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  1. Günter Abel (ed.) (2007). Lebenswelten Und Technologien. Parerga.
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  2. Johann S. Ach, Bettina Schöne-Seifert & Ludwig Siep (2006). Totipotenz und Potentialität: Zum moralischen Status von Embryonen bei unterschiedlichen Varianten der Gewinnung humaner embryonaler Stammzellen. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 11 (1).
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  3. Barbara Advena-Regnery (2005). Klonierung beim Menschen – Biologisches Substrat und Entwicklung. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 10 (1).
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  4. J. Félix Lozano Aguilar (2006). Developing an Ethical Code for Engineers: The Discursive Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):245-256.
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  5. Btihaj Ajana (2010). Reinventing data protection?: Serge Gutwirth et al., Springer 2009 (). Identity in the Information Society 2 (3):355-358.
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  6. Btihaj Ajana (2009). Reinventing Data Protection? Identity in the Information Society 2 (3):355-358.
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  7. Wael K. Al-Delaimy (2012). Ethical Concepts and Future Challenges of Neuroimaging: An Islamic Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):509-518.
    Neuroscience is advancing at a rapid pace, with new technologies and approaches that are creating ethical challenges not easily addressed by current ethical frameworks and guidelines. One fascinating technology is neuroimaging, especially functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Although still in its infancy, fMRI is breaking new ground in neuroscience, potentially offering increased understanding of brain function. Different populations and faith traditions will likely have different reactions to these new technologies and the ethical challenges they bring with them. Muslims are approximately (...)
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  8. Yeslam Al-Saggaf & Md Zahidul Islam (forthcoming). Data Mining and Privacy of Social Network Sites' Users: Implications of the Data Mining Problem. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-26.
    This paper explores the potential of data mining as a technique that could be used by malicious data miners to threaten the privacy of social network sites (SNS) users. It applies a data mining algorithm to a real dataset to provide empirically-based evidence of the ease with which characteristics about the SNS users can be discovered and used in a way that could invade their privacy. One major contribution of this article is the use of the decision forest data mining (...)
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  9. Ramona Albin (2010). Patents, Innovation, and Privatization. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (4):777-781.
    The framers of the U.S. Constitution believed that intellectual property rights were crucial to scientific advancement. Yet, the framers also recognized the need to balance innovation, privatization, and public use. The courts’ expansion of patent protection for biotechnology innovations in the last 30 years raises the question whether the patent system effectively balances these concerns. While the question is not new, only through a thorough and thoughtful examination of these issues can the current system be evaluated. It is then a (...)
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  10. David E. Alexander (2014). Social Media in Disaster Risk Reduction and Crisis Management. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (3):717-733.
    This paper reviews the actual and potential use of social media in emergency, disaster and crisis situations. This is a field that has generated intense interest. It is characterised by a burgeoning but small and very recent literature. In the emergencies field, social media (blogs, messaging, sites such as Facebook, wikis and so on) are used in seven different ways: listening to public debate, monitoring situations, extending emergency response and management, crowd-sourcing and collaborative development, creating social cohesion, furthering causes (including (...)
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  11. Mark Alfino (2012). Twenty Years of Information Ethics and the Journal of Information Ethics. Journal of Information Ethics 21 (2):13-16.
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  12. Katherine Alfredo & Hillary Hart (2011). The University and the Responsible Conduct of Research: Who is Responsible for What? [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):447-457.
    Research misconduct has been thoroughly discussed in the literature, but mainly in terms of definitions and prescriptions for proper conduct. Even when case studies are cited, they are generally used as a repository of “lessons learned.” What has been lacking from this conversation is how the lessons of responsible conduct of research are imparted in the first place to graduate students, especially those in technical fields such as engineering. Nor has there been much conversation about who is responsible for what (...)
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  13. Jonathan S. Allan (1996). Public Health Concerns Take Center Stage in Nuffield Council on Bioethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (4):486-490.
    Nonhuman primates represent an important reservoir for the transmission of new infectious diseases to humans. While several working groups and international agencies have grappled with the ethics of xenotransplantation, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics have recently published a comprehensive and far-reaching series of recommendations that, while not eliminating the infectious disease risks, have nonetheless detailed the major points for concern and have developed a rational approach to minimizing these risks. This report should serve as the blueprint from which to proceed (...)
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  14. Fritz Allhoff (2009). Risk, Precaution, and Emerging Technologies. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 3 (2).
