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Sound

Edited by Casey O'Callaghan (Washington University in St. Louis)
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  1. S. Arkette (2004). Sounds Like City. Theory, Culture and Society 21 (1):159-168.
    Our cultural climate is increasingly dependent upon visual space. Media and communication for the most part are exemplified through television and the Internet. Aural space has, for the moment, become an ambient presence. The aim of this article is to develop a phenomenological approach to interpreting our sonic environment by drawing upon a range of sound-scape theorists. I will, in some cases, provide a counter-argument to established theses, and in doing so endeavour to open up fresh debate for future sonic (...)
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  2. D. E. Baier (1936). The Loudness of Complex Sounds. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (3):280.
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  3. A. Bass (1990). Vocalizing Fish: Sounds From the Intertidal Zone. BioScience 40:249-258.
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  4. Andrew H. Bass (1990). Sounds From the Intertidal Zone: Vocalizing Fish. BioScience 40 (4):249-258.
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  5. Mark J. Blechner (1977). Left-Ear Advantage for Sounds Characterized by a Rapidly Varying Resonance Frequency. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (5):363-366.
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  6. M. Bull (2004). Automobility and the Power of Sound. Theory, Culture and Society 21 (4-5):243-259.
    This article analyses the connections between forms of solitary automobile habitation and the use of mobile sound technologies in automobiles: the radio, cassette, sound system and mobile phone. It does this through an empirically informed analysis of automobile use. In doing so it re-evaluates our understanding of the occupation of space and place, arguing that traditional concepts of urban space have underestimated the active role that the users of these communication technologies might have in transforming the meaning of these spaces (...)
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  7. H. B. Carlson (1940). A Simple, Inexpensive, and Portable Apparatus for Demonstrating the 'Phantom' Sound. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (3):337.
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  8. R. Casati, E. Di Bona & J. Dokic (2013). The Ockhamization of the Event Sources of Sound. Analysis 73 (3):462-466.
    There is one character too many in the triad sound, event source, thing source. As there are neither phenomenological nor metaphysical grounds for distinguishing sounds and sound sources, we propose to identify them.
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  9. Roberto Casati, Sounds. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  10. Jonathan Cohen (2010). Sounds and Temporality. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 5:303-320.
    What is the relationship between sounds and time? More specifically, is there something essentially or distinctively temporal about sounds that distinguishes them from, say, colors, shapes, odors, tastes, or other sensible qualities? And just what might this distinctive relation to time consist in? Apart from their independent interest, these issues have a number of important philosophical repercussions. First, if sounds are temporal in a way that other sensible qualities are not, then this would mean that standard lists of paradigm secondary (...)
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  11. Sam C. Coval (1963). Persons and Sounds. Philosophical Quarterly 13 (January):26-32.
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  12. Silvia Dapiá & Guillermo Gregorio (1997). Throwing Sound Into Sounds. Semiotics:87-94.
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  13. Silvia Dapiá & Guillermo Gregorio (1997). Throwing Sound Into Sounds. Semiotics:87-94.
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  14. R. C. Davis (1948). Responses to 'Meaningful' and 'Meaningless' Sounds. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (6):744.
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  15. Brian K. Etter (1994). The Sounds of the Ideal. The Owl of Minerva 26 (1):47-58.
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  16. John Andrew Fisher (forthcoming). The Value of Natural Sounds. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
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  17. Gregory Fowler (2013). Against the Primary Sound Account of Echoes. Analysis 73 (3):466-473.
    I argue against the Primary Sound Account of Echoes (PSAE) – the view that an echo of a sound just is that sound. I then argue that if my case against PSAE is successful, distal theories of sound are false. The upshot of my arguments, if they succeed, is that distal theories are false. Towards the end, I show how some distal theories can be modified to avoid this conclusion and note some open questions to which the modified theories give (...)
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  18. A. Gritten (2012). Book Review: Sounds: A Philosophical Theory; Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (4):430-434.
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  19. Catherine Guastavino (forthcoming). Structure of Auditory Categories: The Case of Environmental Sounds. Cognition.
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  20. Susanne Herrmann-Sinai (2009). Sounds Without the Mind? Versuch einer Bestimmung des Klangbegriffs. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 57 (6):885-906.
