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Government and Binding
  1. José Bonneau, Pierre Pica & Takashi Nakajima (1999). Non-Restrictive Distinction in Possessive Nominals. In Kimary Shahin, Susan Blake & Eun-Sook Kim (eds.), Proceedings of the 17th West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics. CLSI.
    We propose that the restrictive/non restrictive distinction found in relative clauses corresponds to the Inalienable vs Alienable distinction of the Nominal Possessive constructions. We propose to extend this distinction to adjectives suggesting that is not construction specific.
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  2. Noam Chomsky (1981). Lectures on Government and Binding. Foris.
    A more extensive discussion of certain of the more technical notions appears in my paper "On Binding" (Chomsky,; henceforth, OB). ...
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  3. Pierre Pica (1995). Condition C and Epistemic Contexts : A Case Study of Epithets and Anti-Logophoricity Pronouns in French. In Young-Sun Kim, Byung-Choon Lee, Kyoung-Jae Lee, Kyun-Kwon Yang & Jong-Kuri Yoon (eds.), A Festchrift for Dong-Whee Yang. Hankuk Publishing.
    Epithets and pronominals 'en' and 'y' in French have a variety of Binding properties that are unexpected on conventional approach to Binding Theory. We argue that the linguistic variety observed cross-linguistically (and perhaps, more surprinsingly, within a single language) - derives from the morphological properties of the anaphoric element - which we claim lack number features. Epithets and pronominal like 'en' and 'y' are predicates modifying null but semantically active nouns, and must theefore refer to the Speaker. These properties, we (...)
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  4. Pierre Pica (1992). Projeter-Alpha Ou la Langue Cachée. In Liliane Tasmowksi & Anne Zribi-Hertz (eds.), De la musique à la linguistique. Hommages à Nicolas Ruwet. Communication & Cognition.
    The article shows that the arugument of a verb can be projected in diffrent ways according to the meaning (agentive or not) of the predicate. An analysis is developed which suggests a modification of the projection principle according to which this principle is in part an interpretative principle, not a principle of the core grammmar.
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  5. Pierre Pica (1990). The Case for Reflexives or Reflexives for Case. In Karen Deaton, Manuela Noske & Michael Ziolkowski (eds.), Proceedings from the 26th Regional Meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society. Chicago Linguistic Society.
    It is claimed that the English genitive marker 's' suprisingly mirrors- at least in some dialects of English - the three main different usage of the mono-morphemic reflexives such as 'se' in French. A solution to this paradox already noted by Jespersen (1918) is proposed drawing on Watkins paradox according to which the study of what looks like 'social' parameters might be relevant for linguistics.
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  6. Pierre Pica (1988). Sur le Caractère Inaliénable de L'Être. In Pierre Pica & Tibor Papp (eds.), Transparence et opacité. Littérature et sciences cognitives. Cerf. 207--221.
  7. Pierre Pica (1987). On the Nature of the Reflexivization Cycle. In Joyce McDunough & Bernadette Plunkett (eds.), Proceedings of The North East Linguistic Society. 17--2.
    This article claims that one has to distinguish between X° reflexives which do not bear phi-features, such as number, and XP complex reflexive - which do bear such features. The presence/vs absence of features, it is argued, explains the behavior of so called long distance reflexives - first observed, within the generative tradition, in scandinavian languages - but present all over. The observation according to which XP reflexives are clause bound, while X° reflexives in argument position are not, is some (...)
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  8. Pierre Pica (1986). De Quelques Implications Théoriques de l'Étude des Relations À Longue Distance. In Mitsou Ronat & Daniel Couquaux (eds.), La grammaire modulaire. Minuit. 187--209.
    Nous distinguons deux types d'anaphores en montrant que la comprehension des relations à longue distance met en jeu plusieurs propriétés de la grammaire comme l'association, ou non, avec un rôle thématique, ou à une position argumentale, et montrons comment les mécanismes mis en jeu sont universels - et ont des conséquences sur l'architecture de la grammaire (sur la définition de la notion de c-commande par exemple). L'article montre en particulier qu'il ne peut y avoir de réciproque ou de clitique lié (...)
