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  1. Steven G. Affeldt (2003). Review of Richard Eldridge (Ed.), Stanley Cavell. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (11).
    Including the substantial Introduction by Richard Eldridge, this volume consists of nine previously unpublished essays each of which focuses upon a single region of Cavell’s work. While the scope of the issues considered in the volume can be only incompletely indicated by listing the regions addressed, they include: ethics, philosophy of action, the normativity of language, aesthetics and modernism, American philosophy, Shakespeare, film, television, and opera, and the relation of Cavell’s work to German philosophy and Romanticism. The volume also contains (...)
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  2. Nancy Bauer (2012). Essai Sur Beauvoir, Cavell, Etc. [An Essay Concerning Beauvoir, Cavell, Etc.]. In Eliane Lecarme-Tabone & Jean-Louis Jeannelle (eds.), Cahiers de L'Herne: Beauvoir. L'Herne.
    The link is to an expanded, English version of this essay.
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  3. Nancy Bauer (2006). How to Do Things With Pornography. In Sanford Shieh & Alice Crary (eds.), Reading Cavell.
  4. Stanley Cavell (1996). The Cavell Reader. Blackwell.
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  5. Stanley Cavell (1995). Philosophical Passages: Wittgenstein, Emerson, Austin, Derrida. Blackwell.
    Introduction Cavell's Voices and Derrida's Grammatology The stature of Stanley Cavell is increasingly considered unique among living American philosophers ...
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  6. Stanley Cavell (1989/2013). This New yet Unapproachable America: Lectures After Emerson After Wittgenstein. Living Batch Press.
  7. Stanley Cavell (1988). Conditions Handsome and Unhandsome: The Constitution of Emersonian Perfectionism: The Carus Lectures, 1988. University Of Chicago Press.
    In these three lectures, Cavell situates Emerson at an intersection of three crossroads: a place where both philosophy and literature pass; where the two ...
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  8. Stanley Cavell (1988). Conditions Handsome and Unhandsome The Constitution of Emersonian Perfectionism: The Carus Lectures, 1988. University of Chicago Press.
    In these three lectures, Cavell situates Emerson at an intersection of three crossroads: a place where both philosophy and literature pass; where the two traditions of English and German philosophy shun one another; where the cultures of America and Europe unsettle one another.
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  9. Stanley Cavell (1988). In Quest of the Ordinary: Lines of Skepticism and Romanticism. University of Chicago Press.
    These lectures by one of the most influential and original philosophers of the twentieth century constitute a sustained argument for the philosophical basis of romanticism, particularly in its American rendering. Through his examination of such authors as Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Wordsworth, and Coleridge, Stanley Cavell shows that romanticism and American transcendentalism represent a serious philosophical response to the challenge of skepticism that underlies the writings of Wittgenstein and Austin on ordinary language.
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  10. Vincent Colapietro (2004). The Question of Voice and the Limits of Pragmatism: Emerson, Dewey, and Cavell. Metaphilosophy 35 (1-2):178-201.
    One criticism of pragmatism, forcefully articulated by Stanley Cavell, is that pragmatism fails to deal with mourning, understood in the psychoanalytic sense as grief-work (Trauerarbeit). Such work would seemingly be as pertinent to philosophical investigations (especially ones conducted by pragmatists) as to psychoanalytic explorations. Finding such themes as mourning and loss in R. W. Emerson's writings, Cavell warns against assimilating Emerson's voice to that of American pragmatism, especially Dewey's instrumentalism, for such assimilation risks the loss or repression of Emerson's voice (...)
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  11. James Conant (2005). Stanley Cavell's Wittgenstein. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 13 (1):50-64.
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  12. James Conant (1989). Must We Show What We Cannot Mean? In R. Fleming & M. Payne (eds.), The Senses of Stanley Cavell. Bucknell. 242--83.
  13. James Conant & Andrea Kern (2014). Varieties of Skepticism: Essays After Kant, Wittgenstein, and Cavell. De Gruyter.
  14. Alice Crary & Sanford Shieh (eds.) (2006). Reading Cavell. Routledge.
    Alongside Richard Rorty, Hilary Putnam and Jacques Derrida, Stanley Cavell is arguably one of the best-known philosophers in the world. In this state-of-the-art collection, Alice Crary explores the work of this original and interesting figure who has already been the subject of a number of books, conferences and Phd theses. A philosopher whose work encompasses a broad range of interests, such as Wittgenstein, scepticism in philosophy, the philosophy of art and film, Shakespeare, and philosophy of mind and language, Cavell has (...)
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  15. Espen Dahl (2011). On Morality of Speech: Cavell's Critique of Derrida. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 44 (1):81-101.
