Related categories
Subcategories:
298 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 298
Material to categorize
  1. Danielle Allen (2004). ANTIPHON M. Gagarin: Antiphon the Athenian. Oratory, Law, and Justice in the Age of the Sophists . Pp. Xi + 222. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002. Cased, $40. ISBN: 0-292-72841-7. A. Hourcade: Antiphon d'Athènes. Une Pensée de l'Individu . Pp. 182. Paris: Editions OUSIA, 2001. Paper. ISBN: 2-87060-091-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (02):310-.
  2. Antiphon (2002). The Fragments. Cambridge Univ Pr.
    Complete edition, including a translation, of all the evidence for this philosophical contemporary of Socrates.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. C. F. B. (1973). The Older Sophists. A Complete Translation by Several Hands of the Fragments in "Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker" Edited by Diels-Kranz with a New Edition of Antiphon and of Euthydemus. Review of Metaphysics 26 (4):767-767.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Rachel Barney (2006). The Sophistic Movement. In M. L. Gill & P. Pellegrin (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Blackwell.
    This discussion emphasises the diversity, philosophical seriousness and methodological distinctiveness of sophistic thought. Particular attention is given to their views on language, ethics, and the social construction of various norms, as well as to their varied, often undogmatic dialectical methods. The assumption that the sophists must have shared common doctrines (not merely overlapping interests and professional practices) is called into question.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Richard Bemelmans (2002). Why Does Protagoras Rush Off? Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):75-86.
  6. Eugenio Benitez (1999). The Birth of Rhetoric: Gorgias, Plato and Their Successors Robert Wardy Issues in Ancient Philosophy New York: Routledge, 1996, Viii + 197 Pp., $76.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (04):901-.
  7. A. W. Benn (1909). The Cosmology of Prodicus. Mind 18 (71):411-413.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Richard Bett (2002). Is There a Sophistic Ethics? Ancient Philosophy 22 (2):235-262.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Richard Bett (1989). The Sophists and Relativism. Phronesis 34 (1):139-169.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. R. S. Bluck (1961). The Gorgias. The Classical Review 11 (01):28-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Mauro Bonazzi (2010). I Sofisti. Carocci.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. John E. Boodin (1911). From Protagoras to William James. The Monist 21 (1):73-91.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. G. W. Bowersock (1969). Greek Sophists in the Roman Empire. Oxford, Clarendon P..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Thomas H. Brobjer (2001). Nietzsche's Disinterest and Ambivalence Toward the Greek Sophists. International Studies in Philosophy 33 (3):5-23.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jerome V. Brown (1973). The Sophists. By W. K. C. Guthrie. Cambridge: The University Press. Pp. Ix, 345. $4.50. Dialogue 12 (03):530-531.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. M. F. Burnyeat (1978). Carl Joachim Classen: Sophistik. (Wege der Forschung, clxxxvii.) Pp. viii + 713. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1976. Cloth, DM. 121. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):359-360.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. M. F. Burnyeat (1976). Erratum: "Protagoras and Self-Refutation in Later Greek Philosophy". Philosophical Review 85 (3):436 -.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. M. F. Burnyeat (1976). Protagoras and Self-Refutation in Later Greek Philosophy. Philosophical Review 85 (1):44-69.
  19. P. S. Burrell (1932). Man the Measure of All Things: Socrates Versus Protagoras (I). Philosophy 7 (25):27 - 41.
  20. P. S. Burrell (1932). Man the Measure of All Things: Socrates Versus Protagoras (II). Philosophy 7 (26):168 - 184.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. V. C. C. (1957). Protagoras. Review of Metaphysics 10 (3):544-544.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Fernanda Decleva Caizzi (1986). « Hysteron proteron » : la nature et la loi selon Antiphon et Platon. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 91 (3):291 - 310.
