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  1. Thomas Adajian (2006). Visual Music: Synaesthesia in Art and Music Since 1900 Edited by Brougher, Kerry, Olivia Mattis, Jeremy Strick, Ari Wiseman and Judith Zilczer. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):488–489.
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  2. Sean Allen-Hermanson & Jennifer Matey (2012). Synesthesia. In J. Feiser & B. Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  3. Torin Alter (2006). Does Synesthesia Undermine Representationalism? Psyche 12 (5).
    Does synesthesia undermine representationalism? Gregg Rosenberg (2004) argues that it does. On his view, synesthesia illustrates how phenomenal properties can vary independently of representational properties. So, for example, he argues that sound/color synesthetic experiences show that visual experiences do not always represent spatial properties. I will argue that the representationalist can plausibly answer Rosenberg.
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  4. Bryan D. Alvarez & Lynn C. Robertson (2013). Synesthesia and Binding. In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. 317.
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  5. Malika Auvray & Ophelia Deroy (forthcoming). How Do Synesthetes Experience the World. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press.
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  6. K. Barnett & F. Newell (2008). Synaesthesia is Associated with Enhanced, Self-Rated Visual Imagery. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):1032-1039.
    Although the condition known as synaesthesia is currently undergoing a scientific resurgence, to date the literature has largely focused on the heterogeneous nature of synaesthesia across individuals. In order to provide a better understanding of synaesthesia, however, general characteristics need to be investigated. Synaesthetic experiences are often described as occurring ‘internally’ or in the ‘mind’s eye’, which is remarkably similar to how we would describe our experience of visual mental imagery. We assessed the role of visual imagery in synaesthesia by (...)
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  7. Simon Baron-Cohen, D. Bor, J. Billington, J. Asher, S. Wheelwright & C. Ashwin (2007). Savant Memory in a Man with Colour Form-Number Synaesthesia and Asperger. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (s 9-10):237-251.
    Extreme conditions like savantism, autism or synaesthesia, which have a neurological 2AH, UK basis, challenge the idea that other minds are similar to our own. In this paper we report a single case study of a man in whom all three of these conditions co-occur. We suggest, on the basis of this single case, that when savantism and synaesthesia co- occur, it is worthwhile testing for an undiagnosed Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC). This is because savantism has an established association with (...)
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  8. David Brang, Ursina Teuscher, V. S. Ramachandran & Seana Coulson (2010). Temporal Sequences, Synesthetic Mappings, and Cultural Biases: The Geography of Time. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):311-320.
    Time–space synesthetes report that they experience the months of the year as having a spatial layout. In Study 1, we characterize the phenomenology of calendar sequences produced by synesthetes and non-synesthetes, and show a conservative estimate of time–space synesthesia at 2.2% of the population. We demonstrate that synesthetes most commonly experience the months in a circular path, while non-synesthetes default to linear rows or rectangles. Study 2 compared synesthetes’ and non-synesthetes’ ability to memorize a novel spatial calendar, and revealed better (...)
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  9. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Seeing as a Non-Experiental Mental State: The Case From Synesthesia and Visual Imagery. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Neuroscience Series, Synthese Library.
    The paper argues that the English verb ‘to see’ can denote three different kinds of conscious states of seeing, involving visual experiences, visual seeming states and introspective seeming states, respectively. The case for the claim that there are three kinds of seeing comes from synesthesia and visual imagery. Synesthesia is a relatively rare neurological condition in which stimulation in one sensory or cognitive stream involuntarily leads to associated experiences in a second unstimulated stream. Visual synesthesia is often considered a case (...)
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  10. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Synesthetic Binding and the Reactivation Model of Memory. In Ophelia Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blendings: New essays on synaesthesia. Oxford University Press.
    Despite the recent surge in research on, and interest in, synesthesia, the mechanism underlying this condition is still unknown. Feedforward mechanisms involving overlapping receptive fields of sensory neurons as well as feedback mechanisms involving a lack of signal disinhibition have been proposed. Here I show that a broad range of studies of developmental synesthesia indicate that the mechanism underlying the phenomenon may involve reinstatement of brain activity in different sensory or cognitive streams in a way that is similar to what (...)
