This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:
1065 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 1065
Material to categorize
  1. Peter Adamson (2003). Review: Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (446):363-366.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Lois Peters Agnew (2008). Outward, Visible Propriety: Stoic Philosophy and Eighteenth-Century British Rhetorics. University of South Carolina Press.
    Introduction -- Stoic ethics and rhetoric -- Eighteenth-century common sense and sensus communis -- Taste and sensus communis -- Propriety, sympathy, and style fusing individual and social -- Victorian language theories and the decline of sensus communis.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Sara Ahbel-Rappe (2008). Long's Essays (A.A.) Long From Epicurus to Epictetus. Studies in Hellenistic and Roman Philosophy. Pp. Xvi + 439. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2006. Cased, £55 (Paper, £24). ISBN: 978-0-19-927911-1 (978-0-19-927912-8 Pbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (02):396-.
  4. W. H. Alexander (1934). Notes on The De Beneficiis of Seneca. Classical Quarterly 28 (01):54-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. William Hardy Alexander (1932). Notes on the Text of Seneca's Letters. Classical Quarterly 26 (3-4):158-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. K. Algra (2003). Hellenistic Philosophy and Some Science. Phronesis 48 (1):71-88.
  7. Keimpe Algra (2009). Stoic Philosophical Theology and Graeco-Roman Religion. In Ricardo Salles (ed.), God and Cosmos in Stoicism. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Keimpe Algra (2007). Epictetus and Stoic Theology. In T. Scaltsas & Andrew S. Mason (eds.), The Philosophy of Epictetus. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Keimpe Algra (ed.) (2005). The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    A full account of the philosophy of the Greek and Roman worlds from the last days of Aristotle (c. 320 BC) until 100 BC. Hellenistic philosophy, for long relatively neglected and unappreciated, has over the last decade been the object of a considerable amount of scholarly attention. Now available in paperback, this volume is the first general reference work to pull the subject together and present an overview. The time has come for a general reference work which pulls the subject (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Keimpe Algra (2004). Hellenistic and Early Imperial Philosophy. [REVIEW] Phronesis 49 (2):202-217.
  11. Keimpe Algra (2001). Review: Aristotle and Hellenistic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Phronesis 46 (1):93 - 104.
  12. Keimpe Algra (2000). Hellenistic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Phronesis 45 (1):77 - 86.
  13. Keimpe Algra (1998). Aristotle and Hellenistic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Phronesis 43 (4):351 - 359.
  14. Keimpe Algra (1991). Posidonius, the Fragments. The Classical Review 41 (02):316-.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Keimpe Algra (1991). Posidonius, the Fragments L. Edelstein, I. G. Kidd (Edd.): Posidonius, Vol. I: The Fragments. (Cambridge Classical Texts and Commentaries, 13.) Second Edition. Pp. Lvi + 344. Cambridge University Press, 1989. £50. I. G. Kidd: Posidonius, Vol. II: The Commentary, (I) Testimonia and Fragments 1–149; (Ii) Fragments 150–293. (Cambridge Classical Texts and Commentaries, 14A, 14B.) 2 Vols. Vol. I: Pp. Xii + 551; Vol. II: Pp. Vi + 505 (Numbered 553–1058). Cambridge University Press, 1988. £75. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (02):316-319.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Keimpe Algra (1990). Chrysippus on Virtuous Abstention From Ugly Old Women (Plutarch, Sr 1038E–1039A). Classical Quarterly 40 (02):450-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Keimpe Algra (1988). The Early Stoics on the Immobility and Coherence of the Cosmos. Phronesis 33 (2):155-180.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. W. B. Anderson (1917). Notes on Seneca's Letters. Classical Quarterly 11 (02):102-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Julia Annas (2007). Ethics in Stoic Philosophy. Phronesis 52 (1):58-87.
    When examining the role of Stoic ethics within Stoic philosophy as a whole, it is useful for us to look at the Stoic view of the way in which philosophy is made up of parts. The aim is a synoptic and integrated understanding of the "theoremata" of all the parts, something which can be achieved in a variety of ways, either by subsequent integration of separate study of the three parts or by proceeding through 'mixed' presentations, which can be made (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Julia Annas (2007). Epictetus on Moral Perspectives. In T. Scaltsas & Andrew S. Mason (eds.), The Philosophy of Epictetus. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Julia Annas (2007). Ethics in Stoic Philosophy. Phronesis 52 (1):58 - 87.
    When examining the role of Stoic ethics within Stoic philosophy as a whole, it is useful for us to look at the Stoic view of the way in which philosophy is made up of parts. The aim is a synoptic and integrated understanding of the "theoremata" of all the parts, something which can be achieved in a variety of ways, either by subsequent integration of separate study of the three parts or by proceeding through 'mixed' presentations, which can be made (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Julia Annas (2006). Reading Seneca: Stoic Philosophy at Rome (Review). Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):449-456.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Julia Annas (1993). The Morality of Happiness. Oxford University Press.
