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  1. Günter Abel (ed.) (2007). Lebenswelten Und Technologien. Parerga.
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  2. Johann S. Ach, Bettina Schöne-Seifert & Ludwig Siep (2006). Totipotenz und Potentialität: Zum moralischen Status von Embryonen bei unterschiedlichen Varianten der Gewinnung humaner embryonaler Stammzellen. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 11 (1).
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  3. Barbara Advena-Regnery (2005). Klonierung beim Menschen – Biologisches Substrat und Entwicklung. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 10 (1).
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  4. J. Félix Lozano Aguilar (2006). Developing an Ethical Code for Engineers: The Discursive Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):245-256.
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  5. Wael K. Al-Delaimy (2012). Ethical Concepts and Future Challenges of Neuroimaging: An Islamic Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):509-518.
    Neuroscience is advancing at a rapid pace, with new technologies and approaches that are creating ethical challenges not easily addressed by current ethical frameworks and guidelines. One fascinating technology is neuroimaging, especially functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Although still in its infancy, fMRI is breaking new ground in neuroscience, potentially offering increased understanding of brain function. Different populations and faith traditions will likely have different reactions to these new technologies and the ethical challenges they bring with them. Muslims are approximately (...)
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  6. Ramona Albin (2010). Patents, Innovation, and Privatization. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (4):777-781.
    The framers of the U.S. Constitution believed that intellectual property rights were crucial to scientific advancement. Yet, the framers also recognized the need to balance innovation, privatization, and public use. The courts’ expansion of patent protection for biotechnology innovations in the last 30 years raises the question whether the patent system effectively balances these concerns. While the question is not new, only through a thorough and thoughtful examination of these issues can the current system be evaluated. It is then a (...)
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  7. Katherine Alfredo & Hillary Hart (2011). The University and the Responsible Conduct of Research: Who is Responsible for What? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):447-457.
    Research misconduct has been thoroughly discussed in the literature, but mainly in terms of definitions and prescriptions for proper conduct. Even when case studies are cited, they are generally used as a repository of “lessons learned.” What has been lacking from this conversation is how the lessons of responsible conduct of research are imparted in the first place to graduate students, especially those in technical fields such as engineering. Nor has there been much conversation about who is responsible for what (...)
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  8. Joseph S. Alper & Jon Beckwith (2000). On the Philosophical Analysis of Genetic Essentialism. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):311-314.
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  9. Melissa S. Anderson & Joseph B. Shultz (2003). The Role of Scientific Associations in Promoting Research Integrity and Deterring Research Misconduct. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (2):269-272.
    The nature of scientific societies’ relationships with their members limits their ability to promote research integrity. They must therefore leverage their strengths as professional organizations to integrate ethical considerations into their ongoing support of their academic disciplines. This paper suggests five strategies for doing so.
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  10. Liviu Andreescu (2013). Self-Plagiarism in Academic Publishing: The Anatomy of a Misnomer. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):775-797.
    The paper discusses self-plagiarism and associated practices in scholarly publishing. It approaches at some length the conceptual issues raised by the notion of self-plagiarism. It distinguishes among and then examines the main families of arguments against self-plagiarism, as well as the question of possibly legitimate reasons to engage in this practice. It concludes that some of the animus frequently reserved for self-plagiarism may be the result of, among others, poor choice of a label, unwarranted generalizations as to its ill effects (...)
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  11. Lida Anestidou (2004). Commentary on “the Gladiator Sparrow: Ethical Issues in Behavioral Research on Captive Populations of Wild Animals”. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):731-734.
    This case involves invasive research on captive wild populations of birds to study aggressive animal behavior. The case and associated commentaries raise and examine fundamental issues: whether and under what conditions, such research is ethically justified when the research has no expected, direct application to the human species; the moral status of animals and how one balances concern for the animal’s interests against the value of gains in scientific knowledge. They also emphasize the issue of the importance of a thorough (...)
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  12. France Assemblée Nationale (2005). Code de la Santé Publique (Nouvelle Partie Législative). Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 10 (1).
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  13. World Medical Association (2009). Declaration of Helsinki. Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).
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  14. Malcolm Atkinson (2001). 'Peer Review' Culture. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (2):193-204.
    A relatively high incidence of unsatisfactory review decisions is widely recognised and acknowledged as ‘the peer review problem’. Factors contributing to this problem are identified and examined. Specific examples of unreasonable rejection are considered. It is concluded that weaknesses of the ‘peer review’ system are significant and that they are well known or readily recognisable but that necessary counter-measures are not always enforced. Careful management is necessary to discount hollow opinion or error in review comment. Review and referee functions should (...)
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  15. Timothy N. Atkinson & Diane S. Gilleland (2007). Virtue Blindness and Hegemony: Qualitative Evidence of Negotiated Ethical Frameworks in the Social Language of University Research Administration. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):195-220.
