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  1. Ann Alpers (1998). Criminal Act or Palliative Care? Prosecutions Involving the Care of the Dying. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (4):308-331.
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  2. Jami L. Anderson, Comprehending the Distinctively Sexual Nature of the Conduct. Sex, Drugs and Rock and Roll.
    Since the 1970s, sexual assault laws have evolved to include prohibitions of sexual acts with cognitively impaired individuals. The argument justifying this prohibition is typically as follows: A sex act that is forced (without the legally valid consent of) someone is sexual assault. Cognitively impaired individuals, because they lack certain intellectual abilities, cannot give legally valid consent. Therefore, cognitively impaired individuals cannot consent to sex. Therefore, sex acts with cognitively impaired individuals is sexual assault. The prohibition of sex with such (...)
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  3. Jami L. Anderson (2009). Bodily Privacy, Toilets, and Sex Discrimination: The Problem of "Manhood" in a Women's Prison. In Olga Gershenson Barbara Penner (ed.), Ladies and Gents.
    Unjustifiable assumptions about sex and gender roles, the untamable potency of maleness, and gynophobic notions about women's bodies inform and influence a broad range of policy-making institutions in this society. In December 2004, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit continued this ignoble cultural pastime when they decided Everson v. Michigan Department of Corrections. In this decision, the Everson Court accepted the Michigan Department of Correction's claim that “the very manhood” of male prison guards both threatens the safety (...)
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  4. Sonu Bedi (2011). Why a Criminal Prohibition on Sex Selective Abortions Amounts to a Thought Crime. Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (3):349-360.
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  5. Thom Brooks (2010). Punishment. Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    The punishment of criminals is a topic of long-standing philosophical interest since the ancient Greeks. This interest has focused on several considerations, including the justification of punishment, who should be permitted to punish, and how we might best set punishments for crimes. This entry focuses on the most important contributions in this field. The focus will be on specific theoretical approaches to punishment including both traditional theories of punishment (retributivism, deterrence, rehabilitation) and more contemporary alternatives (expressivism, restorative justice, hybrid theories, (...)
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  6. Thom Brooks (2008). Shame on You, Shame on Me? Nussbaum on Shame Punishment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):322-334.
    abstract Shame punishments have become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional punishments, often taking the form of convicted criminals holding signs or sweeping streets with a toothbrush. In her Hiding from Humanity, Martha Nussbaum argues against the use of shame punishments because they contribute to an offender's loss of dignity. However, these concerns are shared already by the courts which also have concerns about the possibility that shaming might damage an offender's dignity. This situation has not led the courts to (...)
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  7. Antti Kauppinen (2014). Hate and Punishment. Journal of Interpersonal Violence:1-19.
    According to legal expressivism, neither crime nor punishment consists merely in intentionally imposing some kind of harm on another. Crime and punishment also have an expressive aspect. They are what they are in part because they enact attitudes toward others—in the case of crime, some kind of disrespect, at least, and in the case of punishment, society’s condemnation or reprobation. Punishment is justified, at least in part, because (and when) it uniquely expresses fitting condemnation or other retributive attitude. What makes (...)
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  8. Hyoungkoo Khang, Eyun-Jung Ki, In-Kon Park & Seon-Gi Baek (2012). Exploring Antecedents of Attitude and Intention Toward Internet Piracy Among College Students in South Korea. Asian Journal of Business Ethics 1 (2):177 - 194.
    Abstracts This study aims to examine the predictors of attitude and intentions toward Internet piracy in South Korea. Also, it intends to suggest a model of Internet piracy demonstrating the casual effects of factors of individual attitude and intentions toward Internet piracy. The results demonstrated that moral obligations and subjective norms are significant predictors of an individual’s attitude toward Internet piracy. Moreover, three factors—moral obligation, perceived behavioral control, and attitude—are essential antecedents of an individual’s intention to engage in Internet piracy. (...)
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  9. Jesper Ryberg (2014). Punishing Adolescents—On Immaturity and Diminished Responsibility. Neuroethics 7 (3):327-336.
    Should an adolescent offender be punished more leniently than an adult offender? Many theorists believe the answer to be in the affirmative. According to the diminished culpability model, adolescents are less mature than adults and, therefore, less responsible for their wrongdoings and should consequently be punished less harshly. This article concerns the first part of the model: the relation between immaturity and diminished responsibility. It is argued that this relation faces three normative challenges which do not allow for easy answers (...)
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  10. Gareth Sansom (2009). Strategies of Displacement and Other Violations of Territoriality : Cybercrime, the World Wide Web and the Ambit of Criminal Law. In Albert Breton (ed.), Multijuralism: Manifestations, Causes, and Consequences. Ashgate Pub..
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  11. Stephen J. Schulhofer (1990). The Gender Question in Criminal Law. Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (02):105-.
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  12. Lucinda Vandervort (2001). Mistake of Law and Obstruction of Justice: A 'Bad Excuse' ... Even for a Lawyer! University of New Brunswick Law Journal 50: 171-186.
    In Regina v. Murray, (2000, Ont S.Ct.J.) the learned trial judge, Justice Gravely, errs in his interpretation and application of the law of mens rea in the offense of willfully attempting to obstruct justice under section 139(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada. In view of his findings of fact and law, including the determination that the accused knowingly and intentionally committed the actus reus of the offense and the absence of any suggestion that he lacked awareness of any relevant (...)
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