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  1. Mark Alfino & G. Randolph Mayes (2003). Reconstructing the Right to Privacy. Social Theory & Practice 29 (1):1-18.
    The article undertakes to develop a theory of privacy considered as a fundamental moral right. The authors remind that the conception of the right to privacy is silent on the prospect of protecting informational privacy on consequentialist grounds. However, laws that prevent efficient marketing practices, speedy medical attention, equitable distribution of social resources, and criminal activity could all be justified by appeal to informational privacy as a fundamental right. Finally, the authors show that in the specter of terrorism, privacy can (...)
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  2. Gosseries Axel (2008). On Future Generations’ Future Rights. Journal of Political Philosophy 16 (4):446-474.
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  3. Hugo Adam Bedau (1982). Prisoners' Rights. Criminal Justice Ethics 1 (1):26-41.
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  4. Volkert Beekman (2008). Consumer Rights to Informed Choice on the Food Market. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1):61 - 72.
    The discourse about traceability in food chains focused on traceability as means towards the end of managing health risks. This discourse witnessed a call to broaden traceability to accommodate consumer concerns about foods that are not related to health. This call envisions the development of ethical traceability. This paper presents a justification of ethical traceability. The argument is couched in liberal distinctions, since the call for ethical traceability is based on intuitions about consumer rights to informed choice. The paper suggests (...)
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  5. Mark Bevir (2000). Derrida and the Heidegger Controversy: Global Friendship Against Racism. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (1):121-138.
  6. Robin Blackburn (2006). Return of the Proletariat? : Pension Rights and Pension Finance in an Ageing Society. In Lydia Morris (ed.), Rights: Sociological Perspectives. Routledge. 37.
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  7. William T. Blackstone (1978). On Rights and Responsibilities Pertaining to Toxic Substances and Trade Secrecy. Southern Journal of Philosophy 16 (1):589-603.
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  8. Mark Bovens (2002). Information Rights: Citizenship in the Information Society. Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (3):317–341.
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  9. Laurent Bussard, Anna Nano & Ulrich Pinsdorf (2009). Delegation of Access Rights in Multi-Domain Service Compositions. Identity in the Information Society 2 (2):137-154.
    Today, it becomes more and more common to combine services from different providers into one application. Service composition is however difficult and cumbersome when there is no common trust anchor. Hence, delegation of access rights across trust domains will become essential in service composition scenarios. This article specifies abstract delegation, discusses theoretical aspects of the concept, and provides technical details of a validation implementation supporting a variety of access controls and associated delegation mechanisms. Abstract delegation allows to harmonize the management (...)
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  10. Joseph S. Fulda, The Worst Way (Not) to Communicate.
    Evaluates e-mail critically from four perspectives. Note: This is /not/ the full version. The full version is available upon written request only.
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  11. Joseph S. Fulda (2012). Authors' Moral Rights—And How Editors and Publishers Routinely Abridge Them. Journal of Information Ethics 21 (2):7-9.
    Discusses a variety of maneuvers that editors and publishers, respectively, use with the untoward result that the author conveys something other than what and only what he intended to convey.
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  12. Joseph S. Fulda (2012). Written for the Moment. Journal of Information Ethics 21 (1):21-26.
    This article argues that the disclosure, dissemination, sale, and publication of texts—such as text messages, e-mails, and letters—addressed to anyone other than the public at large are gravely and profoundly immoral. The argument has two strands, the first based on a conception of privacy largely due to Steven Davis (2009), and the second based on the concept of authorial autonomy and its reverse, authorial dilution.
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  13. Michael Huemer (2008). The Drug Laws Don't Work. The Philosophers' Magazine (41):71-75.
    Illegal drugs are not inherently unclean, any more than alcohol, tobacco, or canola oil. All of these are simply chemicals that people choose to ingest for enjoyment, and that can harm our health if used to excess. Most of the sordid associations we have with illegal drugs are actually the product of the drug laws: it is because of the laws that drugs are sold on the black market, that Latin American crime bosses are made rich, that government officials are (...)
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  14. Michael Huemer (2003). Is There a Right to Own a Gun? Social Theory and Practice 29 (2):297-324.
    Individuals have a prima facie right to own firearms. This right is significant in view both of the role that such ownership plays in the lives of firearms enthusiasts and of the self-defense value of firearms. Nor is this right overridden by the social harms of private gun ownership. These harms have been greatly exaggerated and are probably considerably smaller than the benefits of private gun ownership. And I argue that the harms would have to be at least several times (...)
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  15. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2005). Altering Artworks. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (2):53-61.
    The grounds for recognizing that artists possess a personal “moral right of integrity” that would entitle them to prevent others from modifying their works are weak. There is, however, an important (and legislation-worthy) public interest in protecting highly-valued entities, including at least some works of art, from permanently destructive transformations.
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  16. Annabelle Lever (2012). Neuroscience V. Privacy? : A Democratic Perspective. In Sarah Richmond, Geraint Rees & Sarah J. L. Edwards (eds.), I Know What You're Thinking: Brain Imaging and Mental Privacy. Oxford University Press. 205.
    Recent developments in neuroscience create new opportunities for understanding the human brain. The power to do good, however, is also the power to harm, so scientific advances inevitably foster as many dystopian fears as utopian hopes. For instance, neuroscience lends itself to the fear that people will be forced to reveal thoughts and feelings which they would not have chosen to reveal, and of which they may be unaware. It also lends itself to the worry that people will be encouraged (...)
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  17. Jeppe von Platz (2013). Are Economic Liberties Basic Rights? Politics, Philosophy, and Economics (1):23-44.
    In this essay I discuss a powerful challenge to high-liberalism: the challenge presented by neoclassical liberals that the high-liberal assumptions and values imply that the full range of economic liberties are basic rights. If the claim is true, then the high-liberal road from ideals of democracy and democratic citizenship to left-liberal institutions is blocked. Indeed, in that case the high-liberal is committed to an institutional scheme more along the lines of laissez-faire capitalism than property-owning democracy. To present and discuss this (...)
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