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  9. Pierre Pica (1986). Subject, Tense and Truth. In Jacqueline Guéron, Hans-Georg Obenauer & Jean-Yves Pollock (eds.), Grammatical Representations. Foris.
    It is suggested that the notion of truth value plays a role in syntactic theory and should be incorporated in the appropriate formulation of conditions on transformations.
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  10. Pierre Pica (1981). Some Theoretical Implications of the Study of NP-Movement in Some Scandinavian Languages. In Thorstein Fretheim & Lars Hellan (eds.), Papers from the sixth Scandinavian Conference of Linguistics.
    We argue that there exist two kinds of passive structures, a) one generated in the base b) the other transformationally derived by the structure preserving-rule of move-NP. Assuming a Case theory along the lmines of Chomsky (1978), we want to argue a) that some oblique Cases are assigned in the base b) that NP movement can move an oblique Case assigned in the base c) that movement should not be defined in terms of Case but in terms of Government.
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  11. Pierre Pica & José Bonneau (1995). On the Development of the Complementation System in English and its Relation to Switch-Reference. In J. Berman (ed.), Proceedings of the North East Linguistic Society. GLSA.
    In this paper, we show that many of the dramatic changes that took place in the course of the history of the English complementation system are the result of a simple morphological Change in the determiner system. We propose that Old English (OE) evolved from a system in which 'complements' clauses, relative clauses and DP were interpreted as adverbials to a system in which they are interpreted as arguments of the verb. As the determiner acquired certain certain type of morphological (...)
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  12. Pierre Pica & Tibor Papp (eds.) (1988). Transparence Et Opacité. Littérature Et Sciences Cognitives. Cerf.
    Une théorie de la littérature s'appuyant sur les contraintes de langue mises en évidence par la grammaire chomskyenne est-elle envisageable ? Une telle théorie peut-elle reprendre en des termes nouveaux le programme de recherche envisagé - en termes sémiotiques - par Jakobson, qui tentait de constituer une théorie générale du langage, de la poésie et de l'art ? -/- Une théorie linguistique peut-elle participer à la découverte de nouvelles formes littéraires dont elle s'enrichirait en retour ? C'est ce que suggère (...)
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  13. Pierre Pica & Johan Rooryck (1999). Configurational Attitudes. In Esthela Treviño & José Lema (eds.), Semantics Issues in Romance Syntax. John Benjamins.
  14. Pierre Pica & William Snyder (1995). Weak Crossover, Scope, and Agreement in a Minimalist Framework. In Susanne Preuss, Martha Senturia, Raul Aranovich & William Byrne (eds.), Proceedings of the 13th West Coast Conference in Linguistics. Cambridge University Press.
    Our paper presents a novel theory of weak crossover effects, based entirely on quantifier scope preferences and their consequences for variable binding. The structural notion of 'crossover' play no role. We develop a theory of scope preferences which ascribes a central role to the AGR-P System.
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The Minimalist Program
  1. Michael Brody (1998). The Minimalist Program and a Perfect Syntax: A Critical Notice of Noam Chomsky's the Minimalist Program. Mind and Language 13 (2):205–214.
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  2. Noam Chomsky (1995). The Minimalist Program. The Mit Press.
    In these essays the minimalist approach to linguistic theory is formulated and progressively developed.
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  3. Noam Chomsky (1993). A Minimalist Program for Linguistic Theory. In Kenneth Hale & Samuel Jay Keyser (eds.), The View From Building 20: Essays in Linguistics in Honor of Sylvain Bromberger. The Mit Press.
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  4. Noam Chomsky, Marc Hauser, Fitch D. & W. Tecumseh (2005). Appendix. The Minimalist Program. Philosophical Explorations.
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  5. Simon Fitzpatrick (forthcoming). Nativism, Empiricism, and Ockham’s Razor. Erkenntnis:1-28.
    This paper discusses the role that appeals to theoretical simplicity (or parsimony) have played in the debate between nativists and empiricists in cognitive science. Both sides have been keen to make use of such appeals in defence of their respective positions about the structure and ontogeny of the human mind. Focusing on the standard simplicity argument employed by empiricist-minded philosophers and cognitive scientists—what I call “the argument for minimal innateness”—I identify various problems with such arguments—in particular, the apparent arbitrariness of (...)