    A fundamental concept of a philosophy of music is that of sound. Any investigation of this concept has to be ontologically as well as epistemically adequate. The main proposition of the article is that sounds can only be understood ontologically if we take into consideration their main characteristic of being strictly shapeless and lacking content, an insight that we can learn from Kant. In contradiction to Kant, sounds can be epistemologically characterized as objects that can only be re-presented if the (...)
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  21. N. Hudson-Rodd & S. G. Sterrett (1998). Sounds Like Light-The Early Years, 1879-1902. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 29 (1):1-35.
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  22. Don Ihde (2007). Listening and Voice. Phenomenologies of Sound. Suny Press.
    Listening and Voice is an updated and expanded edition of Don Ihde's groundbreaking 1976 classic in the study of sound.
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  23. Christine James (2005). Sonar Technology and Shifts in Environmental Ethics. Essays in Philosophy 6 (1).
    The history of sonar technology provides a fascinating case study for philosophers of science. During the first and second World Wars, sonar technology was primarily associated with activity on the part of the sonar technicians and researchers. Usually this activity is concerned with creation of sound waves under water, as in the classic “ping and echo”. The last fifteen years have seen a shift toward passive, ambient noise “acoustic daylight imaging” sonar. Along with this shift a new relationship has begun (...)
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  24. Olli-Taavetti Kankkunen (2010). Listening to Sounds in Sonic Praxis. In Inga Rikandi (ed.), Mapping the Common Ground: Philosophical Perspectives on Finnish Music Education. Btj. 114.
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  25. G. Kent Kedl (1980). Language: Sounds We Use to Communicate. Philosophical Investigations 3 (1):26-43.
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  26. P. Kerszberg (1999). The Sound of the Life-World. Continental Philosophy Review 32 (2):169-194.
    Husserl's investigations of internal time-consciousness take sound as the primary temporal object. However, in these investigations, the structure of the flux of temporal subjectivity is established to the detriment of the rich tonal content of sound. Just as Husserl has enlarged the significance of the spatial object of mathematical physics to include the historically-sedimented layers of its appearance, so the temporal object will receive additional intelligibility if the rich texture of musical sound is taken into consideration. Particularly useful for this (...)
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  27. J. Kulvicki (2008). Review: Casey O'Callaghan: Sounds: A Philosophical Theory. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (468):1112-1116.
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  28. John Kulvicki (2008). The Nature of Noise. Philosophers' Imprint 8 (11):1-16.
    There is a growing consensus in the philosophical literature that sounds differ rather profoundly from colors. Colors are qualities, while sounds are particulars of some sort or other, such as events or pressure waves. A key motivation for this is that sounds seem to be transient, to evolve over time, to begin and end, while colors seem like stable qualities of objects' surfaces. I argue that sounds are indeed, like colors, stable qualities of objects. Sounds are not transient, and they (...)
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  29. Barry Layton (1975). Differential Effects of Two Nonspeech Sounds on Phonemic Restoration. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (5):487-490.
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  30. Jason Leddington (2014). What We Hear. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Springer Studies in Brain and Mind.
    A longstanding philosophical tradition holds that the primary objects of hearing are sounds rather than sound sources. In this case, we hear sound sources by—or in virtue of—hearing their sounds. This paper argues that, on the contrary, we have good reason to believe that the primary objects of hearing are sound sources, and that the relationship between a sound and its source is much like the relationship between a color and its bearer. Just as we see objects in seeing their (...)
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  31. Alvin M. Liberman, Pierre C. Delattre, Louis J. Gerstman & Franklin S. Cooper (1956). Tempo of Frequency Change as a Cue for Distinguishing Classes of Speech Sounds. Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (2):127.
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  32. Alvin M. Liberman, Katherine Safford Harris, Howard S. Hoffman & Belver C. Griffith (1957). The Discrimination of Speech Sounds Within and Across Phoneme Boundaries. Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (5):358.
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  33. Don Locke (1961). Strawson's Auditory Universe. Philosophical Review 70 (October):518-532.
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  34. Fiona Macpherson (1999). Perfect Pitch and the Content of Experience. Philosophy and Anthropology 3 (2).
  35. Joseph Margolis (1960). Nothing Can Be Heard but Sound. Analysis 20 (4):82-87.
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  36. M. G. F. Martin (2012). Sounds and Images. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (4):331-351.
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  37. Mohan Matthen (2010). On the Diversity of Auditory Objects. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):63-89.