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  11. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Varieties of Synesthetic Experience. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Neuroscience Series, Synthese Library.
    In her response to my "Seeing as a Non-Experiental Mental State: The Case from Synesthesia and Visual Imagery" Ophelia Deroy presents an argument for an interesting new account of synesthesia. On this account, synesthesia can be thought of as "a perceptual state (e.g. of a letter)" that is "changed or enriched by the incorporation of a conscious mental image (e.g. a color)." I reply that while this is a plausible account of some types of synesthesia, some forms cannot be accounted (...)
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  12. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Color Synesthesia. In Kimberly A. Jameson (ed.), Cognition & Language, Encyclopedia of Color Science and Technology. Springer.
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  13. Berit Brogaard, Kristian Marlow & Kevin Rice (forthcoming). The Long-Term Potentiation Model for Grapheme-Color Binding in Synesthesia. In David Bennett & Chris Hill (eds.), Sensory Integration and the Unity of Consciousness. MIT Press.
    The phenomenon of synesthesia has undergone an invigoration of research interest and empirical progress over the past decade. Studies investigating the cognitive mechanisms underlying synesthesia have yielded insight into neural processes behind such cognitive operations as attention, memory, spatial phenomenology and inter-modal processes. However, the structural and functional mechanisms underlying synesthesia still remain contentious and hypothetical. The first section of the present paper reviews recent research on grapheme-color synesthesia, one of the most common forms of synesthesia, and addresses the ongoing (...)
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  14. Berit Brogaard, Simo Vanni & Juha Silvanto (forthcoming). Seeing Mathematics: Perception and Brain Activity in a Case of Acquired Synesthesia. Neurocase.
    We studied the patient JP who has exceptional abilities to draw complex geometrical images by hand and a form of acquired synesthesia for mathematical formulas and objects, which he perceives as geometrical figures. JP sees all smooth curvatures as discrete lines, similarly regardless of scale. We carried out two preliminary investigations to establish the perceptual nature of synesthetic experience and to investigate the neural basis of this phenomenon. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, image-inducing formulas produced larger fMRI (...)
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  15. Alicia Callejas & Juan Lupiáñez (2013). Synesthesia, Incongruence, and Emotionality. In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. 347.
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  16. Clive Cazeaux (1999). Synaesthesia and Epistemology in Abstract Painting. British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (3):241-251.
  17. R. Cohen Kadosh & L. Gertner (2011). Synesthesia: Gluing Together Time, Number and Space. In Stanislas Dehaene & Elizabeth Brannon (eds.), Space, Time and Number in the Brain. Oxford University Press.
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  18. E. M. R. Critchley (1994). Synaesthesia. In E. Critchley (ed.), The Neurological Boundaries of Reality. Farrand. 116.
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  19. Richard Cytowic (1995). Synesthesia: Phenomenology and Neuropsychology. Psyche 2 (10).
  20. Richard E. Cytowic (2013). Synesthesia in the Twentieth Century. In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. 399.
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  21. Stephen Davies (2010). Perceiving Melodies and Perceiving Musical Colors. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (1):19-39.
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  22. S. Day (2005). Some Demographic and Socio-Cultural Perspectives of Synaesthesia,[W:] LC Robertson, N. Sagiv (Red.). In Robertson, C. L. & N. Sagiv (eds.), Synesthesia: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
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  23. Sean Day (1995). Synaesthesia and the Borders of the Senses. Semiotics:270-278.
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  24. Sean Day & Charls Pearson (2007). An Experimental Program to Use Synesthesia to Investigate Semantic Structure of the Sign. Semiotics:129-141.
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  25. Mario de Caro, Francesco Ferretti & Massimo Marraffa (eds.) (2007). Cartographies of the Mind: Philosophy and Psychology in Intersection. Kleuwer.