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  6. James Higginbotham (1998). Visions and Revisions: A Critical Notice of Noam Chomsky's the Minimalist Program. Mind and Language 13 (2):215–224.
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  7. David Johnson & Shalom Lappin (1997). A Critique of the Minimalist Program. Linguistics and Philosophy 20 (3):273-333.
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  8. Anna Szabolcsi, Overt Nominative Subjects in Infinitival Complements Cross-Linguistically: Data, Diagnostics, and Preliminary Analyses. NYU WPL in Syntax, Spring 2009, Ed. By Irwin and Vázquez Rojas. 2009. Http://Linguistics.As.Nyu.Edu/Object/Linguistics.Grad.Nyuwpl#Vol2.
    The typical habitat of overt nominative subjects is in finite clauses. But infinitival complements and infinitival adjuncts are also known to have overt nominative subjects, e.g. in Italian (Rizzi 1982), European Portuguese (Raposo 1987), and Spanish (Torrego 1998, Mensching 2000). The analyses make crucial reference to the movement of Aux or Infl to Comp, and to overt or covert infinitival inflection.
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Transformational Grammar
  1. Hubert G. Alexander (1971). Transformational Grammar and Aristotelian Logic. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 2 (1/2):57-64.
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  2. Emmon Bach, An Extension of Classical Transformational Grammar.
    0. Introductory remarks. I assume that every serious theory of language must give some explicit account of the relationship between expressions in the language described and expressions in some interpreted language which spells out the semantics of the language.1 Let's call this relationship the translation relation. Theories differ as to how this relation is specified. In the Aspects theory of syntax, taken together with a Katz-Postal view of "semantic rules" (Chomsky 1965; Katz and Postal, 1964), it was assumed that (...)
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  3. Malgorzata Haladewicz-Grzelak (2008). An Epistemological Study of Chomsky's Transformational Grammar. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (2):211-246.
    The article traces interpretative mechanisms hidden in Chomsky's Transformational Model. The framework is that of epistemological criticism, investigating the intertwining of interpretation, context and intuition. My hypothesis is that the Transformational Model is an example of a quasi-axiomatic, intuition-based grammar. It is not a scientific model of Competence but a scientistic description of Performance (teleological corpora). The scientistic décor is thus an eristic stratagem to hide arbitrary interpretation. The discussion is empirically substantiated by analyzing the notion of grammaticality, the tectonics (...)
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  4. Paul Kiparsky, Grammaticalization as Optimization.
    According to the neogrammarians and de Saussure, all linguistic change is either sound change, analogy, or borrowing.1 Meillet (1912) identified a class of changes that don’t fit into any of these three categories. Like analogical changes, they are endogenous innovations directly affecting morphology and syntax, but unlike analogical changes, they are not based on any pre-existing patterns in the language. Meillet proposed that they represent a fourth type of change, which he called GRAMMATICALIZATION. Its essential property for him was that (...)
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  5. William G. Lycan (1970). Transformational Grammar and the Russell-Strawson Dispute. Metaphilosophy 1 (4):335–337.
  6. Pierre Pica (1992). Projeter-Alpha Ou la Langue Cachée. In Liliane Tasmowksi & Anne Zribi-Hertz (eds.), De la musique à la linguistique. Hommages à Nicolas Ruwet. Communication & Cognition.
    The article shows that the arugument of a verb can be projected in diffrent ways according to the meaning (agentive or not) of the predicate. An analysis is developed which suggests a modification of the projection principle according to which this principle is in part an interpretative principle, not a principle of the core grammmar.
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  7. Erik Stenius (1973). Syntax of Symbolic Logic and Transformational Grammar. Synthese 26 (1):57 - 80.
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  8. J. W. Swanson (1969). An Unresolved Problem in Transformational Grammar. Journal of Philosophy 66 (5):124-131.
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Universal Grammar
  1. Derek Bickerton (2000). Broca's Demotion Does Not Doom Universal Grammar. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):25-25.
    Despite problems with statistical significance, ancillary hypotheses, and integration into an overall view of cognition, Grodzinsky's demotion of Broca's area to a mechanism for tracking moved constituents is intrinsically plausible and fits a realistic picture of how syntax works.