    This paper defends two theses about sensory objects. The more general thesis is that directly sensed objects are those delivered by sub-personal processes. It is shown how this thesis runs counter to perceptual atomism, the view that wholes are always sensed indirectly, through their parts. The more specific thesis is that while the direct objects of audition are all composed of sounds, these direct objects are not all sounds—here, a composite auditory object is a temporal sequence of sounds (whereas a (...)
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  38. Mark S. Muldoon (1996). Silence Revisited: Taking the Sight Out of Auditory Qualities. Review of Metaphysics 50 (2):275-298.
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  39. M. Nudds (forthcoming). Experiencing the Production of Sounds - Nudds - 2002 - European Journal of Philosophy - Wiley Online Library. European Journal of Philosophy.
    It is often supposed that our experience of sounds is as of things distinct from the material world of sight and touch: reflecting on the character of our auditory experience might seem to confirm that. This paper describes the features of our auditory experience that can lead ... \n.
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  40. Matthew Nudds (2010). What Sounds Are. In Dean Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics: Volume 5. Oup Oxford.
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  41. Matthew Nudds (2009). Sounds and Space. In Matthew Nudds & Casey O'Callaghan (eds.), Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays. Oup Oxford.
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  42. Matthew Nudds, Auditory Perception and Sounds.
    It is a commonly held view that auditory perception functions to tell us about sounds and their properties. In this paper I argue that this common view is mistaken and that auditory perception functions to tell us about the objects that are the sources of sounds. In doing so, I provide a general theory of auditory perception and use it to give an account of the content of auditory experience and of the nature of sounds.
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  43. Matthew Nudds (2001). Experiencing the Production of Sounds. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (2):210-229.
    Whether or not we would be happy to do without sounds, the idea that our expe- rience of sounds is of things which are distinct from the world of material objects can seem compelling. All you have to do to confirm it is close your eyes and reflect on the character of your auditory experience.
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  44. Matthew Nudds & Casey O'Callaghan (eds.) (2010). Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.
    The views are original, and there is substantive engagement among contributors. This collection will stimulate future research in this area.
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  45. Matthew Nudds & Casey O'Callaghan (eds.) (2010). Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.
    The views are original, and there is substantive engagement among contributors. This collection will stimulate future research in this area.
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  46. Casey O'Callaghan, Pitch.
    Some sounds have pitch, some do not. A tuba’s notes are lower pitched than a flute’s, but the fuzz from an untuned radio has no discernible pitch. Pitch is an attribute in virtue of which sounds that possess it can be ordered from “low” to “high”. Given how audition works, physics has taught us that frequency determines what pitch a sound auditorily appears to have.
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  47. Casey O'Callaghan (2014). Auditory Perception. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 2009.
  48. Casey O'Callaghan (2011). Hearing Properties, Effects or Parts? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (3pt3):375-405.
    Sounds are audible, and sound sources are audible. What is the audible relation between audible sounds and audible sources? Common talk and philosophy suggest three candidates. The first is that sounds audibly are properties instantiated by their sources. I argue that sounds are audible individuals and thus are not audibly instantiated by audible sources. The second is that sounds audibly are effects of their sources. I argue that auditory experience presents no compelling evidence that sounds audibly are causally related to (...)
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  49. Casey O'Callaghan (2011). Lessons From Beyond Vision (Sounds and Audition). Philosophical Studies 153 (1):143-160.
    Recent work on non-visual modalities aims to translate, extend, revise, or unify claims about perception beyond vision. This paper presents central lessons drawn from attention to hearing, sounds, and multimodality. It focuses on auditory awareness and its objects, and it advances more general lessons for perceptual theorizing that emerge from thinking about sounds and audition. The paper argues that sounds and audition no better support the privacy of perception’s objects than does vision; that perceptual objects are more diverse than an (...)
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  50. Casey O'Callaghan (2010). Perceiving the Locations of Sounds. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):123-140.
    Frequently, we learn of the locations of things and events in our environment by means of hearing. Hearing, I argue, is a locational mode of perceiving with a robustly spatial phenomenology. I defend three proposals. First, audition furnishes one with information about the locations of things and happenings in one’s environment because auditory experience itself has spatial content—auditory experience involves awareness of space. Second, we hear the locations of things and events by or in hearing the locations of their sounds. (...)
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