    The study used critical discourse analysis (CDA) to elucidate normative structures of ethical behavior in university research administration which may be useful for knowledge transference to future studies of research integrity. Research administration appears to support integrity in the research environment through four very strong normative domains: (1) respect for authority structures; (2) respect for institutional boundaries; (3) professionalism; and (4) a strong sense of virtue. The strong norm structure of research administration, however, appears to be threatened by the fifth (...)
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  16. Andrea J. Baker (2009). Mick or Keith: Blended Identity of Online Rock Fans. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 2 (1):7-21.
    This paper discusses the “blended identity” of online rock fans to show that the standard dichotomy between anonymous and real life personas is an inadequate description of self-presentation in online communities. Using data from an ethnographic, exploratory study of an online community and comparison groups including interviews, an online questionnaire, fan discussion boards, and participant/observation, the research analyzes fan identity online and then offline. Rolling Stones fans often adopt names that illustrate their allegiance to the band, along with avatars. Issues (...)
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  17. Willem Bakker Ii & Michael C. Loui (1997). Can Designing and Selling Low-Quality Products Be Ethical? Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (2):153-170.
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  18. I. I. Bakker & Michael C. Loui (1997). Can Designing and Selling Low-Quality Products Be Ethical? Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (2):153-170.
    Whereas previous studies have criticized low-quality products for inadequate safety, this paper considers only safe products, and it examines the ethics of designing and selling low-quality products. Product quality is defined as suitability to a general purpose. The duty that companies owe to consumers is summarized in the Consumer-Oriented Process principle: “to place an increase in the consumer’s quality of life as the primary goal for producing products.” This principle is applied in analyzing the primary ethical justifications for low-quality products: (...)
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  19. J. I. Bakker (1990). The Gandhian Approach to Swadeshi or Appropriate Technology: A Conceptualization in Terms of Basic Needs and Equity. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 3 (1).
    This is an examination of the significance of Gandhi's social philosophy for development. It is argued that, when seen in light of Gandhi's social philosophy, the concepts of appropriate technology (A.T.) and basic needs take on new meaning. The Gandhian approach can be identified with theoriginal "basic needs" strategy for international development (Emmerij, 1981). Gandhi's approach helps to provide greater equity, or "distributive justice," by promoting technology that is appropriate to "basic needs" (food, clothing, shelter, health and basic education). (...)
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  20. Willem Bakker & Michael C. Loui (1997). Can Designing and Selling Low-Quality Products Be Ethical? Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (2):153-170.
    Whereas previous studies have criticized low-quality products for inadequate safety, this paper considers only safe products, and it examines the ethics of designing and selling low-quality products. Product quality is defined as suitability to a general purpose. The duty that companies owe to consumers is summarized in the Consumer-Oriented Process principle: “to place an increase in the consumer’s quality of life as the primary goal for producing products.” This principle is applied in analyzing the primary ethical justifications for low-quality products: (...)
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  21. Wendy Baldwin (2002). Conflict of Interest and its Significance in Science and Medicine Warsaw, Poland, 5–6 April, 2002. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):469-475.
    This article summarizes the April 5–6, 2002 conference on Conflict of Interest and Its Significance in Science and Medicine. Several themes are identified and addressed, including the globalization of science, the widespread presence of conflicts, the increased interest and involvement in conflict of interest by a number of organizations, the difference between academic research and research conducted by industry, and the tension between science and medicine. At the heart of the matter lies objectivity in research and the need for transparency (...)
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  22. Wendy Baldwin & Belinda Seto (1997). Peer Review: Selecting the Best Science. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (1):11-17.
    The major challenge facing today’s biomedical researchers is the increasing competition for available funds. The competitive review process, through which the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awards grants, is built upon review by a committee of expert scientists. The NIH is firmly committed to ensuring that its peer review system is fair and objective.
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  23. Dr Harvey E. Bale Jr (2005). Industry, Innovation and Social Values. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):31-40.
    Remaining important tasks in finding and developing new drugs and vaccines for HIV/AIDS, malaria, cancer and other diseases require continued industry research and development. Industry’s research and development pipeline has produced drugs that have saved AIDS victims previously facing certain death, but still no cure nor vaccine is yet available. Experience with the process of research and development indicates that it requires more than a decade of development to produce a new drug with costs in the hundreds of millions of (...)
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  24. Harvey E. Bale (2005). Industry, Innovation and Social Values. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):31-40.
    Remaining important tasks in finding and developing new drugs and vaccines for HIV/AIDS, malaria, cancer and other diseases require continued industry research and development. Industry’s research and development pipeline has produced drugs that have saved AIDS victims previously facing certain death, but still no cure nor vaccine is yet available. Experience with the process of research and development indicates that it requires more than a decade of development to produce a new drug with costs in the hundreds of millions of (...)