    Ancient ethical theories, based on the notions of virtue and happiness, have struck many as an attractive alternative to modern theories. But we cannot find out whether this is true until we understand ancient ethics--and to do this we need to examine the basic structure of ancient ethical theory, not just the details of one or two theories. In this book, Annas brings together the results of a wide-ranging study of ancient ethical philosophy and presents it in a way that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Julia Annas (1989). Cicero on Stoic Moral Philosophy and Private Property. In Miriam T. Griffin & Jonathan Barnes (eds.), Philosophia Togata: Essays on Philosophy and Roman Society. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David Armstrong (2008). Be Angry and Sin Not" : Philodemus Versus the Stoics on Natural Bites and Natural Emotions. In John T. Fitzgerald (ed.), Passions and Moral Progress in Greco-Roman Thought. Routledge. 79--121.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. David Armstrong (1982). Senecan Soleo: Hercules Oetaeus 1767. Classical Quarterly 32 (01):239-.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. E. V. Arnold (1925). Stoicism and its Influence. By R. M. Wenley, Professor of Philosophy in the University of Michigan. One Vol. Pp. Xii + 194. London: G. G. Harrap and Co. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (3-4):91-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. E. Vernon Arnold (1914). Stoics and Sceptics Stoics and Sceptics: Four Lectures Delivered in Oxford During Hilary Term, 1913, for the Common University Fund. By Edwyn Bevan, Sometime Scholar of the New College, Oxford. . Pp. 152. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1913. 4s. 6d. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):62-63.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Edward Vernon Arnold (1911/1971). Roman Stoicism. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Elizabeth Asmis (2009). Seneca on Fortune and the Kingdom of God. In Shadi Bartsch & David Wray (eds.), Seneca and the Self. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Elizabeth Asmis (2007). Lucretius Venus and Stoic Zeus. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Elizabeth Asmis (1993). The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. Ancient Philosophy 13 (2):475-481.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Elizabeth Asmis (1990). Seneca's "On the Happy Life" and Stoic Individualism. Apeiron 23 (4):219 - 255.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Elizabeth Asmis (1990). The Poetic Theory of the Stoic 'Aristo'. Apeiron 23 (3):147 - 201.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Raymond Astbury (1988). H. K. Riikonen: Menippean Satire as a Literary Genre with Special Reference to Seneca's Apocolocyntosis. (Commentationes Humanarum Litterarum, 83.) Pp. 58. Helsinki: Societas Scientiarum Fennica, 1987. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (02):417-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Catherine Atherton (1993). The Stoics on Ambiguity. Cambridge University Press.
    Stoic work on ambiguity represents one of the most innovative, sophisticated, and rigorous contributions to philosophy and the study of language in western antiquity. This book is both the first comprehensive survey of the often difficult and scattered sources, and the first attempt to locate Stoic material in the rich array of contexts, ancient and modern, which alone can guarantee full appreciation of its subtlety, scope and complexity. The comparisons and contrasts which this book constructs will intrigue not just classical (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Catherine Atherton (1988). Hand Over Fist: The Failure of Stoic Rhetoric. Classical Quarterly 38 (02):392-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Marcus Aurelius (1993). The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius. Shambhala.
    All the notes to the Farquharson translation, amplifying the twelve books of the "Meditations," are included in this volume.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Marcus Aurelius (1989/2008). The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. Oxford University Press.
    This new edition brings Farquharson's authoritative 1944 translation up to date and includes a helpful introduction and notes for the student and general reader. Rutherford includes a selection of letters from Marcus to his tutor Fronto--most of which date from his earlier years--that offer personal detail and help to fill out the somber portrait of the emperor that is found in the Meditations.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Marcus Aurelius (1983). The Meditations. Hackett.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Marcus Aurelius (1964/2005). Meditations. Penguin Books.
    Few ancient works have been as influential as the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius, philosopher and emperor of Rome (A.D. 161–180). A series of spiritual exercises filled with wisdom, practical guidance, and profound understanding of human behavior, it remains one of the greatest works of spiritual and ethical reflection ever written. Marcus’s insights and advice—on everything from living in the world to coping with adversity and interacting with others—have made the Meditations required reading for statesmen and philosophers alike, while generations of (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Marcus Aurelius (1957/1958). Meditations. Mount Vernon, N.Y.,Peter Pauper Press.
    INTRODUCTION MARCUS AURELIUS ANTONINUS was born on April 26, AD 121. His real name was M. Annius Verus, and he was sprung of a noble family which claimed ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Marcus Aurelius (1932). Marcus Aurelius Antoninus to Himself. Macmillan and Co., Ltd..
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Marcus Aurelius (1747/1975). The Commentaries of the Emperor Marcus Antoninus, Containing His Maxims of Science and Rules of Life, Wrote for His Own Use and Address'd to Himself. Ams Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Marcus Aurelius, Lucian, Justin, Walter Pater & Irwin Edman (eds.) (1945). Marcus Aurelius and His Times. New York, Pub. For the Classics Club by W. J. Black.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. D. R. Shackleton Bailey (1979). Notes on Seneca's Quaestiones Naturales. Classical Quarterly 29 (02):448-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. D. R. Shackleton Bailey (1970). Emendations of Seneca. Classical Quarterly 20 (02):350-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. D. R. Shackleton Bailey (1969). Emendations of Seneca 'Rhetor'. Classical Quarterly 19 (02):320-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. D. Baltzly (2002). Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (2):235 – 236.
    Book Information Emotion and Peace of Mind: from Stoic agitation to Christian temptation. By Richard Sorabji. Oxford University Press. Oxford. 2000. Pp. xi + 499. Hardback, £30.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Dirk Baltzly, Stoicism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Stoicism was one of the new philosophical movements of the Hellenistic period. The name derives from the porch (stoa poikilê) in the Agora at Athens decorated with mural paintings, where the members of the school congregated, and their lectures were held. Unlike ‘epicurean,’ the sense of the English adjective ‘stoical’ is not utterly misleading with regard to its philosophical origins. The Stoics did, in fact, hold that emotions like fear or envy (or impassioned sexual attachments, or passionate love of anything (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1065