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  1. Joseph Anthony Amato (1990). Victims and Values: A History and a Theory of Suffering. Greenwood Press.
    This book conducts a timely inquiry into contemporary conscience and politics.
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  2. Antony Aumann (2014). The Relationship Between Aesthetic Value and Cognitive Value. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (2):117-127.
    It is sometimes held that “the aesthetic” and “the cognitive” are separate categories. Enterprises concerning the former and ones concerning the latter have different aims and values. They require distinct modes of attention and reward divergent kinds of appreciation. Thus, we must avoid running together aesthetic and cognitive matters. In this paper, I challenge the independence of these categories, but in unorthodox fashion. Most attempts proceed by arguing that cognitive values can bear upon aesthetic ones. I approach from the opposite (...)
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  3. Antony Aumann (2014). Emotion, Cognition, and the Value of Literature: The Case of Nietzsche's Genealogy. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (2):182-195.
    Near the end of the Republic, Plato challenges defenders of poetry to explain how it “not only gives pleasure but is beneficial . . . to human life.”1 We sometimes hear a heightened version of this demand. Partisans not just of poetry but also of literature in general are asked to establish that the arts they celebrate possess a distinctive or unique value. In other words, they must show that poetry and literature are irreplaceable and that we would lose some (...)
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  4. Antony Aumann (2013). Kierkegaard, Paraphrase, and the Unity of Form and Content. Philosophy Today 57 (4):376-387.
    On one standard view, paraphrasing Kierkegaard requires no special literary talent. It demands no particular flair for the poetic. However, Kierkegaard himself rejects this view. He says we cannot paraphrase in a straightforward fashion some of the ideas he expresses in a literary format. To use the words of Johannes Climacus, these ideas defy direct communication. In this paper, I piece together and defend the justification Kierkegaard offers for this position. I trace its origins to concerns raised by Lessing and (...)
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  5. Antony Aumann (2010). Kierkegaard on Indirect Communication, the Crowd, and a Monstrous Illusion. In Robert L. Perkins (ed.), International Kierkegaard Commentary: Point of View. Mercer University Press.
    Following the pattern set by the early German Romantics, Kierkegaard conveys many of his insights through literature rather than academic prose. What makes him a valuable member of this tradition is the theory he develops to support it, his so-called “theory of indirect communication.” The most exciting aspect of this theory concerns the alleged importance of indirect communication: Kierkegaard claims that there are some projects only it can accomplish. This paper provides a critical account of two arguments Kierkegaard offers in (...)
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  6. Antony Aumann (2008). Kierkegaard on the Need for Indirect Communication. Dissertation, Indiana University
    This dissertation concerns Kierkegaard’s theory of indirect communication. A central aspect of this theory is what I call the “indispensability thesis”: there are some projects only indirect communication can accomplish. The purpose of the dissertation is to disclose and assess the rationale behind the indispensability thesis. -/- A pair of questions guides the project. First, to what does ‘indirect communication’ refer? Two acceptable responses exist: (1) Kierkegaard’s version of Socrates’ midwifery method and (2) Kierkegaard’s use of artful literary devices. Second, (...)
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  7. Luc Boltanski (1999). Distant Suffering: Morality, Media, and Politics. Cambridge University Press.
    Distant Suffering examines the moral and political implications for a spectator of the distant suffering of others as presented through the media. What are the morally acceptable responses to the sight of suffering on television, for example, when the viewer cannot act directly to affect the circumstances in which the suffering takes place? Luc Boltanski argues that spectators can actively involve themselves and others by speaking about what they have seen and how they were affected by it. Developing ideas in (...)
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  8. E. V. Dashkova (2006). Stilʹ I Stilizat͡sii͡a V Filosofsko-Kulʹturologicheskom Kontekste: Monografii͡a. I͡uzhno-Rossiĭskiĭ Gos. Universitet Ėkonomiki I Servisa.
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  9. Fernando Escalante Gonzalbo (2006). In the Eyes of God: A Study on the Culture of Suffering. University of Texas Press, Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies.
    "Every culture needs to appropriate the universal truth of human suffering," says Fernando Escalante, ". . . to give its own meaning to this suffering, so that human existence is bearable." Originally published in Spanish as La mirada de Dios: Estudios sobre la cultura del sufrimiento, this book is a remarkable study of the evolution of the culture of suffering and the different elements that constitute it, beginning with a reading of Rousseau and ending with the appearance of the Shoah (...)
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  10. Sabine Frommel & Antonio Brucculeri (eds.) (2012). L'idée du Style Dans l'Historiographie Artistique: Variantes Nationales Et Transmissions. Campisano.
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  11. Giancarlo Galeazzi (ed.) (2004). Ripensare la Sofferenza. Città Aperta.
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  12. James R. Hamilton (2009). Drama. In Higgins Davies (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Aesthetics.
    Hamilton explains why "drama" is a category of literature rather than of theater, even though it is appropriate to describe many theatrical performances as "dramatic." Consideration of the possibilities of theatrical performance are especially important to this category of literature, but need not be (and often are not) decisive in constraining interpretations of dramatic works.
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  13. James R. Hamilton (2009). Pretense and Display Theories of Theatrical Performance. Organon F (4):632-654.
    A survey of and a comparison of the relative strengths of two favored views of what theatrical performers do: pretend or engage in a variety of self-display. The behavioral version of the pretense theory is shown to be relatively weak as an instrument for understanding the variety of performance styles available in world theater. Whether pretense works as a theory of the mental capacities that underly theatrical performance is a separate question.
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  14. James R. Hamilton (2007). The Art of Theater. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Hamilton argues that theatrical performances have always been regarded as works produced for inspection and evaluation in their own right. The reason this has been obscured is the enormously successful text-based literary tradition in modern European theater. To show why this is as it should be, Hamilton shows how theater's spectators pick out, grasp, and assess performances without reference to the texts they employ, even within that successful literary tradition.
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  15. Marvin Henberg (1990). Retribution: Evil for Evil in Ethics, Law, and Literature. Temple University Press.
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  16. Santiago Kovadloff (2009). El Enigma Del Sufrimiento. Emecé.
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  17. Berel Lang (ed.) (1987). The Concept of Style. Cornell University Press.
    ILLUSTRATIONS Chapter 2 1. Roy Lichtenstein, Little Big Painting 83 2. Luis Buriuel, Viridiana (Last Supper scene) 86 3. ...
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  18. Leonard B. Meyer & Berel Lang (eds.) (1979). The Concept of Style. University of Pennsylvania Press.
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  19. John Reed (2010). Tales of Woe. Distributed by Powerhouse Books.
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  20. Eric R. Severson (ed.) (2010). I More Than Others: Responses to Evil and Suffering. Cambridge Scholars Pub..
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  21. Richard Shusterman (2011). Somatic Style. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (2):147-159.
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  22. Caroline van Eck, James McAllister & Renée van de Vall (eds.) (1995). The Question of Style in Philosophy and the Arts. Cambridge University Press.
    The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries witnessed a change in the perception of the arts and of philosophy. In the arts this transition occurred around 1800, with, for instance, the breakdown of Vitruvianism in architecture, while in philosophy the foundationalism of which Descartes and Spinoza were paradigmatic representatives, which presumed that philosophy and the sciences possessed a method of ensuring the demonstration of truths, was undermined by the idea, asserted by Nietzsche and Wittgenstein, that there exist alternative styles of enquiry among (...)
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