    This article tries to bring out the implication of Cavell’s critical comments on Derrida, clustered around Cavell’s charge that deconstruction entails a flight from the ordinary. Cavell’s and Derrida’s different readings of Austin’s ordinary language philosophy provide a common ground for elaborating their respective positions. Their writings are at once the closest but also the most divergent when addressing the moral implication of speech, or more precisely, when addressing their understanding of responsibility and voice. Employing Derrida’s so-called ‘double reading’ as (...)
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  16. Peter Dula (2010). Cavell, Companionship, and Christian Theology. Oxford University Press.
    Revision of author's thesis (Ph. D.)--Duke University, 2004 under title: Beautiful enemies: Cavell, companionship and Christian theology.
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  17. Richard Eldridge (2005). Review of Russell Goodman (Ed.), Contending with Stanley Cavell. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (8).
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  18. Richard Thomas Eldridge (ed.) (2003). Stanley Cavell. Cambridge University Press.
    Contemporary Philosophy in Focus offers a series of introductory volumes to many of the dominant philosophical thinkers of the current age. Stanley Cavell has been one of the most creative and independent of contemporary philosophical voices. At the core of his thought is the view that skepticism is not a theoretical position to be refuted by philosophical theory but is a reflection of the fundamental limits of human knowledge of the self, of others and of the external world that must (...)
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  19. Roberto Frega, Donatelli Piergiorgio & Laugier Sandra (2010). Pragmatism, Trascendentalism, and Perfectionism. European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 2 (2):iv-xiii.
    Introduction to the symposia on Pragmatism and Perfectionism appered on the European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy, vol. 2 issue 2, 2010.
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  20. Russell B. Goodman (1990). American Philosophy and the Romantic Tradition. Cambridge University Press.
    Professional philosophers have tended either to shrug off American philosophy as negligible or derivative or to date American philosophy from the work of twentieth century analytical positivists such as Quine. Russell Goodman expands on the revisionist position developed by Stanley Cavell, that the most interesting strain of American thought proceeds not from Puritan theology or from empirical science but from a peculiarly American kind of Romanticism. This insight leads Goodman, through Cavell, back to Emerson and Thoreau and thence to William (...)
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  21. Michael J. McGandy (2006). Review: Naoko Saito. The Gleam of Light: Moral Perfectionism and Education in Dewey and Emerson. American Philosophy Series. Foreword by Stanley Cavell New York: Fordham University Press, 2005. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):303-304.
  22. Edward F. Mooney (2003). Two Testimonies in American Philosophy: Stanley Cavell, Henry Bugbee. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (2):108-121.
  23. Stephen Mulhall (1994). Perfectionism, Politics and the Social Contract: Rawls and Cavell on Justice. Journal of Political Philosophy 2 (3):222–239.
  24. Andrew John Norris (ed.) (2006). The Claim to Community: Essays on Stanley Cavell and Political Philosophy. Stanford University Press.
    Stanley Cavell's unique contributions to the study of epistemology, ethics, aesthetics, film, Shakespeare, and American philosophy have all received wide acclaim. But there has been relatively little recognition of the pertinence of Cavell's work to our understanding of political philosophy. The Claim to Community fills this gap with essays from a wide range of prominent American, English, French, and Italian philosophers and political theorists, as well as a lengthy response to the essays by Cavell himself. The topics covered include Cavell's (...)
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  25. Søren Overgaard (2010). Ordinary Experience and the Epoché: Husserl and Heidegger Versus Rosen (and Cavell). [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (3):307-330.
    In various publications, Stanley Cavell and Stanley Rosen have emphasized the philosophical importance of what they both call the ordinary. They both contrast their recovery of the ordinary with traditional philosophy, including the phenomenological philosophy of Edmund Husserl. In this paper, I address Rosen’s claims in particular. I argue that Rosen turns the real situation on its head. Contra Rosen, it is not the case that the employment of Husserl’s epoché distorts the authentic voice of the ordinary—a voice that is (...)
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  26. Naoko Saito (2010). Beyond Monolingualism: Philosophy as Translation and the Understanding of Other Cultures. Ethics and Education 4 (2):131-139.
    Beyond a monolingual mentality and beyond the language that is typically observed in the prevalent discourse of education for understanding other cultures, this article tries to present another approach: Stanley Cavell's idea of philosophy as translation . This Cavellian approach shows that understanding foreign cultures involves a relation to other cultures already within one's native culture. Foreshadowing the Cavellian sense of tragedy, Emerson's 'Devil's child' helps us detect the sources of repression and blindness that are hidden behind the foundationalist approach (...)
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  27. Abraham D. Stone (2000). On Husserl and Cavellian Scepticism. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (198):1-21.