    La découverte d'un nouveau fragment du papyrus contenant la Vérité d'Antiphon renforce l'hypothèse qu'il nous faut identifier le sophiste avec le rhétoricien de Rhamnonte dont Thucydide fait l'éloge. Si l'on analyse de ce point de vue l'ensemble des témoignages, il est possible de déceler, dans le Ménexène d'un côté, dans le livre X des Lois de l'autre, des pièces à l'appui de la thèse que les idées d'Antiphon étaient une des cibles visées par la polémique platonicienne. The discovery of a (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Luca Castagnoli (2004). Protagoras Refuted: How Clever is Socrates' "Most Clever" Argument at Theaetetus 171a–C?'. Topoi 23 (1):3-32.
    This article aims at reconstructing the logic and assessing the force of Socrates' argument against Protagoras' 'Measure Doctrine' (MD) at Theaetetus 171a–c. I examine and criticise some influential interpretations of the passage, according to which, e.g., Socrates is guilty of ignoratio elenchi by dropping the essential Protagorean qualifiers or successfully proves that md is self-refuting provided the missing qualifiers are restored by the attentive reader. Having clarified the meaning of MD, I analyse in detail the broader section 170a–171d and argue, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Venant Cauchy (1957). The Sophists. New Scholasticism 31 (1):136-137.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. T. D. J. Chappell (1995). Does Protagoras Refute Himself? Classical Quarterly 45 (02):333-.
    Protagoras believes that all beliefs are true. Since Protagoras' belief that all beliefs are true is itself a belief, it follows from Protagoras' belief that all beliefs are true that Protagoras' belief is true. But what about the belief that Protagoras' belief is false? Doesn't it follow, by parallel reasoning and not at all trivially, that if all beliefs are true and there is a belief that Protagoras' belief is false, then Protagoras' belief is false?
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. C. W. Chilton (1962). An Epicurean View of Protagoras: A Note on Diogenes of Oenoanda Fragment XII(W). Phronesis 7 (2):105 - 109.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. C. W. Chilton (1962). An Epicurean View of Protagoras: A Note on Diogenes of Oenoanda Fragment XII(W). Phronesis 7 (1):105-109.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Dee L. Clayman (2003). GORGIAS S. Consigny: Gorgias, Sophist and Artist . Pp. 242. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2001. Cased, $39.95. ISBN: 1-57003-424-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (02):293-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. William S. Cobb (1982). The Argument of the Protagoras. Dialogue 21 (04):713-731.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Levi Condinho, Maria José Vaz Pinto & Ana Alexandra Alves de Sousa (eds.) (2005). Sofistas: Testemunhos E Fragmentos. Imprensa Nacional-Casa da Moeda.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Thomas M. Conley (1985). Dating the so-Called Dissoi Logoi: A Cautionary Note. Ancient Philosophy 5 (1):59-65.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Michele Corradi (2012). Protagora: Tra Filologia E Filosofia: Le Testimonianze di Aristotele. F. Serra.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. J. L. Creed (1985). H. D. Rankin: Sophists, Socratics and Cynics. Pp. 263. London and Canberra: Croom Helm; Totowa, New Jersey: Barnes and Noble Books, 1983. £17.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 35 (01):198-199.
  34. I. M. Crombie (1976). Rudolph H. Weingartner: The Unity of the Platonic Dialogue: The Cratylus, the Protagoras, the Parmenides. Pp. X + 205. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1973. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 26 (1):132-133.
  35. Howard J. Curzer (1991). Two Varieties of Temperance in the Gorgias. International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (2):153-159.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. J. A. Davison (1953). Protagoras, Democritus, and Anaxagoras. Classical Quarterly 3 (1-2):33-.
    Recent accounts of the life of Protagoras differ widely from one another in their treatment of the ancient sources, and in the conclusions which they draw from them. A re-examination of the evidence, undertaken in 1949–50 as part of a study of the Prometheus trilogy, has convinced me that a new discussion is urgently needed if we are to place the earlier stages of the sophistic movement in the right context historically; and the purpose of this paper is to lay (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Theodore de Laguna (1920). The Lesser Hippias. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 17 (20):550-556.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jacqueline de Romilly (1992). The Great Sophists in Periclean Athens. Oxford University Press.
