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Speech Acts

Edited by Mitchell Green (University of Connecticut)
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  1. Peter Achinstein (1988). The Illocutionary Theory of Explanation. In Joseph C. Pitt (ed.), Theories of Explanation. Oxford University Press. 74--94.
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  2. Virgil C. Aldrich (1971). Illocutionary Space. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 32 (1):15-28.
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  3. Virgil C. Aldrich (1964). Do Linguistic Acts Make Me Tired? Philosophical Studies 15 (3):40 - 44.
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  4. William Alston (1999). Illocutionary Acts and Sentence Meaning. Cornell University Press.
    William P. Alston. difference in the scope of the rule reflects the fact that I-rules exist for the sake of making communication possible. Whereas their cousins are enacted and enforced for other reasons. We could distinguish I-rules just by this ...
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  5. William P. Alston (2007). L Illocutionary Acts and Truth. In Geo Siegwart & Dirk Griemann (eds.), Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language. Routledge. 5--9.
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  6. William P. Alston (2002). Illocutionary Acts and Sentence Meaning. Dialogue 41 (3):589-590.
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  7. William P. Alston (1964). Linguistic Acts. American Philosophical Quarterly 1 (2):138 - 146.
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  8. Acts Alston’S.‘Illocutionary (2007). Re Definition and Alston's 'Illocutionary Acts'friedrich Christoph Doerge University of Tübingen. Grazer Philosophische Studien 73:97-111.
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  9. Peter Alward (2009). Onstage Illocution. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (3):321 - 331.
    performances. But comparatively little work has been by way of elucidating such speech acts,[1] and without an adequate account of them, such comparisons will ultimately prove to be empty. In this paper, I will defend an illocutionary pretense view, according to which actors pretend to perform various kinds of illocutionary acts rather than genuinely performing them. This is, of course, a fairly intuitive position to take. What I want to argue, however, is that this is the route one must take: (...)
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  10. Paul Amselek & Zenon Bankowski (1986). Théorie des Actes de Langage, Éthique Et Droit. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  11. L. Apostel (1972). Illocutionary Forces and the Logic of Change. Mind 81 (322):208-224.
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  12. Nicholas Asher & Alex Lascarides (2001). Indirect Speech Acts. Synthese 128 (1-2):183 - 228.
    In this paper, we address several puzzles concerning speech acts,particularly indirect speech acts. We show how a formal semantictheory of discourse interpretation can be used to define speech actsand to avoid murky issues concerning the metaphysics of action. Weprovide a formally precise definition of indirect speech acts, includingthe subclass of so-called conventionalized indirect speech acts. Thisanalysis draws heavily on parallels between phenomena at the speechact level and the lexical level. First, we argue that, just as co-predicationshows that some words can (...)
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  13. Jarrod Atchison & Edward Panetta (2009). Intercollegiate Debate and Speech Communication. In A. Lunsford, K. Wilson & R. Eberly (eds.), Sage Handbook of Rhetorical Studies. Sage. 317.
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  14. J. L. Austin (1975). How to Do Things with Words. Clarendon Press.
    For this second edition, the editors have returned to Austin's original lecture notes, amending the printed text where it seemed necessary.
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  15. J. L. Austin & Hyakudai Sakamoto (1978). [How to Do Things with Words]. Japanese. Taishukan Publishing Company.
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  16. F. E. B. (1959). What Makes Acts Right? Review of Metaphysics 12 (3):486-486.
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  17. K. Bach & R. Harnish (1979). Linguistic Communication and Speech Acts. Mit Press.
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  18. Kent Bach, Speech Acts.
    The theory of speech acts is partly taxonomic and partly explanatory. It must systematically classify types of speech acts and the ways in which they can succeed or fail. It must reckon with the fact that the relationship between the words being used and the force of their utterance is often oblique. For example, the sentence 'This is a pig sty' might be used nonliterally to state that a certain room is messy and filthy and, further, to demand indirectly that (...)
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  19. Kent Bach & Robert M. Harnish (1992). How Performatives Really Work: A Reply to Searle. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 15 (1):93 - 110.
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  20. Archie J. Bahm (1960). What Makes Acts Right? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 20 (4):568-568.
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  21. Brian Ball (2014). Deriving the Norm of Assertion. Journal of Philosophical Research 39:75-85.
    Frank Hindriks has attempted to derive a variant of Timothy Williamson’s knowledge rule for assertion on the basis of a more fundamental belief expression analysis of that speech act. I show that his attempted derivation involves a crucial equivocation between two senses of ‘must,’ and therefore fails. I suggest two possible repairs; but I argue that even if they are successful, we should prefer Williamson’s fully general knowledge rule to Hindriks’s restricted moral norm.
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  22. Dorit Bar-on (2010). Expressing as 'Showing What's Within': On Mitchell Green's, Self-Expression Oup 2007. Philosophical Books 51 (4):212-227.