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  25. Marta Aleksandra Balinska (2002). Ludwik Hirszfeld: Scientist and Humanist. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):269-271.
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  26. Parthasarathi Banerjee (2013). Ethical Issues in Our Times of Technology: Select Exploration. [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (4):383-388.
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  27. Ian G. Barbour (1970). Science & Secularity. New York,Harper & Row.
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  28. D. Barnard-Wills & D. Ashenden (2010). Public Sector Engagement with Online Identity Management. Identity in the Information Society 3 (3):657-674.
    The individual management of online identity, as part of a wider politics of personal information, privacy, and dataveillance, is an area where public policy is developing and where the public sector attempts to intervene. This paper attempts to understand the strategies and methods through which the UK government and public sector is engaging in online identity management. The analysis is framed by the analytics of government (Dean 2010) and governmentality (Miller and Rose 2008). This approach draws attention to the wide (...)
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  29. B. Barry & M. Ohland (2012). ABET Criterion 3.F: How Much Curriculum Content is Enough? Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):369-392.
    Even after multiple cycles of ABET accreditation, many engineering programs are unsure of how much curriculum content is needed to meet the requirements of ABET’s Criterion 3.f (an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility). This study represents the first scholarly attempt to assess the impact of curriculum reform following the introduction of ABET Criterion 3.f. This study sought to determine how much professional and ethical responsibility curriculum content was used between 1995 and 2005, as well as how, when, why, and (...)
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  30. Lauren Bartlett, P. Aarne Vesilind & P. Aarne Vesilind (1998). Expediency and Human Health: The Regulation of Environmental Chromium. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):191-201.
    The complexity of chromium chemistry makes it an ideal example of how the Principle of Expediency, first articulated by sanitary pioneer Earle Phelps, can be used in a standard setting. Expediency, defined by Phelps as “the attempt to reduce the numerical measure of probable harm, or the logical measure of existing hazard, to the lowest level that is practicable and feasible within the limitations of financial resources and engineering skill”, can take on negative connotations unless subject to ethical guidance. In (...)
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  31. Alexander Barzel (1998). The Perplexing Conclusion: The Essential Difference Between Natural and Artificial Intelligence is Human Beings' Ability to Deceive. Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (2):165–178.
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  32. Josep M. Basart & Montse Serra (2013). Engineering Ethics Beyond Engineers' Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):179-187.
    Engineering ethics is usually focused on engineers’ ethics, engineers acting as individuals. Certainly, these professionals play a central role in the matter, but engineers are not a singularity inside engineering; they exist and operate as a part of a complex network of mutual relationships between many other people, organizations and groups. When engineering ethics and engineers’ ethics are taken as one and the same thing the paradigm of the ethical engineer which prevails is that of the heroic engineer, a certain (...)
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  33. Connie R. Bateman, Sean Valentine & Terri Rittenburg (2013). Ethical Decision Making in a Peer-to-Peer File Sharing Situation: The Role of Moral Absolutes and Social Consensus. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):229-240.
    Individuals are downloading copyrighted materials at escalating rates (Hill 2007; Siwek 2007). Since most materials shared within these networks are copyrighted works, providing, exchanging, or downloading files is considered to be piracy and a violation of intellectual property rights (Shang et al. 2008). Previous research indicates that personal moral philosophies rooted in moral absolutism together with social context may impact decision making in ethical dilemmas; however, it is yet unclear which motivations and norms contextually impact moral awareness in a peer-to-peer (...)
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  34. Seth Baum, Jacob Haqq-Misra & Chris Karmosky (2012). Climate Change: Evidence of Human Causes and Arguments for Emissions Reduction. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):393-410.
    In a recent editorial, Raymond Spier expresses skepticism over claims that climate change is driven by human actions and that humanity should act to avoid climate change. This paper responds to this skepticism as part of a broader review of the science and ethics of climate change. While much remains uncertain about the climate, research indicates that observed temperature increases are human-driven. Although opinions vary regarding what should be done, prominent arguments against action are based on dubious factual and ethical (...)
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  35. Christoph Baumgartner (2006). Exclusion by Inclusion? On Difficulties with Regard to an Effective Ethical Assessment of Patenting in the Field of Agricultural Bio-Technology. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (6):521-539.
    In order to take ethical considerations of patenting biological material into account, the so-called “ordre public or morality clause” was implemented as Article 6 in the EC directive on the legal protection of biotechnological inventions, 98/44/EC. At first glance, this seems to provide a significant advantage to the European patent system with respect to ethics. The thesis of this paper argues that the ordre public or morality clause does not provide sufficient protection against ethically problematic uses of the patent system (...)
