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  1. M. Auvray & C. SpenCe (2008). The Multisensory Perception of Flavor. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):1016-1031.
    Following on from ecological theories of perception, such as the one proposed by [Gibson, J. J. . The senses considered as perceptual systems. Boston: Houghton Mifflin] this paper reviews the literature on the multisensory interactions underlying the perception of flavor in order to determine the extent to which it is really appropriate to consider flavor perception as a distinct perceptual system. We propose that the multisensory perception of flavor may be indicative of the fact that the taxonomy currently used to (...)
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  2. David A. Booth (2008). Salty, Bitter, Sweet and Sour Survive Unscathed. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):76-77.
    Types of sensory receptor can only be identified by multidimensional discrimination of a familiar version of a sensed object from variants that disconfound putative types. By that criterion, there is as yet no evidence against just the four classic types of gustatory receptor, for sodium salts, alkaloids, sugars, and proton donors.
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  3. Robert Briscoe (forthcoming). Multisensory Processing and Perceptual Consciousness: Part I. Philosophy Compass.
    Multisensory processing encompasses all of the various ways in which the presence of information in one sensory modality can adaptively influence the processing of information in a different modality. In Part I of this survey article, I begin by presenting a cartography of some of the more extensively investigated forms of multisensory processing, with a special focus on two distinct types of multisensory integration. I briefly discuss the conditions under which these different forms of multisensory processing occur as well as (...)
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  4. Louise Richardson (2013). Flavour, Taste and Smell. Mind and Language 28 (3):322-341.
    I consider the role of psychology and other sciences in telling us about our senses, via the issue of whether empirical findings show us that flavours are perceived partly with the sense of smell. I argue that scientific findings do not establish that we're wrong to think that flavours are just tasted. Non-naturalism, according to which our everyday conception of the senses does not involve empirical commitments of a kind that could be corrected by empirical findings is, I suggest, a (...)
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  5. Louise Richardson, Fiona Macpherson, Mohan Matthen & Matthew Nudds, Symposium on Louise Richardson’s “Flavour, Taste and Smell”. Mind and Language Symposia at the Brains Blog.
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  6. Roger A. Shiner (1979). Sense-Experience, Colours and Tastes. Mind 88 (April):161-178.
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  7. Barry C. Smith (ed.) (2007). Questions of Taste: The Philosophy of Wine. Oxford University Press.
  8. Barry C. Smith (2007). The Objectivity of Tastes and Tasting. In Questions of Taste: the philosophy of wine. Oxford University Press.
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  9. Alessandra Tanesini & Richard Gray (2010). Perception and Action: The Taste Test. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (241):718-734.
    Traditional accounts of perception endorse an input–output model: perception is the input from world to mind and action is the output from mind to world. In contrast, enactive accounts propose action to be constitutive of perception. We focus on Noë's sensorimotor version of enactivism, with the aim of clarifying the proper limits of enactivism more generally. Having explained Noë's particular version of enactivism, which accounts for the contents of perceptual experience in terms of sensorimotor knowledge, we use taste as a (...)
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