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  2. Maria Bittner & Ken Hale (2000). Comparative Notes On Ergative Case Systems. In Robert Pensalfini & Norvin Richards (eds.), MITWPEL 2: Papers on Australian Languages. Dep. Linguistics, MIT.
    Ergative languages make up a substantial percentage of the world’s languages. They have a case system which distinguishes the subject of a transitive verb from that of an intransitive, grouping the latter with the object — that is, the object of a transitive verb and the subject of an intransitive verb are in the same case, which we refer to as the nominative. However, ergative languages differ from one another in important ways. In Greenlandic Eskimo the nominative, whether it is (...)
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  3. Maria Bittner & Ken Hale (1996). The Structural Determination of Case and Agreement. Linguistic Inquiry 27 (1):1–68.
    We analyze Case in terms of independent constraints on syntactic structures — namely, the Projection Principle (inherent Case), the ECP (marked structural Case), and the theory of extended projections (the nominative, a Caseless nominal projection). The resulting theory accounts for (1) the government constraint on Case assignment, (2) all major Case systems (accusative, ergative, active, three-way, and split), (3) Case alternations (passive, antipassive, and ECM), and (4) the Case of nominal possessors. Structural Case may correlate with pronominal agreement because the (...)
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  4. James H. Bunn (2000). Universal Grammar or Common Syntax? A Critical Study of Jackendoff's Patterns in the Mind. Minds and Machines 10 (1):119-128.
  5. Stephen Crain & Paul M. Pietroski (2001). Nature, Nurture, and Universal Grammar. Linguistics and Philosophy 24 (2):139-186.
    In just a few years, children achieve a stable state of linguistic competence, making them effectively adults with respect to: understanding novel sentences, discerning relations of paraphrase and entailment, acceptability judgments, etc. One familiar account of the language acquisition process treats it as an induction problem of the sort that arises in any domain where the knowledge achieved is logically underdetermined by experience. This view highlights the cues that are available in the input to children, as well as childrens skills (...)
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  6. David Ellerman, Four Ways From Universal to Particular: How Chomsky's Language-Acquisition Faculty is Not Selectionist.
    Following the development of the selectionist theory of the immune system, there was an attempt to characterize many biological mechanisms as being "selectionist" as juxtaposed to "instructionist." But this broad definition would group Darwinian evolution, the immune system, embryonic development, and Chomsky's language-acquisition mechanism as all being "selectionist." Yet Chomsky's mechanism (and embryonic development) are significantly different from the selectionist mechanisms of biological evolution or the immune system. Surprisingly, there is a very abstract way using two dual mathematical logics to (...)
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  7. Joseph S. Fulda (2008). Pragmatics, Montague, and “Abstracts From Logical Form”. Journal of Pragmatics 40 (6):1146-1147.
    In "Abstracts from Logical Form I/II," it was stated in the abstract that it remained necessary to put the pilot experiments into a "comprehensive theory." It is suggested here that the comprehensive theory is nothing other than classical logic modestly extended to include higher-order predicates, functions, and epistemic predicates, as well as a quantitative quantifier to deal with cases other than "all" (taken literally) or "some" in the sense of at least one. It is further suggested that up to a (...)
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  8. Shane Nicholas Glackin (2011). Universal Grammar and the Baldwin Effect: A Hypothesis and Some Philosophical Consequences. Biology and Philosophy 26 (2):201-222.
    Grammar is now widely regarded as a substantially biological phenomenon, yet the problem of language evolution remains a matter of controversy among Linguists, Cognitive Scientists, and Evolutionary Theorists alike. In this paper, I present a new theoretical argument for one particular hypothesis—that a Language Acquisition Device of the sort first posited by Noam Chomsky might have evolved via the so-called Baldwin Effect . Close attention to the workings of that mechanism, I argue, helps to explain a previously mysterious feature of (...)
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  9. Adele E. Goldberg (2008). Universal Grammar? Or Prerequisites for Natural Language? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):522-523.