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  36. Bernard Baumrin (1991). The Conflict Between Science and Ethics. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):31-34.
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  37. Kurt Bayertz (1992). Techno-Thanatology: Moral Consequences of Introducing Brain Criteria for Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (4):407-417.
    This paper is based on the hypothesis that the effort to establish new criteria for diagnosing human death, which has been taking place over the past twenty years or more, can be viewed as a paradigm case for the impact of scientific and technological progress on morality. This impact takes the form of three tendencies within the change in morality, which may be characterized as ‘denaturalization’, ‘functionalization’ and ‘homogenization’. The paper concludes with the view that these tendencies do not indicate (...)
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  38. Ksenija Baždarić, Lidija Bilić-Zulle, Gordana Brumini & Mladen Petrovečki (2012). Prevalence of Plagiarism in Recent Submissions to the Croatian Medical Journal. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):223-239.
    To assess the prevalence of plagiarism in manuscripts submitted for publication in the Croatian Medical Journal (CMJ). All manuscripts submitted in 2009–2010 were analyzed using plagiarism detection software: eTBLAST , CrossCheck, and WCopyfind . Plagiarism was suspected in manuscripts with more than 10% of the text derived from other sources. These manuscripts were checked against the Déjà vu database and manually verified by investigators. Of 754 submitted manuscripts, 105 (14%) were identified by the software as suspicious of plagiarism. Manual verification (...)
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  39. Benita M. Beamon (2005). Environmental and Sustainability Ethics in Supply Chain Management. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (2):221-234.
    Environmentally Conscious Supply Chain Management (ECSCM) refers to the control exerted over all immediate and eventual environmental effects of products and processes associated with converting raw materials into final products. While much work has been done in this area, the focus has traditionally been on either: product recovery (recycling, remanufacturing, or re-use) or the product design function only (e.g., design for environment). Environmental considerations in manufacturing are often viewed as separate from traditional, value-added considerations. However, the case can be made (...)
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  40. Tom L. Beauchamp (2009). The Concept of Paternalism in Biomedical Ethics. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).
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  41. Tom L. Beauchamp (2002). Changes of Climate in the Development of Practical Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (2):131-138.
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  42. Muriel Bebeau & Verna Monson (2011). Authorship and Publication Practices in the Social Sciences: Historical Reflections on Current Practices. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):365-388.
    An historical review of authorship definitions and publication practices that are embedded in directions to authors and in the codes of ethics in the fields of psychology, sociology, and education illuminates reasonable agreement and consistency across the fields with regard to (a) originality of the work submitted, (b) data sharing, (c) human participants’ protection, and (d) conflict of interest disclosure. However, the role of the professional association in addressing violations of research or publication practices varies among these fields. Psychology and (...)
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  43. Hubert F. Beck (1970). The Age of Technology. St. Louis,Concordia Pub. House.
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  44. Ulrich Beck (2012). World Risk Society. In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  45. J. P. Beckmann (2000). Menschliche Identität und die Transplantation von Zellen, Geweben und Organen tierischer Herkunft. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 5:169-182.
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  46. Jan P. Beckmann (2009). Wissen, Rationalität und Orientierungswissen. Zum konsensfähigen Umgang mit aktuellen Debatten. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).
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  47. Jan P. Beckmann (2005). Selbstbestimmung versus Lebensschutz? Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 10 (1).
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  48. Jonathan Beckwith & Lisa N. Geller (1997). Commentary on “the Social Responsibilities of Biological Scientists” (S. J. Reiser and R. E. Bulger). Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (2):145-148.
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  49. Houssem Eddine Bedoui & Walid Mansour (forthcoming). Performance and Maqasid Al-Shari'ah's Pentagon-Shaped Ethical Measurement. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-22.
    Business performance is traditionally viewed from the one-dimensional financial angle. This paper develops a new approach that links performance to the ethical vision of Islam based on maqasid al-shari’ah (i.e., the objectives of Islamic law). The approach involves a Pentagon-shaped performance scheme structure via five pillars, namely wealth, posterity, intellect, faith, and human self. Such a scheme ensures that any firm or organization can ethically contribute to the promotion of human welfare, prevent corruption, and enhance social and economic stability and (...)
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  50. Emily Bell (forthcoming). A Room with a View of Integrity and Professionalism: Personal Reflections on Teaching Responsible Conduct of Research in the Neurosciences. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-9.
    Neuroscientists are increasingly put into situations which demand critical reflection about the ethical and appropriate use of research tools and scientific knowledge. Students or trainees also have to know how to navigate the ethical domains of this context. At a time when neuroscience is expected to advance policy and practice outcomes, in the face of academic pressures and complex environments, the importance of scientific integrity comes into focus and with it the need for training at the graduate level in the (...)
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