  26. Mario de Caro, Francesco Ferretti & Massimo Marraffa (eds.) (2007). Cartographies of the Mind: Philosophy and Psychology in Intersection , Series: Studies in Brain and Mind, Vol. 4. Kleuwer.
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  27. Ophelia Deroy (ed.) (forthcoming). Sensory Blendings: New Essays on Synaesthesia. Oxford University Press.
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  28. M. Dixon, Daniel Smilek, C. Cudahy & Philip M. Merikle (2000). Five Plus Two Equals Yellow: Mental Arithmetic in People with Synaesthesia is Not Coloured by Visual Experience. Nature 406.
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  29. June E. Downey (1912). Literary Synesthesia. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 9 (18):490-498.
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  30. Peter Es Freund (2009). Social Synaesthesia: Expressive Bodies, Embodied Charisma. Body and Society 15 (4):21-31.
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  31. Rosalind Galt (2011). Doing Away with Words : Synaesthetic Dislocations in Okinawa and Hong Kong. In John David Rhodes & Elena Gorfinkel (eds.), Taking Place: Location and the Moving Image. University of Minnesota Press.
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  32. John G. Gammack (2002). Language, Vision, and Music. Amsterdam: J Benjamins.
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  33. John G. Gammack (2002). Synaesthesia and Knowing. In Language, Vision, and Music. Amsterdam: J Benjamins.
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  34. Dimitria Electra Gatzia & Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Psilocybin, LSD, Mescaline and Drug-Induced Synesthesia. In Victor R. Preedy (ed.), The Neuropathology Of Drug Addictions And Substance Misuse. Elsevier.
    Studies have shown that both serotonin and glutamate receptor systems play a crucial role in the mechanisms underlying drug-induced synesthesia. The specific nature of these mechanisms, however, continues to remain elusive. Here we propose two distinct hypotheses for how synesthesia triggered by hallucinogens in the serotonin-agonist family may occur. One hypothesis is that the drug-induced destabilization of thalamic projections via GABAergic neuronal circuits from sensory areas leads to a disruption of low-level, spontaneous integration of multisensory stimuli. This sort of integration (...)
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  35. Rocco J. Gennaro (2012). Synesthesia, Experiential Parts, and Conscious Unity. Philosophy Study 2:73-80.
    Synesthesia is the “union of the senses” whereby two or more of the five senses that are normally experienced separately are involuntarily and automatically joined together in experience. For example, some synesthetes experience a color when they hear a sound or see a letter. In this paper, I examine two cases of synesthesia in light of the notions of “experiential parts” and “conscious unity.” I first provide some background on the unity of consciousness and the question of experiential parts. I (...)
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  36. Limor Gertner, Avishai Henik & Roi Cohen Kadosh (2009). When 9 is Not on the Right: Implications From Number-Form Synesthesia. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):366-374.
    Number-form synesthetes consciously experience numbers in spatially-defined locations. For non-synesthete individuals, a similar association of numbers and space appears in the form of an implicit mental number line as signified by the distance effect–reaction time decreases as the numerical distance between compared numbers increases. In the current experiment, three number-form synesthetes and two different non-synesthete control groups performed a number comparison task. Synesthete participants exhibited a sizeable distance effect only when presented numbers were congruent with their number-form. In contrast, the (...)
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  37. Jeffrey A. Gray (2005). Synesthesia: A Window on the Hard Problem of Consciousness. In Lynn C. Robertson & Noam Sagiv (eds.), Synesthesia: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 127-146.
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  38. Jeffrey A. Gray & Nunn J. Chopping S. (2002). Implications of Synaesthesia for Functionalism: Theory and Experiments. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (12):5-31.
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  39. Richard Gray (2004). What Synaesthesia Really Tells Us About Functionalism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (9):64-69.
    J. A. Gray et al. have recently argued that synaesthesia can be used as a counterexample to functionalism. They provide empirical evidence which they hold supports two anti-functionalist claims: disparate functions share the same types of qualia and the effects of synaesthetic qualia are, contrary to what one would expect from evolutionary considerations, adverse to those functions with which those types of qualia are normally linked. I argue that the empirical evidence they cite does not rule out functionalism, rather the (...)
