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  1. Martin Davies (1980). A Note on Substitutional Quantification. Noûs 14 (4):619-622.
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  2. J. Michael Dunn & Nuel D. Belnap Jr (1968). The Substitution Interpretation of the Quantifiers. Noûs 2 (2):177-185.
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  3. Gareth Evans & John Henry McDowell (eds.) (1976). Truth and Meaning: Essays in Semantics. Clarendon Press.
    Truth and Meaning is a classic collection of original essays on fundamental questions in the philosophy of language.
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  4. Dale Gottlieb (1980). Ontological Economy: Substitutional Quantification and Mathematics. Oxford University Press.
  5. Dale Gottlieb & Timothy McCarthy (1979). Substitutional Quantification and Set Theory. Journal of Philosophical Logic 8 (1):315 - 331.
  6. Michael Hand (1992). Meaning, Truth-Conditions, and Substitutional Quantification. Philosophical Studies 68 (2):195 - 216.
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  7. Gilbert Harman (1971). Substitutional Quantification and Quotation. Noûs 5 (2):213-214.
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  8. Philip Hugly & Charles Sayward (2002). There Is A Problem with Substitutional Quantification. Theoria 68 (1):4-12.
    Whereas arithmetical quantification is substitutional in the sense that a some-quantification is true only if some instance of it is true, it does not follow (and, in fact, is not true) that an account of the truth-conditions of the sentences of the language of arithmetic can be given by a substitutional semantics. A substitutional semantics fails in a most fundamental fashion: it fails to articulate the truth-conditions of the quantifications with which it is concerned. This is what is defended in (...)
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  9. Philip Hugly & Charles Sayward (1987). Why Substitutional Quantification Does Not Express Existence. Theory and Decision 50:67-75.
    Fundamental to Quine’s philosophy of logic is the thesis that substitutional quantification does not express existence. This paper considers the content of this claim and the reasons for thinking it is true.
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  10. Philip Hugly & Charles Sayward (1982). Indenumerability and Substitutional Quantification. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 23 (4):358-366.
    We here establish two theorems which refute a pair of what we believe to be plausible assumptions about differences between objectual and substitutional quantification. The assumptions (roughly stated) are as follows: (1) there is at least one set d and denumerable first order language L such that d is the domain set of no interpretation of L in which objectual and substitutional quantification coincide. (2) There exist interpreted, denumerable, first order languages K with indenumerable domains such that substitutional quantification deviates (...)
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  11. Peter Inwagen (1981). Why I Don't Understand Substitutional Quantification. Philosophical Studies 39 (3):281 - 285.
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  12. Saul A. Kripke (1976). Is There a Problem About Substitutional Quantification? In Gareth Evans & John McDowell (eds.), Truth and Meaning. Oxford University Press. 324-419.
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  13. Guido Küng & John Thomas Canty (1970). Substitutional Quantification and Le'sniewskian Quantifiers. Theoria 36 (2):165-182.
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  14. H. A. Lewis (1985). Substitutional Quantification and Nonstandard Quantifiers. Noûs 19 (3):447-451.
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  15. Friederike Moltmann (2004). Nonreferential Complements, Nominalizations, and Derived Objects. Journal of Semantics 21 (1):1-43.
    This paper argues that certain complements in philosophically significant constructions, especially predicative and clausal complements and intensional NPs, should not be analysed as providing an argument for a relation expressed by the verb, but rather as forming a complex predicate together with the verb. Apparent evidence for the traditional relational analyses, namely the possibility of replacing the complement by quantifiers such as 'something', will be shown to be misguided. Quantifiers like 'something' rather act as nominalizing expressions introducing ‘new’, derived objects (...)
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  16. Friederike Moltmann (2003). Nominalizing Quantifiers. Journal of Philosophical Logic 32 (5):445-481.
    Quantified expressions in natural language generally are taken to act like quantifiers in logic, which either range over entities that need to satisfy or not satisfy the predicate in order for the sentence to be true or otherwise are substitutional quantifiers. I will argue that there is a philosophically rather important class of quantified expressions in English that act quite differently, a class that includes something, nothing, and several things. In addition to expressing quantification, such expressions act like nominalizations, introducing (...)
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  17. Charles Parsons (1982). Substitutional Quantification and Mathematics. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (4):409-421.
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  18. Charles Parsons (1976). Much Ado About Substitutional Quantification. Journal of Philosophy 73 (18):651-653.
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  19. Charles Parsons (1971). A Plea for Substitutional Quantification. Journal of Philosophy 68 (8):231-237.
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  20. John Wallace (1971). Convention T and Substitutional Quantification. Noûs 5 (2):199-211.
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