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  15. Fritz Allhoff, Patrick Lin & Jesse Steinberg (2011). Ethics of Human Enhancement: An Executive Summary. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):201-212.
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  16. Joseph S. Alper & Jon Beckwith (2000). On the Philosophical Analysis of Genetic Essentialism. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):311-314.
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  17. Joseph S. Alper & Jon Beckwith (1998). Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination Legislation. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):141-150.
    Genetic discrimination is becoming an increasingly important problem in the United States. Information acquired from genetic tests has been used by insurance companies to reject applications for insurance policies and to refuse payment for the treatment of illnesses. Numerous states and the United States Congress have passed or are considering passage of laws that would forbid such use of genetic information by health insurance companies. Here we argue that much of this legislation is severely flawed because of the difficulty in (...)
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  18. Barbara Alving (2009). Review of Experimenting with the Consumer—The Mass Testing of Risky Products on the American Public. [REVIEW] Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 3 (2).
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  19. Latifah Amin & Hasrizul Hashim (forthcoming). Factors Influencing Stakeholders Attitudes Toward Genetically Modified Aedes Mosquito. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-27.
    Dengue fever is a debilitating and infectious disease that could be life-threatening. It is caused by the dengue virus which affects millions of people in the tropical area. Currently, there is no cure for the disease as there is no vaccine available. Thus, prevention of the vector population using conventional methods is by far the main strategy but has been found ineffective. A genetically modified (GM) mosquito is among the favoured alternatives to curb dengue fever in Malaysia. Past studies have (...)
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  20. Jessica S. Ancker & Annette Flanagin (2007). A Comparison of Conflict of Interest Policies at Peer-Reviewed Journals in Different Scientific Disciplines. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):147-157.
    Scientific journals can promote ethical publication practices through policies on conflicts of interest. However, the prevalence of conflict of interest policies and the definition of conflict of interest appear to vary across scientific disciplines. This survey of high-impact, peer-reviewed journals in 12 different scientific disciplines was conducted to assess these variations. The survey identified published conflict of interest policies in 28 of 84 journals (33%). However, when representatives of 49 of the 84 journals (58%) completed a Web-based survey about journal (...)
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  21. Daniel Andersen (2000). From Case Management to Prevention of Scientific Dishonesty in Denmark. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (1):25-34.
    In 1992, The Danish Medical Research Council established a national committee on scientific dishonesty with the twofold task of handling cases of scientific misconduct and taking preventive initiatives. Scientific dishonesty was proven in only five cases, but in another nine cases lesser degrees of deviations from good scientific practice were found. The experiences from a total of 24 treated cases indicated that three key areas were at the basis of most of the accusations and the deviations from good practice: uncertainty (...)
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  22. Melissa S. Anderson (2007). Collective Openness and Other Recommendations for the Promotion of Research Integrity. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):387-394.
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  23. Melissa S. Anderson (2000). Normative Orientations of University Faculty and Doctoral Students. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):443-461.
    Data from two national surveys of 4,000 faculty and doctoral students in chemistry, civil engineering, microbiology and sociology indicate that both faculty and students subscribe strongly to traditional norms but are more likely to see alternative counternorms enacted in their departments. They also show significant effects of departmental climate on normative orientations and suggest that many researchers express some degree of ambivalence about traditional norms.
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  24. Melissa S. Anderson, Elo Charity Oju & Tina M. R. Falkner (2001). Help From Faculty: Findings From the Acadia Institute Graduate Education Study. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (4):487-503.
    Doctoral students receive many kinds of assistance from faculty members, but much of this support falls short of mentoring. This paper takes the perspective that it is more important to find out what kinds of help students receive from faculty than to assume that students are taken care of by mentors, as distinct from advisors or role models. The findings here are based on both survey and interview data collected through the Acadia Institute’s project on Professional Values and Ethical Issues (...)
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  25. Melissa S. Anderson, Emily A. Ronning, Raymond De Vries & Brian C. Martinson (2007). The Perverse Effects of Competition on Scientists' Work and Relationships. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):437-461.
    Competition among scientists for funding, positions and prestige, among other things, is often seen as a salutary driving force in U.S. science. Its effects on scientists, their work and their relationships are seldom considered. Focus-group discussions with 51 mid- and early-career scientists, on which this study is based, reveal a dark side of competition in science. According to these scientists, competition contributes to strategic game-playing in science, a decline in free and open sharing of information and methods, sabotage of others’ (...)