    The arrival of the Sophists in Athens in the middle of the fifth century B.C. was a major intellectual event, for they brought with them a new method of teaching founded on rhetoric and bold doctrines which broke away from tradition. In this book de Romilly investigates the reasons for the initial success of the Sophists and the reaction against them, in the context of the culture and civilization of classical Athens.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Hermann Diels & Rosamond Kent Sprague (eds.) (1972/2001). The Older Sophists: A Complete Translation by Several Hands of the Fragments in Die Fragmente Der Vorsokratiker, Edited by Diels-Kranz. With a New Edition of Antiphon and of Euthydemus. Hackett Pub..
    Name and notion -- Protagoras -- Xeniades -- Gorgias -- Lycophron -- Prodicus -- Thrasymachus -- Hippias -- Antiphon -- Critias -- Anonymus Iamblichi -- Dissoi Logoi or Dialexeis -- Appendix: Euthydemus of Chios.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. John Dillon (2005). Antiphon the Sophist. Ancient Philosophy 25 (2):440-443.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. John M. Dillon & Tania Gergel (eds.) (2003). The Greek Sophists. Penguin.
    The Sophists, who rose to prominence in democratic Athens during the mid-fifth century b.c., understood the art of rhetoric and the importance of being able to transform effective reasoning into persuasive public speaking. Their inquiries-into the gods, the origins of religion, and whether virtue can be taught-influenced the next generation of classical philosophers and formed the foundations of the European prose style and formal oratory. In this new translation each chapter is organized around the work of one character, including Gorgias, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Panos Dimas (2008). Good and Pleasure in the Protagoras. Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):253-284.
  43. Panos Dimas (2007). Teachers of Virtue. Ancient Philosophy 27 (1):1-23.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. E. R. Dodds (1954). The Nationality of Antiphon the Sophist. The Classical Review 4 (02):94-95.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. James Doyle (2010). Socrates and Gorgias. Phronesis 55 (1):1-25.
    In this paper I try to solve some problems concerning the interpretation of Socrates' conversation with Gorgias about the nature of rhetoric in Plato's Gorgias (448e6-461b2). I begin by clarifying what, ethically, is at stake in the conversation (section 2). In the main body of the paper (sections 3-6) I address the question of what we are to understand Gorgias as believing about the nature of rhetoric: I criticise accounts given by Charles Kahn and John Cooper, and suggest an alternative (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Shannon Dubose (1973). The Argument Laughs at Socrates and Protagoras. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 22:14-21.
  47. Slobodan Dušanić (1992). Alcidamas of Elaea in Plato's Phaedrus. Classical Quarterly 42 (02):347-.
    In Bk. 3 of the Institutio oratoria, Quintilian gives a list of the Greek artium scriptores of the classical epoch . It contains a controversial entry: ‘…et, quem Palameden Plato appellat, Alcidamas Elaites’ . The historicity of the rhetorician and sophist from Elaea named Alcidamas, Gorgias' pupil, is of course beyond doubt; scholars disagree only as to the ‘quem Palameden Plato appellat’.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Eva-Maria Engelen (2009). Anger, Shame and Justice: The Regulative Function of Emotions in the Ancient and Modern World. In Birgitt Röttger-Rössler & Hans Markowitsch (eds.), Emotions as Bio-cultural Processes. Springer. 395-413.
    Analyzing the ancient Greek point of view concerning anger, shame and justice and a very modern one, one can see, that anger has a regulative function, but shame does as well. Anger puts the other in his place, thereby regulating hierarchies. Shame regulates the social relations of recognition. And both emotions also have an evaluative function, because anger evaluates a situation with regard to a humiliation; shame, with regard to a misdemeanor. In addition, attention has to be paid to the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Michael Erler & Luc Brisson (eds.) (2007). Gorgias - Menon: Selected Papers From the Seventh Symposium Platonicum. Academia Verlag.
  50. Leonard J. Eslick (1956). The Sophists. Modern Schoolman 33 (2):131-133.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 298