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  40. Richard Gray (2001). Cognitive Modules, Synaesthesia and the Constitution of Psychological Natural Kinds. Philosophical Psychology 14 (1):65-82.
    Fodor claims that cognitive modules can be thought of as constituting a psychological natural kind in virtue of their possession of most or all of nine specified properties. The challenge to this considered here comes from synaesthesia. Synaesthesia is a type of cross-modal association: input to one sensory modality reliably generates an additional sensory output that is usually generated by the input to a distinct sensory modality. The most common form of synaesthesia manifests Fodor's nine specified properties of modularity, and (...)
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  41. Richard Gray (2001). Synaesthesia: An Essay in Philosophical Psychology. Dissertation, University of Edinburgh
  42. Richard Gray (2001). Synaesthesia and Misrepresentation: A Reply to Wager. Philosophical Psychology 14 (3):339-46.
    Wager has argued that synaesthesia provides material for a counterexample to representational theories of the phenomenal character of experience. He gives a series of three cases based on synaesthesia; he requires the second and third cases to bolster the doubtfulness of the first. Here I further endorse the problematic nature of the first case and then show why the other two cases do not save his argument. I claim that whenever synaesthesia is a credible possibility its phenomenal character can be (...)
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  43. Fee-Alexandra Haase (2005). My Colorful Lexicon': Synesthesia and the Production of Metaphors or'Is Reading Synesthetic. A Parte Rei: Revista de Filosofía 39:12.
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  44. Peter Hancock (2013). Synesthesia, Alphabet Books, and Fridge Magnets. In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press. 83.
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  45. Michel ter Hark (2009). Coloured Vowels: Wittgenstein on Synaesthesia and Secondary Meaning. Philosophia 37 (4):589-604.
    The aim of this article is to give both a sustained interpretation of Wittgenstein’s obscure remarks on the experience of meaning of language, synthaesthesia and secondary use and to apply his insights to recent philosophical discussions about synthaesthesia. I argue that synthaesthesia and experience of meaning are conceptually related to aspect-seeing. The concept of aspect-seeing is not reducible to either seeing or imaging but involves a modified notion of experience. Likewise, synthaesthesia involves a modified notion of experience. In particular, the (...)
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  46. Vincent Hendricks (ed.) (forthcoming). Synesthe Volume.
  47. M. Hochel, E. G. Milan, A. Gonzalez, F. Tornay, K. McKenney, R. Diaz Caviedes, J. L. Mata Martin, M. A. Rodriguez Artacho, E. Dominguez Garcia & J. Vila (2007). Experimental Study of Phantom Colours in a Colour Blind Synaesthete. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (4):75-95.
    Synaesthesia is a condition in which one type of stimulation evokes the sensation of another, as when the hearing of a sound produces photisms, i.e. mental percepts of colours. R is a 20 year old colour blind subject who, in addition to the relatively common grapheme-colour synaesthesia, presents a rarely reported cross modal perception in which a variety of visual stimuli elicit aura-like percepts of colour. In R, photisms seem to be closely related to the affective valence of stimuli and (...)
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  48. Nicholas Horsfall (2005). Synaesthesia C. Catrein: Vertauschte Sinne. Untersuchungen zur Synästhesie in der römischen Dichtung . (Beiträge zur Altertumskunde 178.) Pp. 240. Munich and Leipzig: K. G. Saur Verlag, 2003. Cased, €82. ISBN: 3-598-77727-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (02):491-.
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  49. Edward M. Hubbard, A. Cyrus Arman, Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Geoffrey M. Boynton (2005). Individual Differences Among Grapheme-Color Synesthetes: Brain-Behavior Correlations. Neuron 5 (6):975-985.
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  50. Edward M. Hubbard, Sanjay Manohar & Vilayanur S. Ramachandran (2006). Contrast Affects the Strength of Synesthetic Colors. Cortex (Special Issue on Synesthesia) 42 (2):184-194.
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