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  26. Melissa S. Anderson & Joseph B. Shultz (2003). The Role of Scientific Associations in Promoting Research Integrity and Deterring Research Misconduct. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (2):269-272.
    The nature of scientific societies’ relationships with their members limits their ability to promote research integrity. They must therefore leverage their strengths as professional organizations to integrate ethical considerations into their ongoing support of their academic disciplines. This paper suggests five strategies for doing so.
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  27. Liviu Andreescu (2013). Self-Plagiarism in Academic Publishing: The Anatomy of a Misnomer. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):775-797.
    The paper discusses self-plagiarism and associated practices in scholarly publishing. It approaches at some length the conceptual issues raised by the notion of self-plagiarism. It distinguishes among and then examines the main families of arguments against self-plagiarism, as well as the question of possibly legitimate reasons to engage in this practice. It concludes that some of the animus frequently reserved for self-plagiarism may be the result of, among others, poor choice of a label, unwarranted generalizations as to its ill effects (...)
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  28. Lida Anestidou (2004). Commentary on “the Gladiator Sparrow: Ethical Issues in Behavioral Research on Captive Populations of Wild Animals”. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):731-734.
    This case involves invasive research on captive wild populations of birds to study aggressive animal behavior. The case and associated commentaries raise and examine fundamental issues: whether and under what conditions, such research is ethically justified when the research has no expected, direct application to the human species; the moral status of animals and how one balances concern for the animal’s interests against the value of gains in scientific knowledge. They also emphasize the issue of the importance of a thorough (...)
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  29. Ian Angell (2008). As I See It: Enclosing Identity. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 1 (1):23-37.
    This article claims that an ‘enclosure of the commons’ is underway, which reaches far beyond intellectual property, to a point where, through profiling, ‘identity’ has itself become enclosed property that can be owned by another. With a detour through the natures of both money and innovation, this paper looks at the imperative driving ‘intellectual property rights.’ By introducing the notion of biopiracy, it shows how ‘invasion of privacy’ is justified, and ends with “a world of rapacious, state-aided ‘privatization’” of enclosed (...)
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  30. M. Peiffer Ann, E. Hugenschmidt Christina & J. Laurienti Paul (forthcoming). Ethics in 15 Min Per Week. Science and Engineering Ethics.
    The demand for science trainees to have appropriate responsible conduct of research instruction continues to increase the attention shown by federal agencies and graduate school programs to the development of effective ethics curriculums. However, it is important to consider that the main learning environment for science graduate students and post-doctoral research fellows is within a laboratory setting. Here we discuss an internal laboratory program of weekly 15-minute ethics discussions implemented and used over the last 3 years in addition to the (...)
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  31. Carusi Annamaria & De Grandis Giovanni (2012). The Ethical Work That Regulations Will Not Do. Information, Communication and Society 15 (1):124-141.
    Ethical concerns in e-social science are often raised with respect to privacy, confidentiality, anonymity and the ethical and legal requirements that govern research. In this article, the authors focus on ethical aspects of e-research that are not directly related to ethical regulatory framework or requirements. These frameworks are often couched in terms of benefits or harms that can be incurred by participants in the research. The authors shift the focus to the sources of value in terms of which benefits or (...)
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  32. Ali Ansari (2001). The Greening of Engineers: A Cross-Cultural Experience. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):105-115.
    Experience with a group of mechanical engineering seniors at the University of Colorado led to an informal experiment with engineering students in India. An attempt was made to qualitatively gauge the students’ ability to appreciate a worldview different from the standard engineering worldview—that of a mechanical universe. Qualitative differences between organic and mechanical systems were used as a point of discussion. Both groups were found to exhibit distinct thought and behavior patterns which provide important clues for sensitizing engineers to environmental (...)
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  33. Ali Uddin Ansari, Ashfaque Jafari, Ishrat Meera Mirazana, Zulfia Imtiaz & Heather Lukacs (2003). Environmental Education and Socioresponsive Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (3):397-408.
    A recent initiative at Muffakham Jah College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad, India, has resulted in setting up a program called Centre for Environment Studies and Socioresponsive Engineering which seeks to involve undergraduate students in studying and solving environmental problems in and around the city of Hyderabad, India. Two pilot projects have been undertaken — one focusing on design and construction of an eco-friendly house, The Natural House, and another directed at improving environmental and general living conditions in a slum (...)