    This commentary aims to highlight what exactly is controversial about the traditional Universal Grammar (UG) hypothesis and what is not. There is widespread agreement that we are not born that language universals exist, that grammar exists, and that adults have domain-specific representations of language. The point of contention is whether we should assume that there exist unlearned syntactic universals that are arbitrary and specific to Language.
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  10. John Haiman & Pamela Munro (eds.) (1983). Switch-Reference and Universal Grammar: Proceedings of a Symposium on Switch Reference and Universal Grammar, Winnipeg, May 1981. J. Benjamins Pub. Co..
    The contributions to this volume are concerned with questions of form, function, and genesis of canonical switch-reference systems.
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  11. Per-Kristian Halvorsen & William A. Ladusaw (1979). Montague's 'Universal Grammar': An Introduction for the Linguist. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 3 (2):185 - 223.
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  12. Stevan Harnad (2008). Why and How the Problem of the Evolution of Universal Grammar (UG) is Hard. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):524-525.
    Christiansen & Chater (C&C) suggest that language is an organism, like us, and that our brains were not selected for Universal Grammar (UG) capacity; rather, languages were selected for learnability with minimal trial-and-error experience by our brains. This explanation is circular: Where did our brain's selective capacity to learn all and only UG-compliant languages come from?
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  13. Shriniwas Hemade (2012). Woman : An Etymological Study - Part One. Aajcha Sudharak - Marathi Publication Devoted to Rationalism (12):508-519.
    This article is about an etymological study of the concept "Woman" and leads towards Feminism. Written in Marathi for the first time ever. Published in a Rationalist Journal from Maharashtra. This is first part of the three parts.
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  14. Julia Herschensohn (1998). Universal Grammar and the Critical Age. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):611-612.
    Differences of opinion between Epstein, Flynn & Martohardjono (1996) and some commentators can be traced to different interpretations of Universal Grammar (UG) form or strategy. Potential full access to the form of linguistic universals in second language acquisition may be distinguished from access to UG strategy, but Epstein et al.'s dismissal of the Critical Age Hypothesis clouds their central argument.
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  15. Norbert Hornstein (1995). Putting Truth Into Universal Grammar. Linguistics and Philosophy 18 (4):381 - 400.
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  16. Shalom Lappin, Machine Learning Theory and Practice as a Source of Insight Into Universal Grammar.
    In this paper, we explore the possibility that machine learning approaches to naturallanguage processing being developed in engineering-oriented computational linguistics may be able to provide specific scientific insights into the nature of human language. We argue that, in principle, machine learning results could inform basic debates about language, in one area at least, and that in practice, existing results may offer initial tentative support for this prospect. Further, results from computational learning theory can inform arguments carried on within linguistic theory (...)
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  17. Gita Martohardjono, Samuel David Epstein & Suzanne Flynn (1998). Universal Grammar: Hypothesis Space or Grammar Selection Procedures? Is UG Affected by Critical Periods? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):612-614.
    Universal Grammar (UG) can be interpreted as a constraint on the form of possible grammars (hypothesis space) or as a constraint on acquisition strategies (selection procedures). In this response to Herschensohn we reiterate the position outlined in Epstein et al. (1996a, r), that in the evaluation of L2 acquisition as a UG- constrained process the former (possible grammars/ knowledge states) is critical, not the latter. Selection procedures, on the other hand, are important in that they may have a bearing on (...)
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  18. R. Montague (1970). Universal Grammar. Theoria 36 (3):373--398.
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  19. Kevin Mulligan & Barry Smith (1986). Husserl's Logical Investigations. Grazer Philosophische Studien 27:199-207.
    The magisterial analyses of logic and meaning advanced in Husserl's Logical Investigalions of 1900/01 have for a number of reasons been neglected by analytical philosophers in subsequent decades. This state of affairs has to do, in part, with the history of the editions and translations of Husserl's writings. Findlay's readable but imperfect translation appeared seventy years after the work itself was first published, and the editors and translators and expositors of Husserl's works have reflected the prevailing philosophical atmosphere on the (...)
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  20. Pierre Pica (1988). Sur le Caractère Inaliénable de L'Être. In Pierre Pica & Tibor Papp (eds.), Transparence et opacité. Littérature et sciences cognitives. Cerf. 207--221.
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