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  23. Stephen Barker (2015). Expressivism About Reference and Quantification Over the Non-Existent Without Meinongian Metaphysics. Erkenntnis 80 (S2):215-234.
    Can we believe that there are non-existent entities without commitment to the Meinongian metaphysics? This paper argues we can. What leads us from quantification over non-existent beings to Meinongianism is a general metaphysical assumption about reality at large, and not merely quantification over the non-existent. Broadly speaking, the assumption is that every being we talk about must have a real definition. It’s this assumption that drives us to enquire into the nature of beings like Pegasus, and what our relationship as (...)
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  24. Stephen Barker (2002). Review: Illocutionary Acts and Sentence Meaning. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (443):633-639.
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  25. Stephen J. Barker (2004). Renewing Meaning: A Speech-Act Theoretic Approach. Clarendon Press.
    Stephen Barker presents his first, ambitious book in the philosophy of language, setting out a radical alternative to standard theories of meaning.
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  26. Stephen J. Barker & Mihaela Popa-Wyatt (2015). Irony and the Dogma of Force and Sense. Analysis 75 (1):9-16.
    Frege’s distinction between force and sense is a central pillar of modern thinking about meaning. This is the idea that a self-standing utterance of a sentence S can be divided into two components. One is the proposition P that S’s linguistic meaning and context associates with it. The other is S’s illocutionary force. The force/sense distinction is associated with another thesis, the embedding principle, that implies that the only content that embeds in compound sentences is propositional content. We argue that (...)
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  27. Nancy Bauer (2006). How to Do Things With Pornography. In Sanford Shieh & Alice Crary (eds.), Reading Cavell.
  28. PamelaJ Benoit (1989). Relationship Arguments: An Interactionist Elaboration of Speech Acts. [REVIEW] Argumentation 3 (4):423-437.
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  29. Matthew A. Benton (forthcoming). Lying, Belief, and Knowledge. In Jörg Meibauer (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Lying. Oxford University Press.
    What is the relationship between lying, belief, and knowledge? Prominent accounts of lying define it in terms of belief, namely telling someone something one believes to be false, often with the intent to deceive. This paper develops a novel account of lying by deriving evaluative dimensions of responsibility from the knowledge norm of assertion. Lies are best understood as special cases of vicious assertion; lying is the anti-paradigm of proper assertion. This enables an account of lying in terms of knowledge: (...)
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  30. Matthew A. Benton (2016). Gricean Quality. Noûs (1).
    Some philosophers oppose recent arguments for the Knowledge Account of Assertion by claiming that assertion, being an act much like any other, will be subject to norms governing acts generally, such as those articulated by Grice for the purpose of successful, cooperative endeavours. But in fact, Grice is a traitor to their cause; or rather, they are his dissenters, not his disciples. Drawing on Grice's unpublished papers, I show that he thought of asserting as a special linguistic act in need (...)
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  31. Matthew A. Benton (2012). Assertion, Knowledge and Predictions. Analysis 72 (1):102-105.
    John N. Williams (1994) and Matthew Weiner (2005) invoke predictions in order to undermine the normative relevance of knowledge for assertions; in particular, Weiner argues, predictions are important counterexamples to the Knowledge Account of Assertion (KAA). I argue here that they are not true counterexamples at all, a point that can be agreed upon even by those who reject KAA.
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  32. Matthew A. Benton & John Turri (2014). Iffy Predictions and Proper Expectations. Synthese 191 (8):1857-1866.
    What individuates the speech act of prediction? The standard view is that prediction is individuated by the fact that it is the unique speech act that requires future-directed content. We argue against this view and two successor views. We then lay out several other potential strategies for individuating prediction, including the sort of view we favor. We suggest that prediction is individuated normatively and has a special connection to the epistemic standards of expectation. In the process, we advocate some constraints (...)
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  33. Federica Berdini & Claudia Bianchi, John Langshaw Austin. IEP- Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    J. L. Austin was one of the more influential British philosophers of his time, due to his rigorous thought, extraordinary personality, and innovative philosophical method. According to John Searle, he was both passionately loved and hated by his contemporaries. Like Socrates, he seemed to destroy all philosophical orthodoxy without presenting an alternative, equally comforting, orthodoxy. -/- Austin is best known for two major contributions to contemporary philosophy: first, his ‘linguistic phenomenology’, a peculiar method of philosophical analysis of the concepts and (...)
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  34. J. Berta (2005). Speech Acts From the Philosophical-Linguistic Perspective. Filozofia 60 (8):551-572.
    During the last decades the special literature has paid relatively much attention to the problematic of speech acts. However, in Slovakia it still remains underdeve-loped. Therefore the author decided to examine it from the points of view of its establishment, gradual development and interactional communication. The paper offers a survey of all philosophical-linguistic views on this problematic. Further, it gives a more detailed analysis of the theory of the founders of the speech acts theory , comparing their main ideas with (...)