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  34. Keith Ansell-Pearson (1997). The Transhuman Condition: A Report on Machines, Technics, and Evolution. Routledge.
    Evolution is seen to be entering a bio-technological phase. Nietzsche's affirmation that "man is something that must be overcome" no longer has a rhetorical ring given the means at our disposal at the end of the twentieth century. Viroid Life boldly challenges existing explanations of these changes inherited from modernity, arguing that they have exhausted their usefulness and new models are needed to guide us in mapping through the future. Exploring and critically examining the new realities of artificial life that (...)
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  35. Raymond Anthony (2012). Building a Sustainable Future for Animal Agriculture: An Environmental Virtue Ethic of Care Approach Within the Philosophy of Technology. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (2):123-144.
    Agricultural technologies are non-neutral and ethical challenges are posed by these technologies themselves. The technologies we use or endorse are embedded with values and norms and reflect the shape of our moral character. They can literally make us better or worse consumers and/or people. Looking back, when the world’s developed nations welcomed and steadily embraced industrialization as the dominant paradigm for agriculture a half century or so ago, they inadvertently championed a philosophy of technology that promotes an insular human-centricism, despite (...)
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  36. Florence Appel (2005). Ethics Across the Computer Science Curriculum: Privacy Modules in an Introductory Database Course. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):635-644.
    This paper describes the author’s experience of infusing an introductory database course with privacy content, and the on-going project entitled Integrating Ethics Into the Database Curriculum, that evolved from that experience. The project, which has received funding from the National Science Foundation, involves the creation of a set of privacy modules that can be implemented systematically by database educators throughout the database design thread of an undergraduate course.
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  37. Professor Simon Archer (1996). The Ethics of Creative Accounting. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (1):55-70.
    Creative accounting, which generally involves the preparation of financial statements with the intention of misleading readers of those statements, is prima facie a form oflying, as defined by Bok.1 This paper starts by defining and illustrating creative accounting. It examines and rejects the arguments for considering creative accounting, in spite of its deceptive intent, as not being a form of lying. It then examines the ethical issues raised by creative accounting, in the light of the literature on the ethics of (...)
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  38. Simon Archer (1996). The Ethics of Creative Accounting. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (1):55-70.
    Creative accounting, which generally involves the preparation of financial statements with the intention of misleading readers of those statements, is prima facie a form oflying, as defined by Bok.1 This paper starts by defining and illustrating creative accounting. It examines and rejects the arguments for considering creative accounting, in spite of its deceptive intent, as not being a form of lying. It then examines the ethical issues raised by creative accounting, in the light of the literature on the ethics of (...)
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  39. Berna Arda (2012). Publication Ethics From the Perspective of PhD Students of Health Sciences: A Limited Experience. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):213-222.
    Publication ethics, an important subtopic of science ethics, deals with determination of the misconducts of science in performing research or in the dissemination of ideas, data and products. Science, the main features of which are secure, reliable and ethically obtained data, plays a major role in shaping the society. As long as science maintains its quality by being based on reliable and ethically obtained data, it will be possible to maintain its role in shaping the society. This article is devoted (...)
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  40. J. Scott Armstrong (1997). Peer Review for Journals: Evidence on Quality Control, Fairness, and Innovation. Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (1):63-84.
    This paper reviews the published empirical evidence concerning journal peer review consisting of 68 papers, all but three published since 1975. Peer review improves quality, but its use to screen papers has met with limited success. Current procedures to assure quality and fairness seem to discourage scientific advancement, especially important innovations, because findings that conflict with current beliefs are often judged to have defects. Editors can use procedures to encourage the publication of papers with innovative findings such as invited papers, (...)
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  41. Richard Arneson, Is Moral Theory Perplexed by New Genetic Technology?
    Richard J. Arneson From Choice to Chance: Genes and the Just Society1 intelligently addresses difficult issues at the intersection of medical ethics and the theory of justice. The authors, Dan Brock, Allen Buchanan, Norman Daniels, and Daniel Wikler, repeatedly emphasize their opinion that advances in genetic technology force upon us entirely new ethical questions which previous moral theories lack the resources to resolve.2 The claims that new scientific discoveries render previous moral theories obsolete should be regarded with suspicion. The reader’s (...)
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  42. Jesús Arpal Poblador & Ignacio Mendiola (eds.) (2007). Estudios Sobre Cuerpo, Tecnología y Cultura. Universidad Del País Vasco.
