for World Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (4):441-464.
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  30. Wen Haiming (2008). Xiang, Shiling 向世陵, the Diversification and Four Systems in Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism 宋明理學的分系與四系 Changsha 長沙: Hunan Daxue Chubanshe, 2006, 475 Pages. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):111-113.
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  31. Thorian R. Harris (2012). A Reply to Stephen Angle. Philosophy East and West 62 (3):400-402.
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  32. Thorian R. Harris (2012). Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy (Review). Philosophy East and West 62 (3):392-397.
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  33. Russell Hatton (1988). Is ch'I Recycled? The Debate Within the Neo-Confucian Tradition and its Implications with Respect to the Principle of Personal Identity. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (3):289-318.
  34. Kathleen Higgins (1980). Music in Confucian and Neo-Confucian Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 20 (4):433-451.
    This article proposes to discuss the role of music within confucian philosophy as a whole and within neo-Confucian philosophy in particular. The discussion includes a consideration of the construction of chinese music; philosophical correlations drawn between musical elements and features of both macrocosm and microcosm; musical aesthetics in the confucian and neo-Confucian philosophical systems; and affinities between the nature of music and the broader outlook of confucian and neo-Confucian philosophy. The suggestion is made that these affinities help to explain the (...)
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  35. Pao-Chien Hsü (1933). Ethical Realism in Neo-Confucian Thought. [New York, Columbia University Dissertation].
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  36. Siu-Chi Huang (1974). The Concept of T'ai-Chi (Supreme Ultimate) in Sung Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 1 (3-4):275-294.
  37. Yong Huang (2007). Neo-Confucian Political Philosophy: The Cheng Brothers on Li (Propriety) as Political, Psychological, and Metaphysical. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (2):217–238.
  38. Philip J. Ivanhoe (2010). Bol, Peter K., Neo-Confucianism in History. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):471-475.
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  39. Philip J. Ivanhoe (1998). The Ways of Confucianism. International Philosophical Quarterly 38 (1):98-100.
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  40. Philip J. Ivanhoe (1995). On the Metaphysical Foundations of Neo-and New Confucianism: Reflections on Lauren Pfister's Essay on Religious Confucianism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (1):81-89.
  41. Paul Yun-Ming Jiang (1983). Some Reflections on Ch'en Pai-Sha's Experience of Enlightenment. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 10 (3):229-250.
  42. Youngmin Kim (2006). Moral Agency and the Unity of the World: The Neo-Confucian Critique of "Vulgar Learning". Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (4):479-489.
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  43. Chen Lai (1999). The Concepts of Dao_ and _Li in Song—Ming Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Contemporary Chinese Thought 30 (4):9-24.
  44. Pauline C. Lee (2012). “There is Nothing More…Than Dressing and Eating”: Li Zhi 李贄 and the Child-Like Heart-Mind (Tongxin 童心). Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):63-81.
    Zhi 李贄, also named ( hao 號) Zhuowu 卓吾 (1527–1602), and argues that he articulates a coherent and compelling vision of a good life focused on the expression of genuine feelings distinctive to each individual. Through a study of literary texts and terms of art he refers to in his critical essay “On the Child-like Heart-mind” ( Tongxin Shuo 童心說), as well as the metaphors and images he fleshes out throughout his writings, I characterize Li’s ethical vision and show that (...)
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  45. Chenyang Li (2001). Understanding Confucian Philosophy: Classical and Sung-Ming (Review). Philosophy East and West 51 (2):312-314.
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  46. Jinglin Li (2006). The Ontologicalization of the Confucian Concept of Xin Xing: Zhou Lianxi's Founding Contribution to the Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (2):204-221.
    The Confucian concept of "cheng" (integrity) emphasizes logical priority of value realization over "zhen shi' (reality or truth). Through value realization and the completion of being, zhenshi can be achieved. Cheng demonstrates the original unity of value and reality. Taking the concept of cheng as the core, Zhou Lianxi's philosophy interpreted yi Dao (the Dao of change), and integrated Yi Jing (The Book of Changes) and Zhong Yong (The Doctrine of the Mean). On the one hand, it ontologicalized the Confucian (...)
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  47. Liu Liangjian (2011). Wu, Zhen 吳震: On Taizhou School 泰州學派研究. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):571-573.
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  48. James T. C. Liu (1973). How Did a Neo-Confucian School Become the State Orthodoxy? Philosophy East and West 23 (4):483-505.
    It was the lack of hope for political reform that turned a neo-Confucianist school led by chu hsi to develop comprehensive metaphysical principles and integrated social actions as the only true way to put the confucian value system into practice. An ill-Advised persecution led to the contrary result: a heightened prestige. Facing the mongol threat, The state in an effort to strengthen itself belatedly adopted this school as the state orthodoxy, More for prestige than for reality. When the mongols occupied (...)
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  49. Shu-Hsien Liu (2008). Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism (1) : From Cheng Yi to Zhu Xi. In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
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  50. Shu-hsien Liu (1998). Understanding Confucian Philosophy: Classical and Sung-Ming. Greenwood Press.
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