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  35. Rod Bertolet (1994). Are There Indirect Speech Acts. In Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.), Foundations of Speech Act Theory: Philosophical and Linguistic Perspectives. Routledge. 335--349.
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  36. R.-J. Beun (2001). On the Generation of Coherent Dialogue: A Computational Approach. Pragmatics and Cognition 9 (1):37-68.
    A dialogue game is presented that enables us to generate coherent elementary conversational sequences at the speech act level. Central to this approach is the fact that the cognitive states of players change as a result of the interpretation of speech acts and that these changes provoke the production of a subsequent speech act. The rules of the game are roughly based on the Gricean maxims of co-operation — i.e., agents are forbidden to put forward information they do not believe (...)
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  37. Robbert-Jan Beun (2001). On the Generation of Coherent Dialogue: A Computational Approach. Pragmatics and Cognition 9 (1):37-68.
    A dialogue game is presented that enables us to generate coherent elementary conversational sequences at the speech act level. Central to this approach is the fact that the cognitive states of players change as a result of the interpretation of speech acts and that these changes provoke the production of a subsequent speech act. The rules of the game are roughly based on the Gricean maxims of co-operation ¿ i.e., agents are forbidden to put forward information they do not believe (...)
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  38. John Beversluis (1971). “I Know”: An Illocutionary Analysis. Southern Journal of Philosophy 9 (4):345-351.
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  39. Claudia Bianchi (2013). How to Do Things with (Recorded) Words. Philosophical Studies 167 (2):485-495.
    The aim of this paper is to evaluate which context determines the illocutionary force of written or recorded utterances—those involved in written texts, films and images, conceived as recordings that can be seen or heard in different occasions. More precisely, my paper deals with the “metaphysical” or constitutive role of context—as opposed to its epistemic or evidential role: my goal is to determine which context is semantically relevant in order to fix the illocutionary force of a speech act, as distinct (...)
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  40. Claudia Bianchi (2013). Pragmatics of Speech Actions, Handbooks of Pragmatics (HoPs) Vol. 2.
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  41. Claudia Bianchi (2009). Recording Speech Acts. Etica E Politica 11 (1):361-368.
    Indexicality is at the core of many major philosophical problems.1 In the last years, recorded messages and written notes have become a significant test and an intriguing puzzle for the semantics of indexical expressions.2 In this paper, I argue that a parallel may be drawn between the determination of the reference of the indexical expressions in recorded messages or written texts, and the determination of the illocutionary force of recorded or written utterances. To this aim, I will endorse the intention-based (...)
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  42. Claudia Bianchi (2008). Indexicals, Speech Acts and Pornography. Analysis 68 (300):310-316.
    In the last twenty years, recorded messages and written notes have become a significant test and an intriguing puzzle for the semantics of indexical expressions (see Smith 1989, Predelli 1996, 1998a,1998b, 2002, Corazza et al. 2002, Romdenh-Romluc 2002). In particular, the intention-based approach proposed by Stefano Predelli has proven to bear interesting relations to several major questions in philosophy of language. In a recent paper (Saul 2006), Jennifer Saul draws on the literature on indexicals and recorded messages in order to (...)
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  43. Alexander Bird (2002). Illocutionary Silencing. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (1):1–15.
    Rae Langton and Jennifer Hornsby have argued that pornography might create a climate whereby a woman’s ability to refuse sex is literally silenced or removed. Their central argument is that a failure of ‘uptake’ of the woman’s intention means that the illocutionary speech act of refusal has not taken place. In this paper, I challenge the claims from the Austinian philosophy of language which feature in this argument. I argue that uptake is not in general required for illocution, nor is (...)
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  44. Graham Bird (1992). Meaning and Speech Acts. Vol. I Principles of Language Use. Vol. II Semantics of Success and Satisfaction. Philosophical Books 33 (3):163-166.
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  45. Graham Bird (1987). Using Language: The Structures of Speech Acts. Philosophical Books 28 (1):32-35.
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  46. Graham Bird (1981). Austin's Theory of Illocutionary Force. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 6 (1):345-370.
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  47. Graham Bird (1981). The Inaugural Address: Analyzing Speech Acts. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 55:1 - 17.
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  48. Graham Bird (1979). Speech Acts and Conversation--II. Philosophical Quarterly 29 (115):142-152.
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  49. Graham Bird & David Holdcroft (1979). Words and Deeds. Problems in the Theory of Speech Acts. Philosophical Quarterly 29 (116):272.
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  50. John Biro (1978). Conventionality In Speech Acts. Southwest Philosophical Studies 3.
    The question of the relative importance and precise delineation of conventional and non-conventional elements in speech acts was regarded as central in their analysis by Austin himself, and has continued to exercise subsequent writers on the subject.
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