    El cuerpo no designa tanto aquello que el sujeto tiene cuanto el espacio donde la subjetividad se encuentra inmersa. Pensamos y hacemos desde el cuerpo y por ello este trasfondo corporal posee una relevancia que s€lo recientemente ha tenido eco en las ciencias sociales. Sin embargo el cuerpo est_ lejos de constituir una entidad cerrada. El objetivo de este libro, m_s que ser an_lisis exhaustivo de la corporalidad, es proporcionar una muestra heterog»nea de reflexiones, con perspectivas te€ricas y empÃricas donde (...)
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  43. Jean Maria Arrigo (2004). A Utilitarian Argument Against Torture Interrogation of Terrorists. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):543-572.
    Following the September 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, much support for torture interrogation of terrorists has emerged in the public forum, largely based on the “ticking bomb” scenario. Although deontological and virtue ethics provide incisive arguments against torture, they do not speak directly to scientists and government officials responsible for national security in a utilitarian framework. Drawing from criminology, organizational theory, social psychology, the historical record, and my interviews with military professionals, I assess the potential of an official (...)
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  44. W. Brian Arthur (2009). The Nature of Technology: What It is and How It Evolves. Free Press.
    "More than any thing else technology creates our world. It creates our wealth, our economy, our very way of being," says W. Brian Arthur. Yet, until now the major questions of technology have gone unanswered. Where do new technologies come from -- how exactly does invention work? What constitutes innovation, and how is it achieved? Why are certain regions -- Cambridge, England, in the 1920s and Silicon Valley today -- hotbeds of innovation, while others languish? Does technology, like biological life, (...)
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  45. William L. Ascher (2004). Scientific Information and Uncertainty: Challenges for the Use of Science in Policymaking. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):437-455.
    Science can reinforce the healthy aspects of the politics of the policy process, to identify and further the public interest by discrediting policy options serving only special interests and helping to select among “science-confident” and “hedging” options. To do so, scientists must learn how to manage and communicate the degree of uncertainty in scientific understanding and prediction, lest uncertainty be manipulated to discredit science or to justify inaction. For natural resource and environmental policy, the institutional interests of government agencies, as (...)
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  46. Hutan Ashrafian (forthcoming). AIonAI: A Humanitarian Law of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-12.
    The enduring progression of artificial intelligence and cybernetics offers an ever-closer possibility of rational and sentient robots. The ethics and morals deriving from this technological prospect have been considered in the philosophy of artificial intelligence, the design of automatons with roboethics and the contemplation of machine ethics through the concept of artificial moral agents. Across these categories, the robotics laws first proposed by Isaac Asimov in the twentieth century remain well-recognised and esteemed due to their specification of preventing human harm, (...)
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  47. Hutan Ashrafian (forthcoming). Artificial Intelligence and Robot Responsibilities: Innovating Beyond Rights. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-10.
    The enduring innovations in artificial intelligence and robotics offer the promised capacity of computer consciousness, sentience and rationality. The development of these advanced technologies have been considered to merit rights, however these can only be ascribed in the context of commensurate responsibilities and duties. This represents the discernable next-step for evolution in this field. Addressing these needs requires attention to the philosophical perspectives of moral responsibility for artificial intelligence and robotics. A contrast to the moral status of animals may be (...)
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  48. Andrew Askland (2009). Science and Socially Responsible Freedom. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):343-349.
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  49. Andrew Askland (2003). Patenting Genes. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):267-275.
    Patents have been issued in the United States for genes and gene sequences since 1980. Patent protection has provided incentives to aggressively probe the genome of humans and non-humans alike in search of profitable applications. Yet it is not clear that patent protection should have been afforded to genes and gene sequences and it is increasingly clear that patent protection, as currently formulated, is not an appropriate means to realize the full benefits of genetic research. As we stand on the (...)
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  50. Matthias Assel, Stefan Wesner & Alexander Kipp (2009). A Security Framework for Dynamic Collaborative Working Environments. Identity in the Information Society 2 (2):171-187.
    Moving away from simple data sharing within the science community towards cross-organizational collaboration scenarios significantly increased challenges related to security and privacy. They need to be addressed in order to make cross-organizational applications such as collaborative working environments a business proposition within communities such as eHealth, construction or manufacturing. Increasingly distributed scenarios where many different types of services need to be combined in order to implement semantically enriched business processes demand new approaches to security within such dynamic Virtual Organizations. The (...)
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